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Discussion Starter #1
hello all,
The manual says "Low" should be used only in the following condition "This range should be used when descending very steep
grades". However, I am seeing from other Hybrid reviews that some drivers prefer L to D due to higher regenerative brakes.
The question is that is it safe to drive in "L" mode all the time? what if the ICE kicks in while in "Low" driving mode? Is it safe for both electric and ICE?

Thanks,
 

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The big problem I see is that while the L mode has higher regenerative breaking, the person behind you might not know that. When you let off the gas, I don't think the break light kicks on, so it is likely a safety issue since the vehicle slows down quite a bit when you release the gas.

Edit: Driving in L mode is the same as D but you slightly apply the brakes when you release the gas. If the brake lights do not come with L for the slowing you are at risk of getting rear ended if you and others around you are not careful.
 

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I have been driving in L exclusively for around a week now, and I am getting used to it. At first, you really have to try and modulate the gas pedal to ensure that you don't have jerky stops and starts. But within a day or so, the van is driving much smoother.

I agree with xema in that if someone is following you too closely and you let up on the gas, they may be in for a bit of surprise. But in stop and go traffic, this doesn't really present itself as much of a problem since we are all just crawling along and the regenerative braking is negligible. However, if driving on a highway and you let up on the gas, you can reduce your speed pretty drastically, and without the aid of brake lights other drivers may not respond in a kind manner.

I can't speak to how it is affecting my mileage at this point since I have a mix of D and L driving on this tank of gas, though the past few days I am seeing around 57km (35.6 miles) electric range in a variety of speeds driving on the highway (from stop and go to 105km/h).
 

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How does ACC feel in L? I love using ACC on my Outback in traffic and on the highway. I could see using L every time ACC is in use.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The big problem I see is that while the L mode has higher regenerative breaking, the person behind you might not know that. When you let off the gas, I don't think the break light kicks on, so it is likely a safety issue since the vehicle slows down quite a bit when you release the gas.

Edit: Driving in L mode is the same as D but you slightly apply the brakes when you release the gas. If the brake lights do not come with L for the slowing you are at risk of getting rear ended if you and others around you are not careful.
That is a very interesting point indeed. Thanks for pointing that out.

I also agree once you get used to it, it will become much less abrupt.

The concern that I have here is mainly regarding transmission/engine; in a fully ICE engine, L means that you running the engine at a higher RPM by lowering the gear ratio. That means that it is not wise to get into high speed since it results in even higher RPM with no benefit, hence putting much more burden on the engine/transmission but with higher torque.

The question here is whether L mode in this car is the same concept as an ICE engine, OR it ONLY means aggressive regenerative brakes with NO impact on the gear ratio or ICE RPM?

Thanks
 

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How does ACC feel in L? I love using ACC on my Outback in traffic and on the highway. I could see using L every time ACC is in use.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
It's pretty smooth, actually. I think it might accelerate more quickly than I typically would but I really like the feature!
 

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The concern that I have here is mainly regarding transmission/engine; in a fully ICE engine, L means that you running the engine at a higher RPM by lowering the gear ratio. That means that it is not wise to get into high speed since it results in even higher RPM with no benefit, hence putting much more burden on the engine/transmission but with higher torque.

The question here is whether L mode in this car is the same concept as an ICE engine, OR it ONLY means aggressive regenerative brakes with NO impact on the gear ratio or ICE RPM?Thanks
I'm certainly no expert in transmissions, but with the hybrid's unique planetary gear set up, I don't think you can think about it like the usual ZF 9 speed set up. Unfortunately, we don't have a tachometer to see what RPM the engine is running at, but it certainly doesn't sound nor feel like the engine is running at higher RPMs than what a typical ICE engine would when driving 100km/h+ (60mph+).

I will leave it to the experts on this board to explain how the hybrid drive train works in regards to your question since I am really out of my element in even attempting to answer your question! :)
 
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That is a very interesting point indeed. Thanks for pointing that out.

