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Discussion Starter #21
I swear I tried that on my Wrangler and it didn't do anything. If you do it, let us know :)
I'm going back and forth with the idea of springing for the electronic module and installing it as a gift for my daughter.
Still the wire is so easy, I may try it just to prove if it will work or not.
Are you sure you disconnected the correct connector? I've seen several tutorials for Jeeps and Pacifica's they all show a little black module connected as part of the ground terminal to the battery. Connected to it is a several wire connector. I've seen it described as a current sensor for the battery, I'm guess being used with other things to determine if there is enough battery power to use the ECC. The old message ECC unavailable the battery is charging.
 

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I'm going back and forth with the idea of springing for the electronic module and installing it as a gift for my daughter.
Still the wire is so easy, I may try it just to prove if it will work or not.
Are you sure you disconnected the correct connector? I've seen several tutorials for Jeeps and Pacifica's they all show a little black module connected as part of the ground terminal to the battery. Connected to it is a several wire connector. I've seen it described as a current sensor for the battery, I'm guess being used with other things to determine if there is enough battery power to use the ECC. The old message ECC unavailable the battery is charging.
That part is the intelligent battery sensor. It measures battery voltage, state of charge, temperature, and current draw. The ESS needs to know state of charge in order to function which is why this disables it. But you’d also be disabling some other useful features, most notably, smart charge. Smart charge varies alternator output based on battery state of charge and battery temperature, to avoid overcharging the batteries.
I’d recommend getting the plug in module. It will not disable those features I mentioned above and it will eliminate the amber @ light on in the cluster. Plus it will be much easier to remove if a trip to the dealer is needed for service.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
That part is the intelligent battery sensor. It measures battery voltage, state of charge, temperature, and current draw. The ESS needs to know state of charge in order to function which is why this disables it. But you’d also be disabling some other useful features, most notably, smart charge. Smart charge varies alternator output based on battery state of charge and battery temperature, to avoid overcharging the batteries.
I’d recommend getting the plug in module. It will not disable those features I mentioned above and it will eliminate the amber @ light on in the cluster. Plus it will be much easier to remove if a trip to the dealer is needed for service.
I ordered the module, and plan on installing it for my daughter.

My 2011 Jeep has Smart Charge, the FSM describes it exactly as you do the Smart Charge for the Pacifica. But there is no sensor on the battery cables. Doesn't mean they didn't change it to use the sensor that was needed for the ECC to also measure current flow. The smart charge creates some confusion on the Jeep Forums for later Jeeps, those that pull up the voltmeter (on later models) complain the system voltage seems to go up or down for no reason, thus concluding something is wrong. You have to explain to them the smart charging and its changing system voltage according to the battery state and not to overcharge the AGM battery.

For the defeat module, while installation does not look difficult at all, it is still more time consuming than disconnecting a single connector. I'm going to hope if my daughter takes it to a dealership, they simply are not going to notice that the ESS button returns to the last position it was set after restart.

Can you pull up the electric system voltage on the EVIC/Instrument Panel on the Pacifica? I can't do it on my 2011 Jeep, I can pull up a lot of digital monitoring for other things, but not a voltmeter. Later Jeep owners have reported they added a voltmeter to the vehicle info screen and got rid of the engine water temp (because of nuisance complaints to the Dealers).

Out of curiosity, I may disconnect the single connector to see if it works, also monitor the voltmeter, if I can, to see if the smart charge is working the same.
 

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I ordered the module, and plan on installing it for my daughter.

My 2011 Jeep has Smart Charge, the FSM describes it exactly as you do the Smart Charge for the Pacifica. But there is no sensor on the battery cables. Doesn't mean they didn't change it to use the sensor that was needed for the ECC to also measure current flow. The smart charge creates some confusion on the Jeep Forums for later Jeeps, those that pull up the voltmeter (on later models) complain the system voltage seems to go up or down for no reason, thus concluding something is wrong. You have to explain to them the smart charging and its changing system voltage according to the battery state and not to overcharge the AGM battery.

For the defeat module, while installation does not look difficult at all, it is still more time consuming than disconnecting a single connector. I'm going to hope if my daughter takes it to a dealership, they simply are not going to notice that the ESS button returns to the last position it was set after restart.

Can you pull up the electric system voltage on the EVIC/Instrument Panel on the Pacifica? I can't do it on my 2011 Jeep, I can pull up a lot of digital monitoring for other things, but not a voltmeter. Later Jeep owners have reported they added a voltmeter to the vehicle info screen and got rid of the engine water temp (because of nuisance complaints to the Dealers).

Out of curiosity, I may disconnect the single connector to see if it works, also monitor the voltmeter, if I can, to see if the smart charge is working the same.
Yes the EVIC had the system voltage if you scroll to it.
Depending on where she lives, the voltage may not be noticeably lower as I’ve only seen it go to a lower charging voltage during the warmer summer months. It seems, once it gets colder out, it’s goes to 14.5 volts.
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
Yes the EVIC had the system voltage if you scroll to it.
Depending on where she lives, the voltage may not be noticeably lower as I’ve only seen it go to a lower charging voltage during the warmer summer months. It seems, once it gets colder out, it’s goes to 14.5 volts.
Yea, adding the battery temp sensor is something they did since the 90's to more smartly charge the battery's and prevent overcharging. You would notice voltage varied strictly according to ambient air temp, only on long trips in the cold, where the battery may have warmed up from heat under the hood, might you see the volts come down a tiny bit from the higher voltage it was making from the cold.

In my 2011, with even more smart microprocessor and sensors charging, I notice the volts change with temperature, but also change independent of the temperature also. On long trips, I've seen 13 Volts for a while, just to jump back up to 14.5 Volts for a while. (I have an aftermarket stereo head unit, that lets me pull up system voltage).

The FSM talks about how the charges the battery using PWM, and how it accesses the battery's state of charge, I doesn't say how it measures the battery while also charging it. But I suspect that in null moments of the square wave for PWM, they measure the battery and adjust from there.

So, I'm thinking taking the vehicle for a test drive, monitoring voltage, look for the drops and increases in voltage I see with the smart charging, which may not be easy, it might take longer than I'm willing to do a test drive. Disconnect the cable to the battery sensor and take another test drive, confirm it actually turns off the ESS, and look to see if I can see the voltage indications of smart charging, or if the system just holds a single charging voltage. If I do it, I'll post back with results. Those results might just be, I just couldn't tell monitoring the voltmeter, it was taking more time than I was willing to give.
 
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