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I conclude that in addition to regen breake, the L mode reduces the kwh battery outflow "for the same foot pressure" which can be easily compensated by either cruise control or applying more pressure on the gas pedal. In any case when driving in L mode after a few min, that delivery does not matter anymore cause you are already in the steady state speed wise.
Actually, I noticed this, too, when I first started driving my PacHy tonight after unplugging it from a full charge. We were driving over to our friends' house for the evening. The first few times that I switched from D to L and back to D, I noticed that the kW power output to the wheels was actually lower in L mode than in D mode. So, for the same amount of foot pressure on the pedal, L mode was using less power. This is comparable to the Eco mode in my i-MiEV (the Meepster), which is meant to be an energy saving feature for drivers with a lead foot. It takes greater pressure on the "go pedal" to go the same speed.

The only reason I did not mention this in my last post was because I was not yet sure what was causing this difference between D and L. Also, later when I was doing extensive testing switching between the two drive modes, I was using cruise control, and I was no longer able to discern any difference between them. So, I thought maybe the difference I was noticing earlier had something to do with driving in L mode on a fully charged battery. I figured I needed to do more testing to figure out what was really causing that initial difference before I posted my results and conclusions about it.

However, your explanation sounds like the most plausible. That it is a difference in the amount of foot pressure required to output the same amount of power. So, basically like the Eco mode in my Meepster. This actually makes me very happy if it is, in fact, the case. As this is the exact driving profile I have always wished I could have in my Meepster, i.e. 50% acceleration profile and very strong regen braking.

I will do more testing tomorrow between the D and L modes, but only using foot pressure on the accelerator, not using cruise control. I want to verify your conclusions. Thank you!
 
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So "technically" there is a difference in "revs" from D to L. I was posting incorrectly as the watts go down from D to L, not up.

Makes sense, more regen so you have to press the pedal harder for more power.
 

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I don't think that there is a difference in revs between D and L for any given speed as you would find in a typical auto switching from D to 3/2/L or whatever. At least I haven't noticed differences in kwh output for any given speed.
HOWEVER
I agree with you that it seems to be related to pedal pressure. I have to press harder in L to get the same speed in D. The kwh output seems the same regardless of L or D, for any speed though. Taking my foot off the pedal results in much more aggressive regen braking in L vs D.

Is this consistent with everybody else?
 

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Okay. So here's what I've found in my testing over the weekend. There is a difference between D and L in power consumed when maintaining the same pressure on the accelerator.

Multiple times this weekend, I was driving down a long, flat straightaway in L mode (not using cruise control). I used the "Power Flow" hybrid screen on the Nav screen to monitor the power usage. I was able to maintain the speed consistently at 45 mph. In L mode, maintaining 45 mph took 10 kW of power output. Keeping my foot in the exact same position, I turned the gear to D mode. The power flow immediately jumped from 10 kW to 30 kW, and my PacHy started accelerating. It got all the way up to almost 60 mph before I backed off the pedal. I did not want to get a speeding ticket. So, I was unable to see the highest speed D mode would have accelerated me to. However, I was able to do this same experiment multiple times throughout the weekend.

There is definitely a difference between D and L with regards to the acceleration profile. D mode accelerates faster, whereas L mode cuts the acceleration ramp and gives you more play with the go pedal. That's a good thing for the more lead-footed among us!
 
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I am not an engineer, so take that into consideration. Today I did something stupid, executing a change of gear without looking at the forums or the manual, from D to L while driving at steady state at about 30 mph. The van did not go into 'self destruct mode' as I feared it might. There was a noticeable slowing of the car, which lines up with what you guys saw, but no AUDIBLE change in the drivetrain, which leads me to believe that there is absolutely nothing mechanical changing, only the way the computer maps the throttle output from the pedal, to the power inverter that controls current flow to the drive motors.

Very slick and I love the whole thing, though I doubt my wife will ever feel comfortable with that.

On another note, another poster stated that you would need to watch out for cars behind you not paying attention to your regen braking, and this is something I think that Chrysler should be able to easily patch. In L mode the car should be showing brake lights on when regen braking goes about a certain threshold much like in a normal car. I spent most of my early adulthood driving manual transmission cars and this scenario is no different to downshifting, which I used to do all the time. There would be no brake lights when down shifting, so you had to check your rear view mirror when you do.
 

