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He could with the ClipperCreek dual charging EVSE I linked. :)
No, I was answering the OP that asked using 2 level 1 EVSEs on the same circuit, which is usually only 15 or 20 Amps.

BTW, $1500 is a lot to pay for convenience. I've been using one 30A EVSE for 2 plug ins for over 2 years. I usually charge the PacHy first since it's only 2 hours then unplug it and plug into my Leaf overnight. I've never had a problem with forgetting to charge my Leaf, but YMMV.
 

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It does seem expensive at first, but it makes financial sense if you would otherwise run two circuits, and possibly have to upgrade your sub panel, or if you can't spare four slots in your panel (which would be my case). ClipperCreek has a trade-in program toward the dual chargers. The dual charging EVSE would be a direct fit for my current setup- literally unplug my current EVSE, and plug in the upgraded dual unit. And it would cost about $1250 after trade-in.

Inexpensive? No... but much cheaper than panel upgrades and new circuits done by an electrician (at least in my case). And SUPER convenient. That's the route we plan to go when we have two EVs. ClipperCreek is a bit pricey, but in this case, you get the quality you pay for. Their units are built like tanks. I've had excellent service from mine, and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend their products. The OP might be a candidate for a L2 dual charging EVSE on one circuit.
 

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Only problem is the amperage going to each connected would only be like 16 amp tops . And depending on the length and gauge of wire could be like 12 amps .
 

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The OP might be a candidate for a L2 dual charging EVSE on one circuit.
Probably not since they're planning on 2 PHEVs. If they have one L2 30A EVSE, they would only need 4-5 hours to charge both. Plug one in when they come home from work. Before going to bed, unplug from one and plug into the other. Takes less than a minute and you make sure your garage door is closed and the back door is locked.

I'm wondering why you need dual charging stations? Does each car get driven more than 60 miles (up to 100 if a Model 3) daily? If not, you could charge one in less than 4 hours and the other overnight.
 

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I'm wondering why you need dual charging stations? Does each car get driven more than 60 miles (up to 100 if a Model 3) daily? If not, you could charge one in less than 4 hours and the other overnight.
At the moment, I don't need it. We have just the Pacifica PHEV and another gas vehicle. I'm seriously considering an electric pickup truck when my current vehicle is at end of life. The CC dual charging station would allow for both to be plugged in simultaneously. It's certainly true that I could plug in the PHEV first and then do a swap before bed, but I'd be willing to pay for the convenience of just plugging and not having to think about it.

Either way, EV pickup trucks won't be on the market until late 2022 (or later), so there's still plenty of time to ponder my options. :)
 

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Just picked up a 2020 Pacifica Hybrid and using Level 1/120V charging overnight. Works great for us.

I am considering replacing our 2nd car with another PHEV and also using 120V overnight charging, but reading potential concerns about needing a "dedicated branch circuit" for 120V with charging PHEVs.

Any ideas of charging 2 PHEVs at the same time overnight in the same circuit? Any concerns? Any solutions?
The OEM EVSE will allow the car to pull too much current for two EVSEs on the same 15A circuit. You’ll need a separate circuit for the second EVSE. If you’re going to spend money on an additional circuit you might as well just get a 40A 240V circuit run to the garage with two Level 2 chargers on it. Since it only takes a couple of hours to charge up the van then you can time it so one EVSE charges during one time slot and the other EVSE during a different time slot. I have two Level 2 chargers in my garage wired that way. When I plug the cars in at night I schedule one to start charging at around 12AM and the other charges at around 2AM. This way I can charge them both from 0-100% overnight on a single circuit.
 

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The OEM EVSE will allow the car to pull too much current for two EVSEs on the same 15A circuit. You’ll need a separate circuit for the second EVSE. If you’re going to spend money on an additional circuit you might as well just get a 40A 240V circuit run to the garage with two Level 2 chargers on it. Since it only takes a couple of hours to charge up the van then you can time it so one EVSE charges during one time slot and the other EVSE during a different time slot. I have two Level 2 chargers in my garage wired that way. When I plug the cars in at night I schedule one to start charging at around 12AM and the other charges at around 2AM. This way I can charge them both from 0-100% overnight on a single circuit.
It sounds like you said you have two Level 2 chargers hooked up to one 40A circuit? If so, how?
 

