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Thanks for giving me an idea of a battery that might work. I'm expecting that mine will need replaced sometime. Date of van manufacture? (on driver's door edge) ESS?
No ESS. Date of manufacture was September 2016. New battery is working great BTW. No more door unavailable messages.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
In step 5 (has the #2 in the diagram), it says to remove the cables from the prefuse assembly. How do you do that? In the photo with the green arrow, something needs to be pressed to release the cables?
 

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In step 5 (has the #2 in the diagram), it says to remove the cables from the prefuse assembly. How do you do that? In the photo with the green arrow, something needs to be pressed to release the cables?
I didn't do that step and was able to do the change no problem. I assume you would want to do that to make it easier to get the old battery out since the prefuse assembly is cumbersome with not much slack.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
If you are in the no start situation and unable to get a jump start, a good piece of equipment to have on hand is something like this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077HY7SFJ/?coliid=I1RLTRLXRSQAVV&colid=319025MVD9EZD&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it
A portable jump start.
I believe @m0ebius604 recommended it in the hybrid section.
Another reason to have this immediately available is, if your battery is dead and the emergency brake is on (it is electric) you won't even be able to push the van without supplying power to turn off the emergency brake.

This thread is supposed to provide information. If the information is incorrect or needs additional input, please add to it to help others out. :smile2:
 

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If you are in the no start situation and unable to get a jump start, a good piece of equipment to have on hand is something like this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077HY7SFJ/?coliid=I1RLTRLXRSQAVV&colid=319025MVD9EZD&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it
A portable jump start.
I believe @m0ebius604 recommended it in the hybrid section.
Another reason to have this immediately available is, if your battery is dead and the emergency brake is on (it is electric) you won't even be able to push the van without supplying power to turn off the emergency brake.

This thread is supposed to provide information. If the information is incorrect or needs additional input, please add to it to help others out. :smile2:
I saw a caution (not sure if in this forum) about storing these jumpers in hot cars. I don't remember if it is a hazard or it just drains the battery quickly.

This thread from a few years ago has some interesting comments, but they seem to be mostly for small (flashlight) batteries, but one post where someone tested temperatures on a car in the sun for 3 hours was very interesting -- cloth seats - 138 degrees! Anybody leave li ions in car during summer?

This is a chatty article about leaving items in hot cars -- https://www.businessinsider.com/never-keep-these-your-car-on-a-hot-day-2018-8 --- they note that Apple says after 95 degrees, their batteries can permanently degrade. (those of you who keep water bottles in the car, see #3.......)

Anyone have more specific information about safely storing these chargers? I would guess under floor if the Stow & Go seat is up is the best.
 

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I'd like to share my 2 cents here, of which I hope has some common sense.

Lithium Batteries are a key component of Hybrid and Electric cars - They are always exposed to "parking in heat". If you live in Phoenix, your vehicles Lithium batteries are going to get just as hot as one stored inside the cabin. The minimum warranty on the hybrids Lithium battery is 8years, regardless if you are living in Phoenix or the Arctic.

Lets look at a lead acid battery:

it needs to be stored plugged in 24/7 on a float charger or it will degrade and need replacement within 6 months. If you have it properly pluged in (in a cool dry place on 120v), it will not be with you when you need it. if you fail to maintain a lead acid battery and it becomes damaged, it will not charge and will not help you in a jam if abused.

Lead acid batterys can short and cause fire too.

If you keep lead acid in the vehicle you'll find that lead acid boosters are bulky, heavy, and needs to be stored on the floor in the trunk in almost all cases where it will be subjected to heat and vibration/floping/banging around - this knocks the lead dioxide off the plates, when this happens it destroys that part of the battery instantly. According to Jump-n-Carry's documents the lead acid jump pack, temperatures above 70f (21c) "decrease amperage output". You will need to make a mounting fixture and connect the "in vehicle" DC 12v outlet adapter to ensure any life span.

