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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any DIY'ers who have braved a coolant flush yet? I see there are 3 reservoirs. Two of which have caps which indicate not to open and then the standard reservoir which is accessible. Would be helpful to know if they all flow through the main reservoir or if they have to be filled independently.

Separate bleeding required for each as well? Would love to see a screenshot of the Repair Manual Procedures if anyone has a copy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So the standard coolant reservoir works the same as a standard gas engine and can be changed as usual. It's the other two cooling systems to the electronic and the high voltage battery that have separate reservoirs and must be changed by the dealer using vacuum pressure. Two local dealers quoted me at $510 and $570. All my local independents wouldn't touch it so far

Then happened upon one Chrysler dealer who is charging 190. I'm skeptical but made the appointment and will see how that goes.
 

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Just be sure that the dealer charging 190 has understood you are talking about the Hybrid's battery cooling system.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just be sure that the dealer charging 190 has understood you are talking about the Hybrid's battery cooling system.
That was my first concern! I had them assure me they were aware it's the Hybrid and that it's the two closed systems not the open system to the gas engine. They confirmed but I'm still not confident.
 

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That was my first concern! I had them assure me they were aware it's the Hybrid and that it's the two closed systems not the open system to the gas engine. They confirmed but I'm still not confident.
Not only do they need to pull a vacuum, you also generally have to connect a service computer to command the coolant pump to turn on at full speed to ensure all the air is evacuated. That’s also very common on any battery electric vehicle. The days of a self-purging system are probably numbered.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not only do they need to pull a vacuum, you also generally have to connect a service computer to command the coolant pump to turn on at full speed to ensure all the air is evacuated. That’s also very common on any battery electric vehicle. The days of a self-purging system are probably numbered.
So I just changed the coolant for the gas engine and that was self-purging. What's the difference?
 

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So I just changed the coolant for the gas engine and that was self-purging. What's the difference?
Of course ICE vehicles or engines are self purging. But anything with a liquid cooled battery and power electronics loops likely won’t be. Like the Pacifica or every battery electric.
 

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So I just changed the coolant for the gas engine and that was self-purging. What's the difference?
So imagine that coolant travels from point A to point B in a system. If the route is fairly direct between the two points then it will likely self purge. But if it’s a complicated route or even several routes between the two points, now imagine an air pocket in there somewhere. If, because of the route the coolant takes, the air pocket remains and doesn’t purge when the coolant flows you’ll have a hot spot. Gotta get all the air out so the coolant can cool everything.
 

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So imagine that coolant travels from point A to point B in a system. If the route is fairly direct between the two points then it will likely self purge. But if it’s a complicated route or even several routes between the two points, now imagine an air pocket in there somewhere. If, because of the route the coolant takes, the air pocket remains and doesn’t purge when the coolant flows you’ll have a hot spot. Gotta get all the air out so the coolant can cool everything.
An engine also has a pretty high flow rate. The battery and power electronics loops generally have much lower flow rates. So they are less likely to be able to “push” an air bubble out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So imagine that coolant travels from point A to point B in a system. If the route is fairly direct between the two points then it will likely self purge. But if it’s a complicated route or even several routes between the two points, now imagine an air pocket in there somewhere. If, because of the route the coolant takes, the air pocket remains and doesn’t purge when the coolant flows you’ll have a hot spot. Gotta get all the air out so the coolant can cool everything.
Awesome. Thanks for the visual. Makes it much easier to understand the dynamics.
 

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It would be nice to have a description of the process by which coolant is purged and replaced in these vehicles. With the right tools it shouldn’t be that difficult of a job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It would be nice to have a description of the process by which coolant is purged and replaced in these vehicles. With the right tools it shouldn’t be that difficult of a job.
I have yet to get my hands on the PacHY Repair/Service Manual but if it calls for the same vacuum based tool that it calls for in the Standard Repair Manual then maybe it's not more complicated than picking up one of these:

UVU550000, Airlift™ Cooling System Vacuum / Filller Kit - Mopar Essential Tools and Service Equipment
 

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It would be nice to have a description of the process by which coolant is purged and replaced in these vehicles. With the right tools it shouldn’t be that difficult of a job.
I’m guessing that for the Hybrid you’d need wiTech to do it properly. Even on the engine loop there are valves and pumps and the ECH. If you don’t cycle those they are going to trap coolant in parts of the system and it’ll be an incomplete job. I’d also guess that there’s a purging procedure for the even the engine loop because of the ECH and pump and valves in that loop.

