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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just thought that I would let everyone know of an issue that my PacHy experienced last week. At about 7,800k miles, the check engine light came on. I called the dealership and they said that it was probably the result of getting gas recently and to see if the light went out the next day. The light did go out the next morning, only to return later that day. While waiting to get service, it would reset in the morning, only to return later in the day. It did this for 3 days until my appointment.



My PacHy has been at the dealer for almost a week now and they have determined that the battery heater needs to be replaced. Currently, it's on backorder and they hope they can get the part by the end of the week. Based on the amount of time it took to get my car in the first place, I'm not holding my breath that it'll be that quick!



Not sure if this info is useful to anyone, but I thought I'd share. It's a 2017 PacHy that was built in August and delivered in September. It's been cold for the past couple of weeks. I live in South Jersey. The van stays plugged in to a level II charger overnight and I have not had any issues up until this point. I love this car and I appreciate it even more after driving around a Grand Caravan for the past week.



I'll keep you updated on what happens.
 

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Just thought that I would let everyone know of an issue that my PacHy experienced last week. At about 7,800k miles, the check engine light came on. I called the dealership and they said that it was probably the result of getting gas recently and to see if the light went out the next day. The light did go out the next morning, only to return later that day. While waiting to get service, it would reset in the morning, only to return later in the day. It did this for 3 days until my appointment.

My PacHy has been at the dealer for almost a week now and they have determined that the battery heater needs to be replaced. Currently, it's on backorder and they hope they can get the part by the end of the week. Based on the amount of time it took to get my car in the first place, I'm not holding my breath that it'll be that quick!

Not sure if this info is useful to anyone, but I thought I'd share. It's a 2017 PacHy that was built in October and delivered in September. It's been cold for the past couple of weeks. I live in South Jersey. The van stays plugged in to a level II charger overnight and I have not had any issues up until this point. I love this car and I appreciate it even more after driving around a Grand Caravan for the past week.

I'll keep you updated on what happens.
Hi smity84,

Sorry to hear about this! Please send us a PM with your VIN if you would like further assistance during your appointment, we're happy to help if needed.

Andrea
Chrysler Social Care Specialist
 

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I live in Ohio and had the same experience and had my battery heater replaced about a week ago. Mine was built in the the spring and have 12K miles on it.

I have had no issues since it was replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I live in Ohio and had the same experience and had my battery heater replaced about a week ago. Mine was built in the the spring and have 12K miles on it.

I have had no issues since it was replaced.
Very interesting...how long did it take you to get the part and for them to replace it? Good to hear that all has been good since!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi smity84,

Sorry to hear about this! Please send us a PM with your VIN if you would like further assistance during your appointment, we're happy to help if needed.

Andrea
Chrysler Social Care Specialist
Thank you, Andrea. Message sent!
 

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What is the "battery heater?" The Pacifica Hybrid only has one Electric Coolant Heater (ECH), which heats both the cabin and the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What is the "battery heater?" The Pacifica Hybrid only has one Electric Coolant Heater (ECH), which heats both the cabin and the battery.
I have no idea. In talking to my service rep at the dealer, he has just said it needs a new battery heater. Perhaps it is what you are describing? I'll know more when I get the invoice.
 

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iirc battery heater was one of the notorious failure types around, one forum member IIRC has had 2 incidents in a row (replacement + replacement after replacement).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just wanted to provide an update...

Finally got the car back after 17 days at the dealership. I felt like I had to jump through hoops at the dealer. At first they said the part they needed was on back order and had an estimated date of February! Luckily they were able to make some calls and get that resolved. They also didn't seem to thrilled to be working on the hybrid. It sounds like it's a pain to do anything related to the battery. They had to rope off a portion of their shop and the tech had to wear a full protective suit, all while being attached to a rope so that someone could pull him away if something went wrong. It really doesn't leave me with a good feeling of getting this thing serviced in the future. In their defense, it was their first hybrid that they've worked on, so hopefully it'll get better.

I have attached their notes from my work order for anyone looking for specifics.
 

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Thanks for the update. Glad it got sorted out for you.

I see that it is called the battery heater. Heating the battery is one of its jobs, as is heating the cabin.

The dealership had better get used to working on Hybrids/EVs. They’re only going to be more common.
 

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They had to rope off a portion of their shop and the tech had to wear a full protective suit, all while being attached to a rope so that someone could pull him away if something went wrong.
I saw the instructions to rope off the working area in Chrysler videos, everything else is a crazy overkill. The battery has an external disconnect plug, once it is removed, the battery is safe to handle. Disassembling the battery and working on the individual cells may be a different story, but they didn't do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I saw the instructions to rope off the working area in Chrysler videos, everything else is a crazy overkill. The battery has an external disconnect plug, once it is removed, the battery is safe to handle. Disassembling the battery and working on the individual cells may be a different story, but they didn't do it.


Yeah. It felt like they were gloating about all they had to do to fix my car. They actually had me feeling uncomfortable...like I was a burden on them. It’s definitely got me considering another dealer.