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On another note, another poster stated that you would need to watch out for cars behind you not paying attention to your regen braking, and this is something I think that Chrysler should be able to easily patch. In L mode the car should be showing brake lights on when regen braking goes about a certain threshold much like in a normal car. I spent most of my early adulthood driving manual transmission cars and this scenario is no different to downshifting, which I used to do all the time. There would be no brake lights when down shifting, so you had to check your rear view mirror when you do.


Very true! I always make sure to be aware of traffic around and behind me when performing any hypermiling techniques.
 

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I am not an engineer, so take that into consideration. Today I did something stupid, executing a change of gear without looking at the forums or the manual, from D to L while driving at steady state at about 30 mph. The van did not go into 'self destruct mode' as I feared it might. There was a noticeable slowing of the car, which lines up with what you guys saw, but no AUDIBLE change in the drivetrain, which leads me to believe that there is absolutely nothing mechanical changing, only the way the computer maps the throttle output from the pedal, to the power inverter that controls current flow to the drive motors.
Have you tried shifting from D/L to Reverse while moving forward? :grin2:

On another note, another poster stated that you would need to watch out for cars behind you not paying attention to your regen braking, and this is something I think that Chrysler should be able to easily patch. In L mode the car should be showing brake lights on when regen braking goes about a certain threshold much like in a normal car. I spent most of my early adulthood driving manual transmission cars and this scenario is no different to downshifting, which I used to do all the time. There would be no brake lights when down shifting, so you had to check your rear view mirror when you do.
A Chevy Volt owner actually got a ticket for this. He had to go to court to explain that, no his brake lights weren't malfunctioning, but were actually operating as designed. Story was the judge through the ticket out and asked to see his Volt personally!

I wouldn't expect Chrysler to change the operation here.
 

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Have you tried shifting from D/L to Reverse while moving forward? :grin2: .

I actually do this all the time in my Meepster! All that happens is the i-MiEV slows down and then goes in the opposite direction. No grinding gears or anything. Of course, I never do it from a high speed. Just when I'm backing out of my driveway.

OTOH, I would NEVER try this in my PacHy since it has an actual transmission!
 
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I actually do this all the time in my Meepster! All that happens is the i-MiEV slows down and then goes in the opposite direction. No grinding gears or anything. Of course, I never do it from a high speed. Just when I'm backing out of my driveway.

OTOH, I would NEVER try this in my PacHy since it has an actual transmission!
What is the difference between the PacHy transmission and the Chevy Volt transmission?
 

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What is the difference between the PacHy transmission and the Chevy Volt transmission?
I do not know the difference between the PacHy transmission and the Chevy Volt transmission. My other vehicle is a Mitsubishi i-MiEV, which is an all-electric BEV. We have nicknamed it the "Meepster"! The i-MiEV's transmission really isn't a transmission. It is an electronic "gear box" that merely sends software signals to the electric motors controlling the wheels. So, if I am moving backwards in Reverse and suddenly shift into Drive, all that happens is the eTransmission sends a signal to reverse the electric motors' polarity. When I drop-shift from Reverse to Drive (only when moving at slow speeds), the Meepster slows down, comes to a momentary pause, and then resumes driving in the opposite direction.
 

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I do not know the difference between the PacHy transmission and the Chevy Volt transmission. My other vehicle is a Mitsubishi i-MiEV, which is an all-electric BEV. We have nicknamed it the "Meepster"! The i-MiEV's transmission really isn't a transmission. It is an electronic "gear box" that merely sends software signals to the electric motors controlling the wheels. So, if I am moving backwards in Reverse and suddenly shift into Drive, all that happens is the eTransmission sends a signal to reverse the electric motors' polarity. When I drop-shift from Reverse to Drive (only when moving at slow speeds), the Meepster slows down, comes to a momentary pause, and then resumes driving in the opposite direction.
Yeah, I was hoping you would also be familiar with the Volt's design. I'm pretty sure it's capable of the same thing: shifting into R while moving forward, with same effect as the i-MiEV.
 

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Yeah, I was hoping you would also be familiar with the Volt's design. I'm pretty sure it's capable of the same thing: shifting into R while moving forward, with same effect as the i-MiEV.
Unfortunately, I am not familiar enough with the Volt to say if that is the case. Given the fact the Volt has an ICE engine that can, at times, be used to provide motive power to the wheels, I would be hesitant to try this "trick".
 