Lead acid boosters rarely last 4years anyway with the best treatment and are usually >$100

So how does this compare? Lets look at Lithium Ion batteries:

Lithium does not like to be stored on a constant charge, but it is recommended to be recharged every 6months. Fits in the glovebox or console and so is always with you. Can last 2-4 years shelf life with the slowest rate of decay among battery types - but will degrade the overall maximum power available as time passes. BUT it will charge, and will get you out if a jam when you need it if its abused. Even if its one use per charge instead of 20.

Lithium-Ion can short and cause fire too.

Fits in the glove box or console. Can be recharged with the "in vehicle" DC 12v outlet adaptor from the glovebox or console. Very vibration/flop/banging around proof in its case. A randomly polled Lithium Ion Jumper packs instructions say to avoid 149f (65c) and above temps or reduced battery life may result - these temperatures will cause physical harm and scalding to bare human flesh.

Can last 4-10years with proper use. And a good one can be had for <$100

Honestly, for around $60 its not an issue for me to let it to suffer.. they are way more life proof than the old lead acid models.

But to each there own.

With a gas Pacifica battery failure, a replacement battery (or with ESS possibly an additional battery) may get someone back on the road and can be a relatively easy and quick fix if the standard type of battery is available somewhere. If I were told that a battery under warranty was on back order and another battery was available, I would probably buy an available battery that would work and not worry about the prorated part of the battery warranty. It wouldn't take long to spend more than that amount on a rental if a loaner wasn't provided through the dealer or the extended warranty.

Thanks @Longtimemopar for trying to find out the information to replace a battery yourself.
@II Kings 9:20 used a Mopar replacement 730 CCA battery for the main battery in a 2017 gas Pacifica under warranty.

A hybrid Pacifica battery is a different story and there are many other threads for hybrid battery issues.
Thanks for reminding owners to check their manuals.
I saw a caution (not sure if in this forum) about storing these jumpers in hot cars. I don't remember if it is a hazard or it just drains the battery quickly.

This thread from a few years ago has some interesting comments, but they seem to be mostly for small (flashlight) batteries, but one post where someone tested temperatures on a car in the sun for 3 hours was very interesting -- cloth seats - 138 degrees! Anybody leave li ions in car during summer?

This is a chatty article about leaving items in hot cars -- https://www.businessinsider.com/never-keep-these-your-car-on-a-hot-day-2018-8 --- they note that Apple says after 95 degrees, their batteries can permanently degrade. (those of you who keep water bottles in the car, see #3.......)

Anyone have more specific information about safely storing these chargers? I would guess under floor if the Stow & Go seat is up is the best.
 

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Thanks @m0ebius604 -- very interesting.

There was a discussion on 12V (lead) batteries a while ago and someone brought up a study, but the results were not documented clearly and could be interpreted to mean you could never start your car on hot day, so I know "studies" don't always present a realistic path forward.

But with all the sensational publicity when someone's laptop battery or e-cigarette goes up in flames, I was wondering if someone did have some definitive answers about safe storage. I was more concerned about hazard than failure. There are untold millions, if not billions of the things around, so to expect zero failures is unrealistic, but we don't want to deliberately go into a danger zone.
 

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Thanks @m0ebius604 I was wondering if someone did have some definitive answers about safe storage.
Thats something I cant offer.

I was more concerned about hazard than failure. There are untold millions, if not billions of the things around, so to expect zero failures is unrealistic, but we don't want to deliberately go into a danger zone.
You said it. There are untold millions or even billions of lithium based devices in the world.

The reality is that driving may be the most dangerous activity most people are exposed to on a daily basis.. We hurdle ourselves through space and time in confidence (or ignorance) of our safety. Driving down a road at 80mph, when you pass a car doing the same speed the closing speed is 160mph. We trust other drivers competency with our lives and the lives of our loved ones. So choosing to ride in a 16kW lithium powered vehicle and being worried about a lithium booster pack seems a little counter intuitive IMO.

I have 2 Apple iPhone 3GS's (from 2009) that sat for 3years, charged up and worked for 4years and one had to be recycled because the battery started swelling. Nothing as dramatic as a thermal event or anything, just over a month noticed the case crack and then spread a bit. The other is still working fine.

I believe lithium is solid. They had a production issue with the Samsung packs. Stuff happens. Planes crash with the highest of standards.