If TechAuthority doesn’t have service info yet, you could look at AllData.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It would be nice to have a description of the process by which coolant is purged and replaced in these vehicles. With the right tools it shouldn’t be that difficult of a job.
This diagram should help:
Wheel Tire Motor vehicle Automotive tire Urban design


The Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) heating and cooling requirements are managed with a combination of three interrelated cooling system loops and the vehicles HVAC refrigerant system to provide temperature control of the gas engine, passenger compartment, high voltage battery, power electronics and transmission.

  • The High Temperature Coolant Loop (1) combines an Electric Coolant Heater (ECH) to the traditional gasoline engine cooling system to provide heat to the passenger compartment and the high voltage battery when the engine is not operating (Refer to 07 - Cooling/Engine/Description and Operation) .
  • The Battery Coolant Loop (2) obtains heat from a heat exchanger in the High Temperature Coolant Loop and gives up heat through a heat exchanger (chiller) in the HVAC refrigerant system (Refer to 07 - Cooling/Battery/Description and Operation) .
  • The HVAC refrigerant system (3) can function when the engine is not operating to remove heat from the passenger compartment and the high voltage battery (Refer to 24 - Heating and Air Conditioning/Description and Operation) .
  • The Power Electronics Coolant Loop (4) removes heat generated by the electric drive controls and also has a heat exchanger to provide transmission cooling (Refer to 07 - Cooling/Power Electronics/Description and Operation) .
OPERATION
As part of the High Temperature Coolant Loop the engine cooling system regulates engine operating temperature. It allows the engine to reach normal operating temperature as quickly as possible, maintains normal operating temperature and prevents overheating.
The engine cooling system also provides a means of heating the passenger compartment and cooling the engine oil. The cooling system is pressurized and uses an engine driven centrifugal water pump to circulate coolant throughout the system. A separate and remotely mounted, pressurized coolant bottle is used. An engine mounted thermostat controls coolant flow through the engine.
  • When the engine is cold the thermostat is closed. The engine cooling system has no flow through the radiator or engine oil cooler. The engine driven water pump circulates coolant through the engine, passenger compartment heater core and high voltage battery heat exchanger, if required.
  • When the engine is warm the thermostat is full open. Coolant flows through the engine, radiator, engine oil cooler, passenger compartment heater core, and high voltage battery heat exchanger, if required.
The engine cooling system consists of:

  • Radiator
  • Electric cooling fan
  • Thermostat
  • Engine driven water pump
  • Engine oil cooler
  • A pressurized coolant de-aeration bottle
  • Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor
  • Cooling system pressure cap
  • Coolant
 

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Coolant Capacity:

View attachment 50770

That's a helluva a lot of coolant.
I'm surprised that the engine loop has to much coolant. But also surprised how little the battery and power electronics loops have. I would guess the pumps on the battery and power electronics loops have to move quite a bit of coolant when things start to get hot outside.
 

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As I suspected and is common with other EVs. To properly do a coolant change you need a scan tool so you can run the Aux Coolant Pump and open and close the valves in the system in addition to a vacuum setup to pull any air out. DIY it at your own risk. There's a good reason these vehicles have 10-year coolant in them. Changing it is a real pain and something only a shop can do correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
As I suspected and is common with other EVs. To properly do a coolant change you need a scan tool so you can run the Aux Coolant Pump and open and close the valves in the system in addition to a vacuum setup to pull any air out. DIY it at your own risk. There's a good reason these vehicles have 10-year coolant in them. Changing it is a real pain and something only a shop can do correctly.
Would a Foxwell scanner be capable of that? https://www.foxwelltech.com/product/item-169.html
 
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