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It sounds like you said you have two Level 2 chargers hooked up to one 40A circuit? If so, how?
You could connect two ‘chargers’ to the same 40A circuit if you wanted to with the restriction that you could only use one at a time. It would be no different than having two outlets in your home on a 15A circuit knowing that you could not run two 1800w hair dryers plugged in to them at the same time. I don’t know for sure if there are any ‘code’ restrictions on doing that but I’d have no problem doing it knowing that the circuit is still protected.
 

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You could connect two ‘chargers’ to the same 40A circuit if you wanted to with the restriction that you could only use one at a time. It would be no different than having two outlets in your home on a 15A circuit knowing that you could not run two 1800w hair dryers plugged in to them at the same time. I don’t know for sure if there are any ‘code’ restrictions on doing that but I’d have no problem doing it knowing that the circuit is still protected.
I don't know if there are any code restrictions either, but if someone would consider doing that, why not just get a dual EVSE like the ClipperCreek unit I linked above? Then you could seamlessly use one circuit to service both EVs, and there is no code violation potential at all (CC units are UL listed).... not to mention the convenience and practicality.
 

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I don't know if there are any code restrictions either, but if someone would consider doing that, why not just get a dual EVSE like the ClipperCreek unit I linked above? Then you could seamlessly use one circuit to service both EVs, and there is no code violation potential at all (CC units are UL listed).... not to mention the convenience and practicality.
I agree. If you have the money to spend on it, go for it. I tend to be a DIYer and I was able to get two Siemens EVSEs on eBay for dirt cheap. One was around $250 and the other was about $60 (not working unit that needed a resistor that cost pennies to fix). I had some wire left over from a cable I used to hook up a whole house generator and there was already a sub panel in the garage so I was able to get two charging stations installed very inexpensively.

By the way, I recently picked up another Siemens Versicharge unit on eBay for under $75 (advertised as untested but working when removed) and it seems the only problem is a little mechanical latch in the J1772 connector that I will repair. There are deals out there if you wait for them and know how to repair.
 

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Just picked up a 2020 Pacifica Hybrid and using Level 1/120V charging overnight. Works great for us.

I am considering replacing our 2nd car with another PHEV and also using 120V overnight charging, but reading potential concerns about needing a "dedicated branch circuit" for 120V with charging PHEVs.

Any ideas of charging 2 PHEVs at the same time overnight in the same circuit? Any concerns? Any solutions?
I realize that this is a relatively old thread, and I’m kinda late to the party but for what it’s worth:

The rather inelegant solution to this problem that I chose when we retired our Grand Caravan and added a Pacifica Hybrid to the household fleet that already included a Ford C-Max energi was to run a 12 ga. extension cord from one of the outdoor outlets to the garage. Those outlets tend to be designed for things like electric bbqs and lawnmowers, so even in older homes, they are likely to be the only outlet on their circuit. 12 ga. extension cords are rated to handle at least 15 amps, and therefore well suited for use with level 1 evse.

If you run 2 extension cords to your garage from two different outlets on two different circuits, you could in theory plug-in the block heaters (block heaters usually draw less than 500 watts) for both of your PHEVs in the garage. This will help you avoid oil maintenance mode (that’s when a PHEV runs its engine to cook off any condensation that may have formed in the engine), and may buy you a few extra miles of all-electric range on cold days, because your oil and coolant will be about 50 degrees centigrade above ambient temperature. This means that the vehicle’s HVAC system will draw less energy from the battery to warm up the cabin and clear the windshield.

Good luck.
 

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This is a very interesting topic. As we move, my choice or by force, to vehicles that need charged, our homes will need to be reconfigured to meet this new reality.
 

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Check out the Grizzl-e Duo. 2 charging cables, 1 circuit, automatic sharing, selectable circuit amp limit.

Grizzl-e Duo

I have a Grizzl-e and it works great. Made in Canada.
 
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