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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Level 2 charger will not release from the vehicle. I thought there might be a problem with the release button on the charger, but I ruled out that possibility by shutting off the breaker and disassembling the charger handle. I noticed a bit of a burnt smell after I opened up the handle.

Based on another posting
( Public Charger Wouldn't Release (Cut it off..) )
I wonder if there might have been overheating where the charger plugs into the vehicle, so that the charger may have become fused to the charging port.

Does that make sense to any of the technicians out there? Does anyone have any advice or any alternative explanations for why the charger does not pull out?

Some additional information:
  • I have been using my Mustart 32A Level 2 charger for almost 3 years
  • Have owned the 2018 Pacifica for three years and two weeks, i.e. I am two weeks out of warranty.

Timetable:
-- On Saturday night, the vehicle charged only to 30 miles instead of the usual 34. That has happened occasionally in the past as well.
-- On Sunday night, the battery charged to only about 24 miles.
-- On Monday night, I plugged the charger in at about 9pm. The battery was fully discharged, but the vehicle should have cooled down by the time it started charging on schedule at 11:15 pm.
-- On Tuesday, the vehicle was fully charged but the charger could not be pulled out.

Does the vehicle have features to protect from overheating while charging?
Would a 16A charger be less likely to have an overheating problem than a 32A charger?

Any advice, theories, or explanations will be welcome.
 

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2020 Hybrid Touring L
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I have a Chevy Bolt, check out below thread going on there, among others RE: mustart

 

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Does the vehicle have features to protect from overheating while charging?
Would a 16A charger be less likely to have an overheating problem than a 32A charger?

Any advice, theories, or explanations will be welcome.
The vehicle protects the battery while charging by running the fan and coolant. It doesn't protect the charging port.

It is the faulty EVSE that's causing the problem.

Did you charge another vehicle with the same charger? What gauge wiring is from the breaker to the plug?
 

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Just yesterday, the charger from a ChargePoint station got stuck in my port. I called the support line, they have told me to hit the lock button on the key fob 4-5 times. I did and it released the charger.

Not sure if this is your exact issue, but I’d give it a shot. I had zero confidence it would work when she told me that, but it worked immediately. Turns out the ChargePoint station was defective and essentially out of sequence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It would have been interesting to try the key fob technique, but I had already pulled the charger out by force. There is scorching on the charger and charging port by one of the pins, so it appears that the charger had become fused to the port at that point.

This is the only vehicle the charger has been used with, and the only charger that has been used with the vehicle (aside from the level 1 charger that came with the vehicle that I used before the level 2 charger was installed). The charger is hard-wired using the heavy-gauge cord that it came with.
 

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Unlike many other cars, PacHy doesn't have a locking mechanism for the charger plugs. If the release lever isn't working it is a charger issue. Melted and fused together is a different issue. It can be caused by a defect in the plug or receptacle. I'm afraid you'll have a hard time trying to claim the latter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Now I have an additional issue. Last night I tried starting the vehicle to see if I would be able to drive it to the dealer with the charger still attached. When it did not come on, the screen said to press the start button with the key fob. The car came to the 'on' position but was not ready to drive. As I was trying to turn it off, the brake pedal stiffened and released a few times, and the vehicle eventually went to the off position.

Today, the vehicle is totally dead. Screen does not light, brake pedal stiff, no response to any of the buttons or the key fob, does not lock or unlock, cannot open tailgate. (An apparent oversight by the engineers to have a tailgate that cannot be unlocked and opened manually when the electrical system is dead.)

What should be done to prepare the vehicle to be towed to the dealer?
 

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Did anyone read my post????

Mustart chargers are damaging charge ports...end of story.
 

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Now I have an additional issue. Last night I tried starting the vehicle to see if I would be able to drive it to the dealer with the charger still attached. When it did not come on, the screen said to press the start button with the key fob. The car came to the 'on' position but was not ready to drive. As I was trying to turn it off, the brake pedal stiffened and released a few times, and the vehicle eventually went to the off position.

Today, the vehicle is totally dead. Screen does not light, brake pedal stiff, no response to any of the buttons or the key fob, does not lock or unlock, cannot open tailgate. (An apparent oversight by the engineers to have a tailgate that cannot be unlocked and opened manually when the electrical system is dead.)

