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We recently drove from Illinois to Maine and before we left, a friend sent me a picture of charging stations at the Ohio Turnpike service plazas. Without really thinking about it, I pulled up to the first station only to find that the plug wasn't compatible. Same went for the second station although the plug was different from the first.
Then it dawned on me that the stations were for fast charging cars like a Tesla or in the case of what I saw at the second plaza, a Kia Niro and what I believe was a Jaguar I-Pace and I was out of luck.
This all got me to thinking that our Pacificas would be even more of an attractive proposition if they could accept a fast charge when on long trips. I'm the first to admit that I don't know what it takes to equip a vehicle with a fast charging battery or what differs in the design of the battery.
Our van still got nearly 34 mpg so we were very pleased with it as was our cat who got the entire second row to herself.
 

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The fast charging uses high voltage DC and is very different than level 1 and level 2 charges which are compatible with household power. The pure EVs have much larger batteries and would take 3-5x longer to charge than a Pachy. We get the best of both worlds enough battery power for local trips and no stopping for charging on long trips. We do get good, 34 mpg on long trips.

I usually get 1,000 to 2,000 miles between fill ups. I have solar panels on the house so I don't pay for any electricity! When you work the numbers I get 2-3c/mile!
 

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This all got me to thinking that our Pacificas would be even more of an attractive proposition if they could accept a fast charge when on long trips.
I guess you didn't look up how much it costs to fast charge. Plus you would have to recharge every 30 miles or so for at least 15 minutes each time. (If our car had DC charging)

Nah, I'll just gas it up in less than 5 minutes and go another 400 miles before filling up again. That's the beauty of a PHEV.
 

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The Outlander PHEV is the only PHEV with DC charging with an even smaller battery. I agree that it was a smart idea to exclude the DC option to save on manufacturing cost. I have an eGolf and only DC charge 2-5 times a year with it. Many DC stations charge a flat fee of $5-10 a session.

Now, a 40A onboard AC charger, I could get behind that. At 9.6kW the battery would be recharged in around 90 minutes.
 

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I just did a 2200 mile roadtrip to Seattle. Half of the places I stopped at to charge only had DC fast chargers, so I didn't have any option. I wish it was there in the van at least, but I guess it adds a cost to the van that may not actually be very useful in the long run. Wish it was an option so I could have added it though.
 

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I just did a 2200 mile roadtrip to Seattle. Half of the places I stopped at to charge only had DC fast chargers, so I didn't have any option. I wish it was there in the van at least, but I guess it adds a cost to the van that may not actually be very useful in the long run. Wish it was an option so I could have added it though.
To get an idea of what it might cost to add DC charging capability, the Chevy Bolt EV is the only one of the current crop of entry-level BEVs that does not come standard with DC charging. The option price to add it is $750.

While it might seem a bit odd, consider that the Bolt, much more than any of the others (Nissan Leaf, Tesla Model 3, Hyundai Kona EV, Kia Niro EV), would be the BEV choice for fleets. So, the rationale of making DC charging optional on the Bolt might be that the DC quick-charge capability wouldn't be needed in those fleet applications. I've seen a few fleet Bolts. The others? None.

Not to mention that Teslas use a proprietary plug which would require an adapter to use one of their Superchargers. Even then, I doubt it would work since you'd have to have some sort of account with Tesla to pay for it.

Regardless, I have to admit that if DC quick charging were available for the PacHy at an additional $750, I probably would have liked to have had it.
 

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Never tried any DC charging station so far. Good to know they dont work on PacHy.
 

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I wish it was there in the van at least, but I guess it adds a cost to the van that may not actually be very useful in the long run. Wish it was an option so I could have added it though.
Regardless, I have to admit that if DC quick charging were available for the PacHy at an additional $750, I probably would have liked to have had it.
Why do you guys want DC charging? Can you charge for free? If not, DC charging is costlier and slower than buying gas. That's why it doesn't make sense to have DC charging in a PHEV.