I wish I could see what they did. I have a dash cam, but it shut off when they disconnected the 12volt battery, so I didn’t see much.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I saw the instructions to rope off the working area in Chrysler videos, everything else is a crazy overkill. The battery has an external disconnect plug, once it is removed, the battery is safe to handle. Disassembling the battery and working on the individual cells may be a different story, but they didn't do it.


Yeah. It felt like they were gloating about all they had to do to fix my car. They actually had me feeling uncomfortable...like I was a burden on them. It’s definitely got me considering another dealer.

I wish I could see what they did. I have a dash cam, but it shut off when they disconnected the 12volt battery, so I didn’t see much.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes its a bit of an adjustment getting used to working on HV systems. They introduce 10 new possible ways to die on the job without the hazard pay.. but like you mention are actually safe once the contactors are disengaged inside the hv battery - the question is did they!?

The overkill is a trained fear and taken quite seriously by workers compensation and unions and honestly in the begining is over used which actually useful as an orientation process for all the dealerships staff.

The ropes are counter intuitive in the begining - they're supposed to keep unqualified workers out of a POTENTIALLY dangerous workspace but they actually attract everyone like moths to a flame!

Everyone comes to see and the technicians tend to feel the ropes don't apply to them so they come right on in to see whats up.. its hard to work with all the interest. But after a while everyone gets used to the sight and goes about their business.

But the ropes are important for several reasons. They prevent the uninitiated and curious from fiddling with the parts because they break stuff and there is a chance a helpful tech might place the high voltage back on without telling anyone.

Sometimes the systems are actually not safe and this is what all this process is about - that 1 or 2%! Because employees dying is bad PR


Chrysler has a process of opening the PIM and measuring the HV Voltage to confirm that the system is off and safe when the contactors are supposed to be open. This is why they put on the Intel suits and prius gloves. There is a chance the contactors arch and fuse in the ON position. I have seen this on only 1 car in 5years myself - lucky BMW has a built in system to detect unsafe shutdown so no suits.

Some manufacturers allow hybrid techs to open the HV battery for cell repairs and the insides are always live and ropes and safety gear are critical. Theres enough power in the that HV battery to shock you dead and light your body hair on fire 30s later from the smoulder.

I dont think its cool to rip on them for using the saftey protocol they've been taught.
 

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Yeah but this kind of leaves me with the feeling I would be driving around
with a nuclear reactor in the car if I bought one of these.
 

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Yeah but this kind of leaves me with the feeling I would be driving around
with a nuclear reactor in the car if I bought one of these.
More ICE cars catch fire every year than EV's. This tech is 5 star crash test certified and that fear is not really substantiated since gasoline is also explosive
 

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People dressing in Bunny suits has to add to the cost of maintenance when its out of warranty. It will probably become routine at some point but it gives me and uh oh feeling right now.
 

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I probably have a somewhat cavalier approach to electricity. In the beginning of my career I worked with high voltage electronics and survived by not touching the naked wires. Not that I advocate it, and the battery has a lot more stored energy and potential for devastation.
Still, a fully assembled battery shouldn't be handled like a nuclear reactor. I checked the FCA's procedure for powering down the high voltage circuitry, and it doesn't call for any extreme measures.
Being curious, I watched the WeberAuto videos on the Hybrid technology. This video is 2 hours long, and it tells you everything about the design and operation of the battery.
It also illustrates the proper safety procedures. Note that there are no full body suits or ropes involved.
The Volt battery in the video has a mechanical safety disconnect, which separates the battery in the middle, making it safe even if the contactors are fused. I don't think that PacHy has a similar disconnect, so it has to rely on the interlock and residual voltage measurements.
 

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Cool video..

Yeah at BMW we break down the i3 battery voltage to a safe level once we have the battery box opened by splitting in half then quarters down to below 60v segments. We dont need any special suits, gloves or the need for a hook for normal repairs.. but we padlock the interlock mechanism and rope off the site where the battery is stored. It is considered to be an intrinsically safe design. We can replace any defective part inside the HV battery.

If the contactors are fused then we need to be a specially trained certification level for handling live systems and the ropes and gloves are used.

We have really cool testing tools for re-certifying the battery before install and tests the battery to factory standards and issues a release code on pass thats required for the battery to be put back into service once the car is back together so the brand can ensure the customer is safe also once the cars are repaired.

This isnt really new tech. With Soo many EV's and PHEVS and many more to come its going to be a standard service.

I have to pump gas outa fuel tanks and wear gloves to change sending units and pump too and i feel worse off every time i do one of these jobs than anything else i have to do.
 

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A tank of gas is more dangerous than a battery. While there is nothing particularly revolutional about a battery, a motor and a power inverter, the auto application is relatively new, and the territory is unfamiliar for the majority of the mechanics. They would eventually learn, however the problem lies in a different plane. Servicing the Hybrid system required those "really cool testing tools", and only the dealerships will have them. Even a routine service like changing coolant has to be done with the scan tool.
 
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