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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,
Side mirror of another car hit the cord while backing out and cracked the receptacle. Couldn't find an answer to this on the forum except for someone who tried epoxy. This must happen frequently I would think. Attached are photos. Anyone have any experience with this? Thank you so much.

Edit:
I replaced the charge port cable to the on board charger. The charge port receptacle itself is not connectorized so unless you want to cut and splice wires, replacing the entire cable is necessary. The part is:
68232743ADCONNECTOR, WIRING. CHARGE PORT TO ON BOARD CHARGER, Electrical. High Voltage.
The cable doesn't actually connect to the on board charger, but to an extension cable, so it is not necessary to touch any of the modules/batteries, etc. Tools needed: jack, jack stands, tire iron, socket set (8-12 mm), long flat head screwdriver. Here are the steps:

1. Jack up front end
2. Remove left front wheel and fender liner
3. Remove charge port access door
4. Remove undercarriage cover
5. Remove cable (held in with push fittings and two nuts). The fittings accessible from the wheel well are easy enough; the push fittings underneath are pried out with a long screw driver from beneath the vehicle. One of the nuts is removed blindly, reaching around from the wheel well, using a 10 mm socket and fingers; a wrench wouldn't fit. This is the most difficult step.
6. Snaking the new cable through is actually quite easy. A bolt holding up the coolant lines which go to the charge module was temporarily loosened to allow passage of the fat end of the cable.

This took me four hours including set-up and clean up, but I suspect it could be done by one more adept in half the time.

Photos:

Broken receptacle:
Bicycle part Auto part Machine Nut Gas


Wheel off, fender liner retracted, cable exposed:
Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Aircraft


Just around the corner out of sight there is another nut like this one holding the cable:
Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Car Motor vehicle


Connection between cable to be replaced (right) and extension cable to charge module (left, view from underneath van, undercarriage cover removed):
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Light Automotive design Automotive exterior


To separate cables, pull out the white locking clip, press the center, and the two slide apart:
Watch Gas Machine Electric blue Cable


New charge port installed:
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Steering part
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
J View attachment 47741 View attachment 47742 View attachment 47743
[/QUOTE]
Part number 10 I’m assuming , any damage to the door or door surround @ the charge port area ?
The door and surround is fine. Just the receptacle is broken. It charges okay, just flops around now. I think it is part #10 but the drawing is so poor I can't be sure. It looks like the receptacle can be unplugged from the wires behind (they are just push fittings I believe). So all I really need is the plastic receptacle. Thanks!
J
 

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Trihawk, please be a bit careful there. The connector has to carry 30 amps during Level 2 charging. If the electrical connection is compromised, a 30A connection can easily get hot enough to start a fire. When you replace, make sure the back end connectors are on tight and the crimp connection of the wires has not been weakened. Inspect the whole cable and the opposite end connections as well, as everything would have been stressed when the connector was knocked off.

If you decide to get it repaired professionally, it will cost more, but maybe parts and labor would be covered by your collision insurance.
 
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this might be one of the very few times I'd pay a dealer to fix something. If you do anything wrong and a level 2 charger toasts your battery or onboard charger, $276 will seem like peanuts ;)
 

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this might be one of the very few times I'd pay a dealer to fix something.
If it was me, I would. Those high voltage lines aren't orange for no reason. Orange means death. ☠💀☠💀☠👻👻👻👻

I'll let the guys at the dealer with all the safety equipment, cones, safety parameter around the vehicle, and body rescue hook put their lives on the line working on this vehicle.

My grandfather that retired from the US Air Force working on military aircraft for over 40 years called Direct Current "Death Current"

The Pacifica's 360 DC volts would kill you fast. Even with all safety precautions in place, there would be very little chance of survival if it was to grab a hold of you. How much is your life worth?
 
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If it was me, I would. Those high voltage lines aren't orange for no reason. Orange means death. ☠💀☠💀☠👻👻👻👻

I'll let the guys at the dealer with all the safety equipment, cones, safety parameter around the vehicle, and body rescue hook put their lives on the line working on this vehicle.

My grandfather that retired from the US Air Force working on military aircraft for over 40 years called Direct Current "Death Current"

The Pacifica's 360 DC volts would kill you fast. Even with all safety precautions in place, there would be very little chance of survival if it was to grab a hold of you. How much is your life worth?
Isn't there a master breaker that shuts off all electricity from the traction battery in the event of an emergency? I vaguely recall this being an issue early on with hybrids like the Prius if there was some sort of situation where rescue personnel had to extricate people from a damaged vehicle.
 

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No doubt there is, but I'm sure they don't want Joe Blow van owner to do that sort of thing themselves.
 

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Isn't there a master breaker that shuts off all electricity from the traction battery in the event of an emergency? I vaguely recall this being an issue early on with hybrids like the Prius if there was some sort of situation where rescue personnel had to extricate people from a damaged vehicle.
Of course, there is a contactor inside the battery. You can hear it clicking when turning the ignition on or off. The van has so many safety interlocks it is virtually impossible to get electrocuted even if you wanted to. Furthermore, the charging port has no direct connection to the HV battery. It goes into the onboard charger module.
 