Ultimately, if you own a Hybrid - I would think you have already accepted that Lithium has little to worry about in the big picture.
 

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[EDITED]
.....So choosing to ride in a 16kW lithium powered vehicle and being worried about a lithium booster pack seems a little counter intuitive IMO....
Agreed that driving is one of the most risky routine things we do. But the fact that we are engaging in one risky behavior from whatever motivation does not imply that we should gratuitously add another risk on top of it --- I was thinking more along the lines of added hazards that we do have some more control over than other drivers.

I have a healthy respect for battery power. Early in my career, I worked with locomotives (up to 3600 HP V16's) and the batteries that could cold crank those diesel power plants. And in engineering school, in a new lab with DC circuits powered by a battery bank, a mislabeled receptacle led us to create a dead short -- the wires melted before the circuit breaker could react. I know how fast and powerfully batteries can discharge in a dangerous manner.

So, despite the decades that elapsed since those experiences, I remain respectful of the high energy content of these portable power packs. RT[F]M is a constant refrain, and overlooking storage cautions is an easy mistake.* But I am somewhat reassured that the lack of headlines and consumer alerts are an empirical marker that these booster units are relatively safe in a normal consumer environment.

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* What is the most frequent lie in real life? "I have read and agree to the terms / conditions / license" Sidebar: An old but still relevant primer in what you may have agreed to is at
https://www.newstatesman.com/science-tech/internet/2016/12/what-are-scariest-terms-and-conditions-youve-agreed
 

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Agreed that driving is one of the most risky routine things we do. But the fact that we are engaging in one risky behavior from whatever motivation does not imply that we should gratuitously add another risk on top of it --- I was thinking more along the lines of added hazards that we do have some more control over than other drivers.

I have a healthy respect for battery power. Early in my career, I worked with locomotives (up to 3600 HP V16's) and the batteries that could cold crank those diesel power plants. And in engineering school, in a new lab with DC circuits powered by a battery bank, a mislabeled receptacle led us to create a dead short -- the wires melted before the circuit breaker could react. I know how fast and powerfully batteries can discharge in a dangerous manner.

So, despite the decades that elapsed since those experiences, I remain respectful of the high energy content of these portable power packs. RT[F]M is a constant refrain, and overlooking storage cautions is an easy mistake.* But I am somewhat reassured that the lack of headlines and consumer alerts are an empirical marker that these booster units are relatively safe in a normal consumer environment.

---------------------------------------
* What is the most frequent lie in real life? "I have read and agree to the terms / conditions / license" Sidebar: An old but still relevant primer in what you may have agreed to is at
https://www.newstatesman.com/science-tech/internet/2016/12/what-are-scariest-terms-and-conditions-youve-agreed
Everyone has to decide for themselves the risk.

The materials are manufactured with North American safety standards and comply to our laws requirements.. and as you point out "the lack of headlines" should have a some merrit considering the rampant abuse of the millions of lithium devices out there.

Agreed about the terms and conditions. If you want to participate, you must accept. Although I am skeptical how some of the most unreasonable terms and conditions would hold up in court - I am no lawyer. :|
 

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Everyone has to decide for themselves the risk.

The materials are manufactured with North American safety standards and comply to our laws requirements.. and as you point out "the lack of headlines" should have a some merrit considering the rampant abuse of the millions of lithium devices out there.
|
... just this week, the NYPD had to pull thousands of bodycams because one started smoking (no injuries.) But those batteries don't really concern me.

I think that if I decide that a booster pack is a good idea, I'll just put it down in the Stow & Go well. I think that in the NY area it won't get excessive heat.



...... Agreed about the terms and conditions. If you want to participate, you must accept. Although I am skeptical how some of the most unreasonable terms and conditions would hold up in court - I am no lawyer. :|
It seems our esteemed judicial system IS letting those restrictions on class action suits and forced arbitration stand in many cases.......
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I just replaced the battery today on my 17 Touring L which was a rental in its prior duty (I bought it with 46k miles earlier this month). I went with an Interstate at Costco at $143.99. The procedure was pretty cut and dry- I was worried about the intake thingy but it came off without a problem. 10mm on all the nuts.

