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2020 35th Anniversary Touring L Plus
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Brought in the vehicle for regular oil change and I also asked for tires to be rotated.

Upon picking up the car the service staff told me that they did not rotate the tire, and in their words "because it is not needed".

The reasoning felt contrarian to common sense. I felt like I was taken for a fool.

My Pacifica is at 17,000 miles. The first rotation was done at 7,000 miles. So it's been another 10,000 miles since then. The inspection report indicated the tread depth for front tires is greater than the rear tires, which is hard to believe (and I took that as their implied reason for not needing to rotate tire).

Is it normal to skip tire rotation given the situation above?
 
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FWD- Yes
AWD- No

Friend who worked as a Honda tech said he'd automatically rotate them as he had the wheels off for brakes check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's a drop off (not appointment). I think it's marketed as the Mopar oil change "express lane".
 

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I had the same issue when I took my car for rotation at Costco. My front tires are 7/32 and rear ones 10/32 and they said for tire rotation it should not exceed 2/32. They told that tires get wear out depending on the load. If you use more cargo then rear tires will were out soon
 

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Yes, it actually does make sense.

The front tires will always wear faster on a FWD vehicle. The same is also true for many AWD vehicles because many of them are not a true full-time AWD vehicles. They're primarily FWD and the rear wheels are only driven when the conditions permit it.

I don't believe in rotating the tires at fixed intervals (mileage, every other oil change, once per year, etc.). It makes no sense to do so because the mileage at which you really need to rotate them varies based on driving habits and the composition of the tires themselves. Performance biased tires have a softer tread compound that wears faster than those that are biased toward treadlife. I just measure the wear with a tread depth indicator and go off of that. I wait until the first 1/32" is worn off the front tires then rotate them when the front tires have 1/32" less tread than the rear. I generally only end up needing to rotate the tires less than a handful of times during the lifespan of the tires because of this.

On a related subject, I also disagree with the tire experts that say you want the tires with the most tread on the back. I understand their reasoning for this, but if you really stuck to it, you'd never rotate a set of tires on a FWD vehicle. You'd just put a new pair of tires on the back and move the old rear tires up front every time the front tires wore out.
 

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I think just sticking with the 5000 mile tie rotation , again depending on driving habits and vehicle usage , is probably the easiest plan to stick too . Tire inflation , driving style , usage all play into wear . So if you want the tires rotated then rotate them .
 

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Brought in the vehicle for regular oil change and I also asked for tires to be rotated.

Upon picking up the car the service staff told me that they did not rotate the tire, and in their words "because it is not needed".

The reasoning felt contrarian to common sense. I felt like I was taken for a fool.

My Pacifica is at 17,000 miles. The first rotation was done at 7,000 miles. So it's been another 10,000 miles since then. The inspection report indicated the tread depth for front tires is greater than the rear tires, which is hard to believe (and I took that as their implied reason for not needing to rotate tire).

Is it normal to skip tire rotation given the situation above?
What was the depth reading for each tire? If you don't trust them, get your own depth gauge and measure it yourself.
 

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I saw the subject line and thought "Who would trigger if I used 'tyre'.". That is probably a banned subject. Too controversial and discussed way too much.
Personally I use the move the rear tires forward but I've already bought some winter tires for the front. Those will be going on shortly.
 

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I saw the subject line and thought "Who would trigger if I used 'tyre'.". That is probably a banned subject. Too controversial and discussed way too much.
Personally I use the move the rear tires forward but I've already bought some winter tires for the front. Those will be going on shortly.
[/QUOTE
Winter tires on the front and all seasons on the back ?
 

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That's ridiculous. You asked for a tire rotation, they should have rotated the tires...period.
 

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On a related subject, I also disagree with the tire experts that say you want the tires with the most tread on the back. I understand their reasoning for this, but if you really stuck to it, you'd never rotate a set of tires on a FWD vehicle. You'd just put a new pair of tires on the back and move the old rear tires up front every time the front tires wore out.
Tires are like brakes. They often get ignored until they either make noise or fail in an emergency. This is why I now agree with the tire experts. I have seen enough grief to never stretch life to wear limits and better tread always goes on the rear for emergency steer and brake stability. I DO rotate, but left to right only, not a universal pattern. I do exactly as you surmise with a front wheel drive vehicle. When any hint of hydroplaning occurs (always before wear limits are reached), I buy new tires in pairs that go on the rear. Rear tires are always receiving less wear and are moved and crossed to the front. At roughly half the "useful" tread wear, I rotate left to right. So there are 2 rotations for each tire pair during their life: a cross rotation as the tires are moved to the front at purchase and a left/right only rotation at mid life.
 

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CANADAHYBRIDGUY: Recently I bought a full set and already had bought two super basic steel rim winter tires from a friend. He didn't need them anymore after someone burnt down his van and camper. Once it is time to put on the all-seasons I will evaluate tread and location. That front wheel traction is handy when pulling onto the highway.

Question. If you didn't have to be concerned with tire replacement, would the winter tires actually give more traction than summer or all-season tires on the pavement? Will winter tires always have the most grip?
 

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CANADAHYBRIDGUY: Recently I bought a full set and already had bought two super basic steel rim winter tires from a friend. He didn't need them anymore after someone burnt down his van and camper. Once it is time to put on the all-seasons I will evaluate tread and location. That front wheel traction is handy when pulling onto the highway.

Question. If you didn't have to be concerned with tire replacement, would the winter tires actually give more traction than summer or all-season tires on the pavement? Will winter tires always have the most grip?
It is always recommended to have tires be as close to identical on the front and back of a vehicle. You do not want one end to lose traction before the other because you will also lose control of the vehicle when this happens. If you are going to use snow tires, they should be on all four corners.

Snow tires have better grip in temperatures below 7 degrees Celsius. So if you live in an area with extended winter periods with those temps, winter tires are the best solution.
 

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Brought in the vehicle for regular oil change and I also asked for tires to be rotated.

Upon picking up the car the service staff told me that they did not rotate the tire, and in their words "because it is not needed".

The reasoning felt contrarian to common sense. I felt like I was taken for a fool.

My Pacifica is at 17,000 miles. The first rotation was done at 7,000 miles. So it's been another 10,000 miles since then. The inspection report indicated the tread depth for front tires is greater than the rear tires, which is hard to believe (and I took that as their implied reason for not needing to rotate tire).

Is it normal to skip tire rotation given the situation above?
No.

May my dealership, the oil/oil filter change service automatically gets a tire rotation, too.

For a front wheel drive car, the front wheels are doing both the driving and the steering, so it’s critical to have good tread forward. Only time I would ask them not to do it is if fir some strange reason tread on the rears is worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The pacifica being a FWD, it's hard to believe that the tread on the rear is worse. And to the point that the dealer would go out of their way to decline a rotation?
I can't help but to think that they declined out of ulterior motives.
  • Maybe they didn't want to spend too much time on each car at the express oil change lane because it was a Saturaday.
  • Or maybe they saw my out-of-state plate and think I'm unlikely a returning customer so they don't want to rotate it for the stated price ($20).
I don't know. Just speculations. But I hope to understand the dealer's business motive so next time I can identify one that would work favorably on my behalf.
This dealer has the highest number of reviews in google map (about 2000 reviews). The experience just makes it difficult to trust that dealers have your car's best interest, nor trusting the reviews.
 
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