I also agree once you get used to it, it will become much less abrupt.

The concern that I have here is mainly regarding transmission/engine; in a fully ICE engine, L means that you running the engine at a higher RPM by lowering the gear ratio. That means that it is not wise to get into high speed since it results in even higher RPM with no benefit, hence putting much more burden on the engine/transmission but with higher torque.

The question here is whether L mode in this car is the same concept as an ICE engine, OR it ONLY means aggressive regenerative brakes with NO impact on the gear ratio or ICE RPM?

Thanks
I would like to hear what someone from Chrysler has to say about this. Unless Chrysler says it is OK to drive in L on the highway, I am reluctant to try it in case of damage to some part of the engine.
 

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I drove 36 miles yesterday in "L" mode, coming from my experience with my Prius and Leaf, that it simply increased regeneration. About 20 miles of that trip was highway at speeds up to 75. I can confirm that the van handled really well, however that speed management was more difficult since "coasting" no-longer happened when you let off the gas.

I also drop the same route in ACC mode (but in D, not L), and was so excited to see it handle stop lights, lane changes, and getting cut-off, more seamlessly than I could have handled the same situations. I'll try ACC in L today on my trip home.
 

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How does ACC feel in L? I love using ACC on my Outback in traffic and on the highway. I could see using L every time ACC is in use.
EDIT--Removed paragraph where I thought ACC stood for ACCessory mode.--

The difference between L and D mode is actually in software, there is no physical change to the transmission. You can flip between modes with your foot on the "gas" pedal or in cruise control and see no change.

L has higher regenerative braking and D does not. So, it accelerates exactly the same, the only difference is the software turns on regenerative braking in L mode when the "gas" pedal is not depressed.
 

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ACC mode on the Pacifica is ACCessory mode, which means that the radio and climate are on, but the vehicle does not move. So, I do not understand what you are talking about putting the vehicle in ACC mode while driving.

The difference between L and D mode is actually in software, there is no physical change to the transmission. You can flip between modes with your foot on the "gas" pedal or in cruise control and see no change.

L has higher regenerative braking and D does not. So, it accelerates exactly the same, the only difference is the software turns on regenerative braking in L mode when the "gas" pedal is not depressed.
ACC is "Adaptive Cruise Control"
 

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The big problem I see is that while the L mode has higher regenerative breaking, the person behind you might not know that. When you let off the gas, I don't think the break light kicks on, so it is likely a safety issue since the vehicle slows down quite a bit when you release the gas.

Edit: Driving in L mode is the same as D but you slightly apply the brakes when you release the gas. If the brake lights do not come with L for the slowing you are at risk of getting rear ended if you and others around you are not careful.

I had a similar issue with my 40 foot motorhome. When you took your foot off the accelerator and very briefly tapped the brake going down hill the computers in the engine and transmission too over and kept me going the same speed down long mountainous hills at the speed when brake was last applied. The computers used a combination of engine braking and transmission downshifting to maintain the speed when I last let my foot off the brakes. There were no further brake lights applied. I was always worried that someone one would run into the back with no brake lights but nothing ever came close in about 60,000 miles and 3 trips to Alaska.
 

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The big problem I see is that while the L mode has higher regenerative breaking, the person behind you might not know that. When you let off the gas, I don't think the break light kicks on, so it is likely a safety issue since the vehicle slows down quite a bit when you release the gas.

Edit: Driving in L mode is the same as D but you slightly apply the brakes when you release the gas. If the brake lights do not come with L for the slowing you are at risk of getting rear ended if you and others around you are not careful.
you are thinking of regenerative coasting... which is a thing but I don't think the Pacifica Hybrid has it. Regenerative braking only works when the brakes are applied.

In the GAS version of the Pacifica, L brings the revs up higher, which eliminates the torque or puts the revs at peak torque (one or the other) making it ideal for driving in snow (less tire spin) and descents using the engine and tranny for braking.

I would only use L in icy snowy conditions. Brakes are easier to replace than a transmission.
 
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