The van had died a week after I bought it. Since I knew the van was on the dealer lot since May I put it on a tender until fully charged but that did not seem to help as it was very inconsistent with doors opening when the ignition was off and the horn was muffled when setting the alarm from the keyfob. It also had a hard time turning over at start.
hmmm, I wonder if that battery is an AGM battery. His van doesn't have ESS. Judging by the price, I think it might not be. The AGM batteries seem to be more expensive than a regular lead/acid battery. But the big starting AGM battery does seem to be available at many locations. Finding the smaller ESS battery seems to be more difficult. Tried doing different kinds of searches for it and I think the only result is from Forum member @sjambok. I went to the Batteries Plus site and it doesn't seem to mention an ESS battery.
 

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hmmm, I wonder if that battery is an AGM battery. His van doesn't have ESS. Judging by the price, I think it might not be. The AGM batteries seem to be more expensive than a regular lead/acid battery. But the big starting AGM battery does seem to be available at many locations. Finding the smaller ESS battery seems to be more difficult. Tried doing different kinds of searches for it and I think the only result is from Forum member @sjambok. I went to the Batteries Plus site and it doesn't seem to mention an ESS battery.
Non-ESS vans don't have an AGM battery.
 

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ESS AUX Battery Replacement

I would still like someone that has the service manual to tell the exact steps for replacing the battery/batteries. It looks like there is one nut that holds the 'power distribution center' to the battery. Do you remove the ESS battery before the start battery? Or the other way around? Will the Pacifica run without the ESS battery? What is a replacement for the ESS battery?
As I didn't see ESS AUX replacement battery specifics here I wanted to share what I found. This thread helped a lot when my recently purchased 2017 Pacifica (gas) displayed the "Start/Stop Not Ready - Service..." alert during the first month. I don't have a manufacturer warranty so I removed the AUX battery (see pics in thread above - thanks!) and local Autozone confirmed it was bad. The van runs with the bad ESS battery - the Start/Stop just won't work. It just didn't look right to try it without any ESS battery so I put it back in the van for now and ordered a new battery. If you really hate ESS and don't mind the alert on your dash could you just leave the dead one in? It's AGM so it shouldn't leak but that didn't seem wise.

The OEM battery is a Deka battery made by East Penn and is an AGM 200 CCA 12 volt battery. Their website has helpful info about AUX batteries and why you might not want to use an alternative similar motorcycle battery (ETX). Look for AUX AGM batteries at - eastpennmanufacturing.com/applications/automotive/

Most warranties on batteries of this type said 6 months. The Chrysler dealer said 24 months but the cost was 50% higher and they may require $200 to install it too - I didn't ask.
I found mine at batteriesasap.com. I'll try to come back and let you know how it works.
 

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Conclusion, there is not any replacement for the crappy Mopar Battery. I hope that after two years of having this problem they have done something to fix the issue. I'm going today to the dealer to inspect my ESS battery.
 

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Update: As I mentioned earlier, I attempted to obtain an OEM Deka AUX battery from BatteriesASAP.com. I finally did receive a battery, about a month later - not asap. It was not the Deka battery - they said Deka was unavailable from the manufacturer - they sent a similar Big Dog AGM battery and refunded my money. It arrived with evidence it had been dropped both on it's bottom and on the very bent negative terminal. Luckily the posts from the old battery still screwed into the new one. I took the battery to Autozone and they charged it up first before I installed it. Once installed the Start/Stop functions normally. As this battery was free I'm not that concerned about it's lifespan. The Deka website literature talked about how their OEM battery is better for AUX purposes in vehicles as it has individually vented cells (to keep it cooler?) - not sure if this really matters or not - but I have no idea what kind of venting this "Big Dog" battery has. So I may be back again in year to try this all over again.
 

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anyone know the cost of the original equipment battery?
Mopar battery part number BB0H7730AB $173. ( CONVENTIONAL, Main, 730 Amp, 750 CCA, 730 Amp) was put in my 2017 non ESS van as a replacement for OEM battery that recently failed under warranty.

You can check the Mopar site to see which battery would go in your van if you need an AGM battery by searching parts and the price will be there.
 
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