Oil change how to new and improved with pictures. - Page 3 - 2017+ Chrysler Pacifica Minivan Forums
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post #21 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-08-2018, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by howie12 View Post
indeed they are and I sure wouldn't trust youtube for the facts on everything. If the facts do not make good physical sense they aren't likely to be facts unless the provider comes up with a real description of why this is the case.
????

Marine engines, Benz's, BMW's and others have been proscribing this oil evacuation system for years. Your comment makes no sense. Maybe you could clarify your point.
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post #22 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-08-2018, 07:28 PM
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Howie,
In an earlier post you said "I don't think" and "I don't know".
Yet you post about wanting facts.
When a mechanic pulls a pan from an engine, and there is less oil left with suction vs drain plug, that is a fact.
Pesky things.
They sucked the oil out, then pulled the plug. No oil ran out.
I think BMW and Mercedes engineers are pretty into facts and generally very good engineering practices. Their new engines don't even have drain plugs. I will sleep very well changing oil with my MightyVac.
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post #23 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-08-2018, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by salyers890 View Post
There's quite a few oil filters out there ranging in price and apparent quality. I saw some interesting ones on Amazon. I'm curious if anyone chooses anything over oem and why?
Just bought this K&N filter from Amazon. Reputable brand and very good price.
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post #24 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-09-2018, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Lipster View Post
Howie,
In an earlier post you said "I don't think" and "I don't know".
Yet you post about wanting facts.
When a mechanic pulls a pan from an engine, and there is less oil left with suction vs drain plug, that is a fact.
Pesky things.
Was this done on a Pacifica? That's going to be highly dependent on oil pan design and vehicle angle, as well as dipstick angle. To state that this is a fact for every engine on the road is incorrect, there are just too many variables. It's possible that the angle imparted by driving the car on ramps makes the oil drain plug LESS efficient than overhead extraction when level, but the opposite could also be true.

I don't see why you wouldn't want to do it, though. A small amount of oil is always left in an engine after draining, and the engine isn't likely to care about a couple ounces between methods. If I had the equipment I wouldn't hesitate to use an extractor. Not something else I want to have to store in my garage, though...I've already got a set of ramps and am quite comfortable with the traditional method.
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post #25 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-09-2018, 08:09 AM
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Originally Posted by TomB985 View Post
Was this done on a Pacifica? That's going to be highly dependent on oil pan design and vehicle angle, as well as dipstick angle. To state that this is a fact for every engine on the road is incorrect, there are just too many variables. It's possible that the angle imparted by driving the car on ramps makes the oil drain plug LESS efficient than overhead extraction when level, but the opposite could also be true.

True. Until it has been done on your model car in your environment you don't actually know. I do know that my dipstick reads higher when the front of my Pac is at a lower elevation than the rear (when I am backed in to my driveway, for example) so if I extract from that orientation, I am likely to leave less oil in the pan since the oil will flow toward the dipstick.


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Originally Posted by TomB985 View Post
I don't see why you wouldn't want to do it, though. A small amount of oil is always left in an engine after draining, and the engine isn't likely to care about a couple ounces between methods. If I had the equipment I wouldn't hesitate to use an extractor. Not something else I want to have to store in my garage, though...I've already got a set of ramps and am quite comfortable with the traditional method.

Also true, there is always a trade-off. You would have an extra tool to store (that's one I usually find reasons to justify) . For me I find that it is quicker and easier to use an extractor. I don't have to raise the car. There is no possibility that I will misposition the drain pan or need to adjust its position as the drain progresses to avoid spilling any oil. I don't worry about replacing the crush washer or under or over-torquing the drain plug. I have to be under the hood to change the filter anyway, and I can use the extractor to suck up the little bit of oil in the filter housing. My extractor has a scale such that I can easily tell the amount of oil I have removed. So for me, the benefits far outweigh the disadvantages, but there is no free lunch. EVERYTHING has a cost. We just have to decide for ourselves if the activity we are engaging in is worth whatever that cost is. I can live with storing the extractor - right next to my compressor.

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post #26 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-09-2018, 10:11 AM
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I'd like to move over to an extractor, but I still have 2 other cars that have filters below and will require lifting, messiness, etc. So I am trying to decide whether to buy the extractor. Anyone in the same boat?