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Isn't there a master breaker that shuts off all electricity from the traction battery in the event of an emergency? I vaguely recall this being an issue early on with hybrids like the Prius if there was some sort of situation where rescue personnel had to extricate people from a damaged vehicle.
I think there's one in the second row floor iirc. I hope OP got the other person's info and let insurance deal with it.
 

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There is for service.

There is a specific procedure for partially powering down the system BEFORE pulling the "High-Voltage Manual Service Disconnect" for full power down. Removing the disconnect not properly or with the right equipment (lineman gloves) it can arc out of the hole and kill you. Plus there is an insulator Safety Cover 2035101082 that must be put over the exposed connectors for safety after removal.

This info below is from FCA when working on any part of the high voltage systems (Orange).

WARNING: When performing any repairs that involve contact with high
voltage components or systems, the technician performing repairs on the
vehicle must verify that the system remains powered down during high voltage
repairs. Strictly adhere to the following procedures:

1 To ensure that the vehicle is properly powered down, remove the service
disconnect.
2 The technician must always know the location of the service disconnect
throughout the repair.
3 The technician must ensure that no one reconnects the service disconnect
while service is being performed.
4 Any time the vehicle is unattended, prior to continuing with repair work,
the technician must recheck that the service disconnect has not been
reinstalled.

NOTE: Because the high-voltage battery is used to charge the 12-volt
battery via the Auxiliary Power Module (APM), disconnecting the 12-volt
battery negative cable will not power down the 12-volt system. The
following 12-Volt Power Down procedure MUST be performed before any
repairs, disassembly, or testing down are carried out.

NOTE: Even though the high-voltage battery manual service disconnect is
removed during the 12-Volt Power Down procedure, the 12-Volt Power
Down procedure will NOT safely and reliably power down the high-voltage
system. If any high-voltage components are to be accessed, disconnected or
tested, the High-Voltage Power Down procedure must first be carried out.


 
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I’d pay for the part and just have dealer install it . Last thing you need is a short , bad connection for charging purposes .
 

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The dealers around me will not install parts you bring with you even if they are OEM.
 

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These safety measures are completely valid and using them is the best practice. However, they are the third and fourth lines of defense against exposure to high voltage. Something very bad should happen for the high voltage to be where it shouldn't. Think the contactor welded in the "on" state by arcing or the HV battery shell failure from a bad accident. Even in these cases, it would be no HV on the charging receptacle. If the rear of it is connectorized, replacing it is less dangerous than plugging an EVSE into a wall outlet.
 

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I don't see that there is much high voltage electrical hazard in replacing the J1772 port. The J1772 port is never energized until the user actually plugs in their EVSE, and the van then gives the EVSE the OK to turn on.
The Chrysler Pacifica does not have a bi-directional HV battery charger on board, and so should not send any power back on the J1772 port under normal circumstances.

Like stop-eject said, if the PacHy J1772 port is connectorized, it should be a rather straightforward replacement. If it is not connectorized, it will be more complicated, and the end user must ensure that the connections to the new J1772 port are of high quality, up to OEM specs, and terminated with the correct wire on each terminal.

I'd be curious to know if this port is connectorized, in the off chance mine ever needs replacement. Hope the original poster lets us know!
 

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I don't see that there is much high voltage electrical hazard in replacing the J1772 port. The J1772 port is never energized until the user actually plugs in their EVSE, and the van then gives the EVSE the OK to turn on.
The Chrysler Pacifica does not have a bi-directional HV battery charger on board, and so should not send any power back on the J1772 port under normal circumstances.

Like stop-eject said, if the PacHy J1772 port is connectorized, it should be a rather straightforward replacement. If it is not connectorized, it will be more complicated, and the end user must ensure that the connections to the new J1772 port are of high quality, up to OEM specs, and terminated with the correct wire on each terminal.

I'd be curious to know if this port is connectorized, in the off chance mine ever needs replacement. Hope the original poster lets us know!
Same here. TBH, one would think this is an event that is foreseen by the manufacturer and they'd make the port replaceable without a huge amount of effort.

I mean, having the connector taken out when a J1772 plug is struck isn't all that much different from having an exterior rearview mirror damaged. IOW, it's going to happen occasionally.
 

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Would you stick your hand in engine bay if you were changing a alternator , starter and not disconnect the battery . Sometimes a simple extra step is difference between success and hindsight , just saying .
 

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Agreed, disconnecting the 12V battery is a 100% must do step when changing a starter or alternator.
Full 12V power is always available, all the time, at pretty much maximum battery amperage at both of these locations, if you don't disconnect the 12V battery.
To not disconnect it would be unsafe and asking for trouble.
 

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Would you stick your hand in engine bay if you were changing a alternator , starter and not disconnect the battery . Sometimes a simple extra step is difference between success and hindsight , just saying .
False equivalency. The starter assembly is wired directly to the battery with a thick wire. Shorting it to any nearby metal part will cause a fire or explosion. Replacing the 1772 socket is safer than replacing a tailight bulb. There is simply no way to electrify this socket by accident. Unless attempting to replace while charging :)
 

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False equivalency. The starter assembly is wired directly to the battery with a thick wire. Shorting it to any nearby metal part will cause a fire or explosion. Replacing the 1772 socket is safer than replacing a tailight bulb. There is simply no way to electrify this socket by accident. Unless attempting to replace while charging :)
That’s awesome because you best tell the fca mechanics this . because the mopar repair states to power down the vehicle .
 
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