For example in FL with EVgo, it costs $0.35/min to charge. I estimate it would take at least 15 minutes to DC charge a PacHy if possible. So it would cost $5.25 to get 30 miles of range. With Electrify America, it would cost $4.75. Cheaper and faster to just buy gas, especially on a trip.

What are your thoughts?
 

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Why do you guys want DC charging? Can you charge for free? If not, DC charging is costlier and slower than buying gas. That's why it doesn't make sense to have DC charging in a PHEV.

For example in FL with EVgo, it costs $0.35/min to charge. I estimate it would take at least 15 minutes to DC charge a PacHy if possible. So it would cost $5.25 to get 30 miles of range. With Electrify America, it would cost $4.75. Cheaper and faster to just buy gas, especially on a trip.

What are your thoughts?
Well, there are a few places that I think you can DCFC for free, with the main ones being Nissan dealers.

With that said, I have to agree that, otherwise, paying for DCFC on a PHEV is a non-starter. Those EVgo and EA chargers are definitely pricey. I guess I was still thinking in J1772 free charge mode. Even those can be tough to find in some parts of the country. I once read somewhere that in EV-crazy southern CA, something like less than 9% of the available chargers are gratis.
 

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Fast charging seems attractive for the small battery in the Pacifica, but it's probably not common or practical enough that they'll ever add it, at least while the battery is so small.

For fun, I did some back of the napkin math, though. The battery in the Pacifica is 16kWh, and ours takes about 14kWh to charge from empty, so I'll use 14kWh. Tesla v2 Superchargers can charge a compatible Tesla at up to 150Kw (for reference, the charger built into the Pacifica maxes out at 6.6kW).

Assuming they were compatible, and you could get optimal charging speeds (you can't - they change depending on battery temperature and state of charge), theoretically you could fill the Pacifica's battery from zero at 150kW in just over five minutes. Even at the 50kW you can get from a CHAdeMO DC fast charger, it would only take about 17 minutes. Again, these are fantasy numbers, and it would be slower in real life, but it's fun to daydream of charging that fast... :)
 

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VW, Audi and Porsche have already moved to 800v charging.

7.2kW charge rates from the current 240v/30A EVSE’s are bound to be phased out as battery sizes grow.

But on the bright side, i see test sites utilizing parking lot lamp posts to power 3.6kW and some even 7.2kW evses using the lighting grid. When upgraded to LED, apparently this gird is mostly surplus and well suited for repurposing in the short term.

So every parking lot could be retrofitted.. problem is using a pay per use model for profit kills the entire benefit.

Same happens for fast charging.. Everyone wants the speed but most don’t want to pay for it. Its already hard for people to step up to a $300-$1,000 Level-2 unit because they have a 1.2kW Level-1 for free already. The DCFC are $5,000-10,000 and clearly aren't affordable for home use to the majority and carry a premium to use in the wild.

Kind of kills the benefits.. Besides most people park for 8hrs a night anyway so we have the time needed for cheaper solutions.
 

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I talk to a lot of drivers at the Volta station. And I noticed most of them say they get around 25 to 30 miles per hour charging at level 2. It makes me wonder why PacHy takes 2 hours for 30 miles.
 

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This is because those cars weigh 60% as much as the pacifica and can go further on a kWh.

I have never adopted the "miles per hour" mindset. Know how many miles per kWh your car can get (typically 3 m/kWh for the Pacifica but this changes based on how fast you drive, elevation gain/loss, ambient temp and need for HVA, etc.) and how fast youre adding to the battery. Volta stations typically supply 30A, some can do 40A but the Pacifica can only accept 27.5A. With the commercial power Volta uses, you are typically pulling 5.8kW. So roughly every 10 minutes you add one kWH which will move the Pacifica 3 miles.

Smaller/more efficent cars that can get 5 m/kWh are who's probably telling you they get 25-30 miles an hour.
 

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:unsure:
 
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