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post #27 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-09-2018, 10:23 AM
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Even when I have to lift the front end to get at the filter, I still prefer the extractor. I don't have to have the inevitable hot oil running down my arm, or the splash, or fishing the drain plug out of the oil catch pan when I fumble it cuz it's hot.
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post #28 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-09-2018, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by seo68 View Post
When I first starting using an extractor, I removed the drain plug a couple of times after extracting just to see what else I would get out, and I got either nothing or next to nothing. There is always a little bit of old oil in an engine after an oil change and I assessed that the very small amount that I might add to that by using an extractor was negligible.
There is nothing wrong with either method.

BMW pulls the plug, Mercedes dealers use extractors.

BMW hasnt had dipsticks for 12years, and many Mercedes do not have drain plugs anymore.

If your taking care of your oil and using the correct standards than you will have normal deposits occuring in your engines and whats on the bottom wont be an issue. API standard are an evolving platform - API SL is older tech than SN oil and there have been 13 generations of oil technology.

Oil doesn't sludge like it use to anymore - but can should you "burn" it by running it too hot (oil to low) or fail to change it before the additives that control the oil stability wear out; or reach the limit of its ability to hold the contaminants in suspension ie: gas and carbon from blowby.

Use the right oil from the start, watch the level and color and change it yearly minimum (anti corrosion additives have time limits). And dont let it get too dark - black is WAY too late to keep a healthy engine. Think of it like toast and your engine is the toaster. You put in the pale bread and take it out before its dark brown or black.

I have some tips.

- Pack rags aroung the filter housing for drips and spills.

- Dont reuse the o-ring.

- Add a safe load of oil initially (dont exceed max on the dipstick unless you already know how much it needs - its not always linear above the max marks). Run the engine for 15sec and turn it off to let the oil drain back down. Then clean up, 5w30 can take 20min to settle. 0w20 wont take as long.

- Want to know exactly how long your favorite brand takes to settle? You know that little bit of oil in the bottom of the each bottle? Turn a bottle upside down and start a timer and when the bottle doesnt have a little puddle inside it anymore then thats how long it takes inside your engine to return to the pan (at that temp) and is the time you should wait to check the oil.

- everytime you add oil you should be waiting! So add the right amount once. In case you didnt already know - the difference between minimum and maximum on a dip stick is 1 quart unless marked otherwise. If your readin in the middle, add 0.5qu.

- Do not overfill. If you love your engine, remove the excess. Even a slight amount overfilled causes strain on the crankcase breather system and you'll be creating more pressure inside your engine that can eventually cause leaks. the volume inside the crankcase is engineered for the PCV system ability to vent blow by gases. Reduced volume increases pressure, Positive presure inside a crankcase causes poor oil ring sealing and oil comsumption and stress on your seals/gaskets. Note the opposite is true also - BMW uses vacuum in the crankcase and increases oil control and reduces oil consumption.

- beware additives! Theres a reason No manufacturer recomends additives, its adds an unknown factor. When you add anti-friction additives to anti-friction additves guess what happens? You get an increase in friction! This is a real thing and unless you KNOW your favorite additive is helping, it is safer to avoid using any.

- Porsche has a standard for oil changes. Oil temp above 90c(194f) and drain until there is 1 drip every 10 seconds. This is considered empty.
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Last edited by m0ebius604; 06-09-2018 at 11:46 AM.
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post #29 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-09-2018, 11:58 AM
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Anyone who doesn't have enough room in their garage for an extractor simply needs a larger garage because once you use an extractor for oil you are probably going to quickly realize that you also need a second "clean" extractor for dozens of other liquid sucking chores on your cars and around the house where you cannot use a wet-vac.

I've used my second extractor to pull Rain-X out of my Pacifica washer fluid reservoir, water condensation out of the hard to reach house AC primary drip pan, water from a sink P-Trap. As a non-liquid example I even drilled a hole in a suction cup and fitted it onto the end of the extractor's long flexible straw to retrieve a CD case that went over the edge at the back of my Pacifica's Super Console.

Recently during a fuel pump replacement on my son's car I used one as a spark-free way to extract remaining gas from the tank.

It's the only way I know of to change the oil in my jet skis. Also very handy for lawn mower oil changes.

On the Pacifica since you can change the oil filter while extracting old oil I have done an oil change in under 7 minutes.

Make room for two, haha!!
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post #30 of 73 (permalink) Old 06-09-2018, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by m0ebius604 View Post
And dont let it get too dark - black is WAY too late to keep a healthy engine.
Unless its a diesel.
100 miles after a change it is like ink. Oily ink.
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