What should be done to prepare the vehicle to be towed to the dealer?
Sounds like the 12V battery is dead now. Maybe the damaged charging port and monitoring system drew current from it overnight. You could try a jumper box on the 12 V terminals under the hood, but if it were mine I wouldn't consider it safe to drive. Flatbed tow truck and dollies looks like the only way, and have your wallet ready.

By the way, if the damage was caused by a sudden electrical fault, and you have evidence of fire/sparks on that connector, just maybe your insurance (car or homeowners) might cover it. Worth checking?
 

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Now I have an additional issue. Last night I tried starting the vehicle to see if I would be able to drive it to the dealer with the charger still attached. When it did not come on, the screen said to press the start button with the key fob. The car came to the 'on' position but was not ready to drive. As I was trying to turn it off, the brake pedal stiffened and released a few times, and the vehicle eventually went to the off position.

Today, the vehicle is totally dead. Screen does not light, brake pedal stiff, no response to any of the buttons or the key fob, does not lock or unlock, cannot open tailgate. (An apparent oversight by the engineers to have a tailgate that cannot be unlocked and opened manually when the electrical system is dead.)

What should be done to prepare the vehicle to be towed to the dealer?
Hello @kdlansing,
If we can be of any assistance while in service, please feel free to send us a direct message. We'd be glad to help.

Lamar
Chrysler Cares
 

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Good luck with that one , if it was the oem charger level 1 or 2 then I’d say it’s a warranty thing . This is caused by the charger , as stated by the previous member .
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
An automotive engineer I talked with thinks that the problem was probably arcing caused by a bit of dirt. (His specialty is welding though, not hybrids.) That can occur with any charger, which might explain why some of the similar problems reported on the Internet with overheating and melting of the charger or charging port involved uber-expensive public chargers. He suggested using a grease called Lubriplate DE-ES to prevent this. What do folks on the PacHy forum think? Would the grease attract and hold onto dirt that might otherwise drop away? Would it be suitable for an application where the charger is disconnected and re-connected every day?
 

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I would say that grease , depending on its particular composition , would hold dirt and maybe perpetuate the issue . Your really at the mercy of the plug and visually inspecting it’s charging handle head . There’s been lots of times that even the gasket is shy and you can physically tell the difference when inserting into the port
 

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Now I have an additional issue. Last night I tried starting the vehicle to see if I would be able to drive it to the dealer with the charger still attached. When it did not come on, the screen said to press the start button with the key fob. The car came to the 'on' position but was not ready to drive. As I was trying to turn it off, the brake pedal stiffened and released a few times, and the vehicle eventually went to the off position.

Today, the vehicle is totally dead. Screen does not light, brake pedal stiff, no response to any of the buttons or the key fob, does not lock or unlock, cannot open tailgate. (An apparent oversight by the engineers to have a tailgate that cannot be unlocked and opened manually when the electrical system is dead.)

What should be done to prepare the vehicle to be towed to the dealer?
Although this sounds like a different issue, it's worth noting that it's not possible to drive a plug-in vehicle with it plugged-in, even if there's no power to the EVSE.

On a J1772 plug, the three larger pins are for power, but the two smaller pins at the 8 and 4 o'clock positions are there to prevent putting the vehicle in gear when plugged-in. Knowing this, it's irritating when there is a broken plug handle and someone will claim it was due to the EV driving away with it still plugged into the port, a la driving away from a gas station with the nozzle still in the fuel-filler opening.
 

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Did anyone read my post????

Mustart chargers are damaging charge ports...end of story.
I'm not sure it's "end of story", but I've read enough about Mustart EVSEs (someone referred to them as 'MustMelt') to know to avoid them. It's unfortunate because, besides a lower price, Mustarts are more versatile in that they offer more plug-type choices than typical EVSEs.

Frankly, using any of the cheapo, non-UL-rated, Chinese-sourced, ebay or Amazon EVSEs is more of a gamble than using a higher-priced, brand-name, UL-rated unit like Juicebox, ChargePoint, or Clipper Creek.
 

