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I own a Prius V, onto which I installed a catalytic converter cover as a theft deterrent because in California theft has become a real issue.

I am new to Chrysler cars and was wondering if such covers (like the MillerCat cover) exist for the Pacifica. A Google search has not yielded any relevant result. Thank you!
 

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2018 Chrysler Pacifica Touring L
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I own a Prius V, onto which I installed a catalytic converter cover as a theft deterrent because in California theft has become a real issue.

I am new to Chrysler cars and was wondering if such covers (like the MillerCat cover) exist for the Pacifica. A Google search has not yielded any relevant result. Thank you!
The catalytic converters are integrated into the exhaust manifolds on the Pacifica. I doubt any thief would waste their time with them because they're way too difficult to remove. Unlike many other vehicles, they can't be cut off in a few minutes. The labor guide says it's a 2 hour job to replace each manifold. Add another half hour if it's a hybrid. The underbody panels also add another obstacle for them to overcome.
 

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2021 Maximum Steel Pacifica Hybrid Limited
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The catalytic converters are integrated into the exhaust manifolds on the Pacifica. I doubt any thief would waste their time with them because they're way too difficult to remove. Unlike many other vehicles, they can't be cut off in a few minutes. The labor guide says it's a 2 hour job to replace each manifold. Add another half hour if it's a hybrid. The underbody panels also add another obstacle for them to overcome.
I'm so happy to see that! Catalytic converters are being stolen like crazy around here.
 

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The Prius is a popular model to swipe them from because of their hybrid nature. A Prius with, say, 100k miles will have much less miles on its catalytic converter because it has been run in electric mode so often, so this might be more of a concern for Pachys. Also, I wonder if the low ground clearance of our Pacificas is a deterrent, although some crafty thieves use unmarked tow trucks to raise vehicles up for access after towing them to a inconspicuous spot.
 

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The Prius is a popular model to swipe them from because of their hybrid nature. A Prius with, say, 100k miles will have much less miles on its catalytic converter because it has been run in electric mode so often, so this might be more of a concern for Pachys. Also, I wonder if the low ground clearance of our Pacificas is a deterrent, although some crafty thieves use unmarked tow trucks to raise vehicles up for access after towing them to a inconspicuous spot.
Why would whether or not a vehicle is a hybrid or a low use/low mileage cat even be a factor? Thieves don't resell them for normal use anyways. They sell them for scrap due to the value of the precious materials inside them (rhodium, palladium, and platinum). Two of those three materials are currently worth more per ounce than gold. The EPA prohibits the sale and installation of used catalytic converters unless they are refurbished and certified by an approved manufacturer.
 

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My understanding is the reason why catalytic converters don't last forever is that the precious metals break down after many miles.
 

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My understanding is the reason why catalytic converters don't last forever is that the precious metals break down after many miles.
I didn't say they don't wear out, but they usually don't unless they become contaminated due to lack of engine up keep or sustain physical damage. Regardless, my point was that a thief doesn't care about mileage/wear. They're going for low hanging fruit from multiple vehicles in most cases. The catalytic converter can be easily cut off many models with a racing jack and cordless reciprocating saw in a matter of seconds. The popularity of SUVs has increased the number of easy targets.
 

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For those not understanding the issues going on here, YES, catalytic converters (cats) thefts are a huge thing now. The price of the precious metals has risen significantly in the past few years. Initially, widespread reports of theft started in California but now include most other states.


The EPA prohibits the sale and installation of used catalytic converters unless they are refurbished and certified by an approved manufacturer.
If it's visually a OEM cat (new or used), it will pass. In California, owners MUST replace the missing cats with a OEM unit only. Toyota dealer prices are around $3000. Yup. Needless to say, used OEM cats that will pass emission testing has risen in value significantly. To the point that some owners with older, cheap Prius that don't live in a CARB state are now selling their (nearly used up) cats for upwards of $1500 on ebay, installing a $300 aftermarket, and pocketing the diff. or (if they're wise and keeping the car) putting the proceeds towards a new HV battery.

FWIW
 

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with a racing jack and cordless reciprocating saw in a matter of seconds
That's what I though too but those make WAY too much noise. Instead, they use a nearly silent by comparison chain pipe cutter with diamond teeth. Cheap too ($25 @ HF). If there's enough working room, the ratchet style chain cutter + electric impact wrench would be even faster still.
 

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I didn't say they don't wear out, but they usually don't unless they become contaminated due to lack of engine up keep or sustain physical damage. Regardless, my point was that a thief doesn't care about mileage/wear. They're going for low hanging fruit from multiple vehicles in most cases. The catalytic converter can be easily cut off many models with a racing jack and cordless reciprocating saw in a matter of seconds. The popularity of SUVs has increased the number of easy targets.
Try this. From Minneapolis Star Tribune:
"Repairs can run from a few hundred dollars to nearly $3,000, Larson said. The most common vehicles entering his shop are the Toyota Prius, Honda CRV and Mitsubishi Outlander.

The Prius has long been a favorite target locally and nationally because their engines don’t run as much, meaning the precious metals inside take longer to burn out. Toyota spokesman Nathan Kokes called catalytic converter theft “an industrywide challenge” and something the company continues to monitor “as the safety and security of our customers are top priorities.”
 
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