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Unfortunately, I am not familiar enough with the Volt to say if that is the case. Given the fact the Volt has an ICE engine that can, at times, be used to provide motive power to the wheels, I would be hesitant to try this "trick".
Yeah, I've not had the guts to try it, but since the ICE is not tied to the wheels (it charges a battery which then powers the wheels), I think it would be fine. The guys on the Volt forum seem to think so, anyway. :wink2:
 

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Man, I must be gutsy then. Given my 2006 Prius' CVT, I've always tossed it directly into reverse from drive, or vice versa. It won't allow you to if you're above the energy MG2 can handle (about 8MPH), and I probably have some of the technicals wrong, but I know it works flawlessly and I've done it since I've owned it with no detrimental effects.

When I got my Pacifica Hybrid, I didn't even really think about that "workflow", I knew it was a PHEV and that the gasoline engine was attached to the planetary gear, so since day #1 I've done the same thing as I've always done in the Prius. I only use "P" to actually park, I slip between D, N, and L depending on my driving conditions, and when backing out of my driveway I move between R and D (or when doing a multi-point parking job) without stopping first. I hadn't really even thought that -that- wouldn't be a thing on the Pacifica.

Since the first 28 or so miles are all EV anyway, those miles -really- shouldn't care how you change modes since it's all software and power transmission changes. I can try it at speed, but I'd imagine the Pacifica should lock out "R" when you're at a speed where the electric motor couldn't put that energy back (about 30 kWh, not sure what speed that'd represent, but given the harsh g-forces involved, probably the same as the Prius or lower).

Long story short, yes you can safely transition from R to D and back without stopping, this isn't your Dad's Grand Voyager LE here.
:)
 

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I couldn't find a thread for this and instead of starting a new one, I figure this one is close enough:

Why didn't Chrysler include a driving mode for the Hybrid?

It doesn't have to be pure electric or gas but just something like 'Eco' that favors battery over gas and 'Power' or 'Highway' that favors gas.

I ask because if I go on a longer drive (not a road trip, just like half an hour to an hour on the freeway), I want to preserve the battery for when I get to my destination and do electric stop&go driving.

I test drove a BMW X5 plug-in hybrid and it had this type of setting, and I've seen it on others, even gas only cars, why not on the Pacifica?
 

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Their rational was something along the lines of "Parents don't want to be bothered with this level of detail because they are busy with their kids."

I kind of agree with this for most (minivan) drivers, but probably not for drivers drawn to a PHEV minivan. Also, if they really believed this then why replace the speedometer with a gas gauge, provide a "driving coach", and a bunch of hybrid specific displays. Seems like they should have made the dash look exactly like the gas model, and just hide all the inner workings of the hybrid except for the charge level.
 

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Seems like they should have made the dash look exactly like the gas model, and just hide all the inner workings of the hybrid except for the charge level.
That's exactly what Mitsubishi did with their i-MiEV all-electric EV (my "Meepster"). The dash looks almost exactly the same as the gas version. You'd think that simpler would be better, but not having access to any of that wonderful EV driving information is frustrating, at least for me.
 

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I didn't get time to read the whole thread, but I thought it's worth mentioning...

In D mode with the battery at 100% it appears regenerative braking is lessened, while in L it is not or much less so. Does anyone know if Chrysler is actually charging the battery pack to 100% SOC? It seems to me they could be since the charging it from 98 to 100% SOC on a L2 charger takes 20 minutes!

Anyways for now I'm trying to avoid driving in L when I leave the house with the batteries at 100%. I want the battery pack to last as long as possible...
 

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I didn't get time to read the whole thread, but I thought it's worth mentioning...

In D mode with the battery at 100% it appears regenerative braking is lessened, while in L it is not or much less so. Does anyone know if Chrysler is actually charging the battery pack to 100% SOC? It seems to me they could be since the charging it from 98 to 100% SOC on a L2 charger takes 20 minutes!

Anyways for now I'm trying to avoid driving in L when I leave the house with the batteries at 100%. I want the battery pack to last as long as possible...
Regenerative braking will always be lessened (in any driving mode) immediately following a full charge. The EV would not have anywhere to store the regenerated power. After driving for a little bit and using up some of the battery capacity, the regen braking will kick back in once there is room to store the energy produced.
 
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