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I'm not sure it's "end of story", but I've read enough about Mustart EVSEs (someone referred to them as 'MustMelt') to know to avoid them. It's unfortunate because, besides a lower price, Mustarts are more versatile in that they offer more plug-type choices than typical EVSEs.

Frankly, using any of the cheapo, non-UL-rated, Chinese-sourced, ebay or Amazon EVSEs is more of a gamble than using a higher-priced, brand-name, UL-rated unit like Juicebox, ChargePoint, or Clipper Creek.
If what some of you are saying about Mustart chargers is true you'd expect a terrible rating on Amazon for the product. Which isn't the case. Mustart chargers as as highly rated as any other charger. They have lightning protection, overvoltage, overheating, and overcurrent protection. I imagine if someone ever has a problem with a product like this they will be certain to go back and give it an appropriate review. Do you have any data to support that more people have problems with Mustart than with Juicebox, ChargePoint, and Clipper Creek? Why, even the thread referenced by @Anderd , the person with the problem came back and reported the problem was with the Nema plug, and that he has replaced the 30A with a 50A plug. He specifically states the problem was NOT with the Mustart charger. When you put a product like this in the hands of your average person, into homes with who knows the state of their wiring, or hooking up extension cords or not following speficiations, you'll encounter some problems. So stop spreading the misinformation that "Mustart EVSEs are a huge problem." They are not. I have a 40amp model I use successfully with my Pachy as well as a BEV. Barely gets warm when charging either vehicle. The cabling in the Mustart 40A model is incredibly thick and high quality. The wiring in my house is modern and good quality. If you want to spend more money on a charger because it makes you feel better, fine, but please don't spread misinformation to try to justify your purchase to the rest of us. It isn't helpful, at all.
 

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I'm not sure it's "end of story", but I've read enough about Mustart EVSEs (someone referred to them as 'MustMelt') to know to avoid them. It's unfortunate because, besides a lower price, Mustarts are more versatile in that they offer more plug-type choices than typical EVSEs.

Frankly, using any of the cheapo, non-UL-rated, Chinese-sourced, ebay or Amazon EVSEs is more of a gamble than using a higher-priced, brand-name, UL-rated unit like Juicebox, ChargePoint, or Clipper Creek.
Saving a few bucks sometimes isn’t worth the peace of mind , especially when you have invested how much into any electric vehicle
 

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If what some of you are saying about Mustart chargers is true you'd expect a terrible rating on Amazon for the product. Which isn't the case. Mustart chargers as as highly rated as any other charger. They have lightning protection, overvoltage, overheating, and overcurrent protection. I imagine if someone ever has a problem with a product like this they will be certain to go back and give it an appropriate review. Do you have any data to support that more people have problems with Mustart than with Juicebox, ChargePoint, and Clipper Creek? Why, even the thread referenced by @Anderd , the person with the problem came back and reported the problem was with the Nema plug, and that he has replaced the 30A with a 50A plug. He specifically states the problem was NOT with the Mustart charger. When you put a product like this in the hands of your average person, into homes with who knows the state of their wiring, or hooking up extension cords or not following speficiations, you'll encounter some problems. So stop spreading the misinformation that "Mustart EVSEs are a huge problem." They are not. I have a 40amp model I use successfully with my Pachy as well as a BEV. Barely gets warm when charging either vehicle. The cabling in the Mustart 40A model is incredibly thick and high quality. The wiring in my house is modern and good quality. If you want to spend more money on a charger because it makes you feel better, fine, but please don't spread misinformation to try to justify your purchase to the rest of us. It isn't helpful, at all.
Amazon reviews are well known to be manipulated so the star ratings are meaningless. How many products do you find on Amazon that have truly abysmal reviews? Yet I’ve had plenty of products delivered that were not at all as described. This is especially prevalent in electronics because the shoddy work can be hidden behind molded plastic and 99% of consumers wouldn’t know the difference if they could. That’s not to say that plenty of people won’t have problems - it’s likely that a reputable company manufacturers to a tolerance where there is something like 0.1% or less risk of electrical defect. A bargain charger might accept 1% or more.

Even a faulty phone charger is capable of starting a fire, so I don’t fool around with discount chargers for any device. Saving $200-300 on an EV charger to plug in to a $50k van charging inside my home is not worth the risk. Not by a long shot.
 

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Amazon reviews are well known to be manipulated so the star ratings are meaningless. How many products do you find on Amazon that have truly abysmal reviews? Yet I’ve had plenty of products delivered that were not at all as described. This is especially prevalent in electronics because the shoddy work can be hidden behind molded plastic and 99% of consumers wouldn’t know the difference if they could. That’s not to say that plenty of people won’t have problems - it’s likely that a reputable company manufacturers to a tolerance where there is something like 0.1% or less risk of electrical defect. A bargain charger might accept 1% or more.
Most Amazon reviews are by actual people who have purchased the product, which is even indicated on the Amazon site. In a very few rare instances a product may be manipulated by the seller, but you can generally tell those, by not being verified purchases, by the Chinglish, etc. Mustart reviews I have read do not have those characteristics. So you are taking something that happens occasionally to other products and applying it to something you have a bias against. Where are you more likely to find honest reviews, both good and bad? Amazon, or the manufacturer website? Many manufacturers will not allow harsh reviews to exist on their website (product failure, etc) or will at least remove some of them. So if you want to talk manipulation of reviews, there you go.

As to reputable companies, what makes ChargePoint or Mustart or JuiceBox more reputable than the other? And regarding charging tolerances, is that just a feeling, or do you have actual data to back up your statements?

Even a faulty phone charger is capable of starting a fire, so I don’t fool around with discount chargers for any device. Saving $200-300 on an EV charger to plug in to a $50k van charging inside my home is not worth the risk. Not by a long shot.
To each his own. Me, I'll apply a little common sense and do some research because I'm not the type to waste my money. Which is why when I need to buy phone charging cables, I read reviews on Amazon, buy quality off-brand cables, 5 for $10 for my iPhone, and in color black, which I prefer for the insides of my vehicles, so the cords don't stand out. I could easily afford to spend $150 for 5 Apple-branded cables, but why would I spend $140 needlessly when I can buy something that performs just as well and lasts just as long? You may wonder why I would I risk my $1200 phone on a $2 cable. Because I don't let unfounded, irrational fears drive my purchasing decisions.
 

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Most Amazon reviews are by actual people who have purchased the product, which is even indicated on the Amazon site. In a very few rare instances a product may be manipulated by the seller, but you can generally tell those, by not being verified purchases, by the Chinglish, etc. Mustart reviews I have read do not have those characteristics. So you are taking something that happens occasionally to other products and applying it to something you have a bias against. Where are you more likely to find honest reviews, both good and bad? Amazon, or the manufacturer website? Many manufacturers will not allow harsh reviews to exist on their website (product failure, etc) or will at least remove some of them. So if you want to talk manipulation of reviews, there you go.

As to reputable companies, what makes ChargePoint or Mustart or JuiceBox more reputable than the other? And regarding charging tolerances, is that just a feeling, or do you have actual data to back up your statements?



To each his own. Me, I'll apply a little common sense and do some research because I'm not the type to waste my money. Which is why when I need to buy phone charging cables, I read reviews on Amazon, buy quality off-brand cables, 5 for $10 for my iPhone, and in color black, which I prefer for the insides of my vehicles, so the cords don't stand out. I could easily afford to spend $150 for 5 Apple-branded cables, but why would I spend $140 needlessly when I can buy something that performs just as well and lasts just as long? You may wonder why I would I risk my $1200 phone on a $2 cable. Because I don't let unfounded, irrational fears drive my purchasing decisions.
Your comments regarding how easy you think it is to filter out bogus Amazon reviews are way out of date. Manipulation of reviews is a major business, and a major problem for Amazon. It’s way past the age where you could simply filter out the ones that had obvious spelling or grammar issues.

For most other electronic equipment there are reviews available from electronics engineers who have taken apart the devices - and exposed the dangerous design flaws. The fact that this happens regularly with Amazon products makes this a very well founded, rational concern.

Has anyone done the same for the Mustart charger?
 
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