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2022 Chrysler Pacifica Limited S, Black
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1-month old Limited with just over 1K miles on it.

The Mopar/Chrysler App says "next maintenance" is at 10,000 but I was told by the dealership when I had my previous Pacifica that it should be every 5K miles.

Should I bring it in (for the first time) at 5K or 10K miles?

How about after the first check-up, should it be every 5K miles or 10K miles?
 

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The dealership has a vested interest in you visiting as often as they can get you in there. 10K is fine.
With that said, oil changes is literally like a religion. Some people want to do it at 3k and think everyone else is crazy for waiting for more miles. While others are perfectly happy at 10k. So at the end of the day, you probably want to pick what you are comfortable with. One factor is time though... if you don't do a lot of miles, it's probably best to get it changed out annually.

For what it's worth, I think modern synthetics can go much longer than 5,000 miles and I will be following the maintenance indicator in the vehicle.
 
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I second shingles reply, it is perfectly okay to follow the manufacturer's service intervals. Doing it earlier won't hurt anything except your wallet. You will likely never see a difference in engine life by changing earlier than recommended.
 

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Your 2022 owners manual states that oil changes should never exceed 10,000 miles or 16,000 km. I have noted other sources stating that prior year Pacificas should have the oil changed at 7,500 miles. My dealership wanted me to have my oil changed at 5,000 miles. Of course the dealerships have a vested interest in how often you change the oil (aka, the more the merrier for them).
Most importantly though, always use a quality full synthetic as recommended by your owners manual.
 

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I've looked at the owner's manual for my '22 and I didn't see the 10K mi limit that @ludtrichard mentions, but the Mercedes E350 I had only required annual services or 12K mi, which ever came first. It held 9 qts of oil, and had no dip stick, so I had to depend on the dash "idiot" lights and the service message that service was due.

I'm disappointed that there's no real attempt to specify a time/mileage max for oil changes, but having the vehicle's electronics monitor engine running time to determine oil life and tell you when oil changes is a nice feature, I'll admit. Sort of makes it harder to plan for maintenance, but I guess you can always check the vehicle info on the dash to see the current oil life. I'm at 90% w/ 840 mi, so I'm going to assume that 7500 mi is about the correct interval. I'm an older driver who learned about changing the oil from my father and he had me crawling under his car's to remove the drain plug and filter by the time I was 13 in the late '70's and we did it every 3K miles religiously.

@CANADAHYBRIDGUY 's comment about not inflating the tires above 38PSI struck me as funny because my E350 had manufacturer recommended pressure of 35/39 PSI for the front & rear and the GLx SUV's were 41/45 PSI. I picked up my Pacifica from the dealer w/ 20 mi on it and it had Nitrogen filled tires and the vehicle info said all the tires were about 45PSI, which pretty well matched up w/ the Mercedes SUV I had for a couple of years and I didn't think anything of it until I saw that comment. When I looked at the sidewall on the tires, it says max PSI is 40. The door sticker says 36/36 PSI, so the dealer over inflated my tires severely. I'm almost certain that just having Nitrogen does not mean you need to over inflate to compensate with regards to regular air.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Your 2022 owners manual states that oil changes should never exceed 10,000 miles or 16,000 km. I have noted other sources stating that prior year Pacificas should have the oil changed at 7,500 miles. My dealership wanted me to have my oil changed at 5,000 miles. Of course the dealerships have a vested interest in how often you change the oil (aka, the more the merrier for them).
Most importantly though, always use a quality full synthetic as recommended by your owners manual.
I think the dealership said it’s also because of where I live, that tires should be rotated more often etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've looked at the owner's manual for my '22 and I didn't see the 10K mi limit that @ludtrichard mentions, but the Mercedes E350 I had only required annual services or 12K mi, which ever came first. It held 9 qts of oil, and had no dip stick, so I had to depend on the dash "idiot" lights and the service message that service was due.

I'm disappointed that there's no real attempt to specify a time/mileage max for oil changes, but having the vehicle's electronics monitor engine running time to determine oil life and tell you when oil changes is a nice feature, I'll admit. Sort of makes it harder to plan for maintenance, but I guess you can always check the vehicle info on the dash to see the current oil life. I'm at 90% w/ 840 mi, so I'm going to assume that 7500 mi is about the correct interval. I'm an older driver who learned about changing the oil from my father and he had me crawling under his car's to remove the drain plug and filter by the time I was 13 in the late '70's and we did it every 3K miles religiously.

@CANADAHYBRIDGUY 's comment about not inflating the tires above 38PSI struck me as funny because my E350 had manufacturer recommended pressure of 35/39 PSI for the front & rear and the GLx SUV's were 41/45 PSI. I picked up my Pacifica from the dealer w/ 20 mi on it and it had Nitrous filled tires and the vehicle info said all the tires were about 45PSI, which pretty well matched up w/ the Mercedes SUV I had for a couple of years and I didn't think anything of it until I saw that comment. When I looked at the sidewall on the tires, it says max PSI is 40. The door sticker says 36/36 PSI, so the dealer over inflated my tires severely. I'm almost certain that just having Nitrous does not mean you need to over inflate to compensate with regards to regular air.
If you base it on oil life, what % before you change oil?
 

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I think the dealership said it’s also because of where I live, that tires should be rotated more often etc.
That's complete and utter BS. Tire rotation is based on mileage and wear, not time. IF you live in an urban area where you have to drive across town to get to places, or in rural areas where you drive into town a lot, then you may rack up more miles that people who only drive to & from the neighborhood school/grocery store.
 

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If you base it on oil life, what % before you change oil?
That's a great question that I don't know the answer to yet. I'm going to have to see what percentage it's at by the time I get to 7500 mi. I'm thinking between 5-20%. More than 25% is wasting your money and getting down to 0%, how do you tell how far past due your oil change you are unless it goes negative, which I don't want to test to find out.
 

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I've looked at the owner's manual for my '22 and I didn't see the 10K mi limit that @ludtrichard mentions, but the Mercedes E350 I had only required annual services or 12K mi, which ever came first. It held 9 qts of oil, and had no dip stick, so I had to depend on the dash "idiot" lights and the service message that service was due.

I'm disappointed that there's no real attempt to specify a time/mileage max for oil changes, but having the vehicle's electronics monitor engine running time to determine oil life and tell you when oil changes is a nice feature, I'll admit. Sort of makes it harder to plan for maintenance, but I guess you can always check the vehicle info on the dash to see the current oil life. I'm at 90% w/ 840 mi, so I'm going to assume that 7500 mi is about the correct interval. I'm an older driver who learned about changing the oil from my father and he had me crawling under his car's to remove the drain plug and filter by the time I was 13 in the late '70's and we did it every 3K miles religiously.

@CANADAHYBRIDGUY 's comment about not inflating the tires above 38PSI struck me as funny because my E350 had manufacturer recommended pressure of 35/39 PSI for the front & rear and the GLx SUV's were 41/45 PSI. I picked up my Pacifica from the dealer w/ 20 mi on it and it had Nitrous filled tires and the vehicle info said all the tires were about 45PSI, which pretty well matched up w/ the Mercedes SUV I had for a couple of years and I didn't think anything of it until I saw that comment. When I looked at the sidewall on the tires, it says max PSI is 40. The door sticker says 36/36 PSI, so the dealer over inflated my tires severely. I'm almost certain that just having Nitrous does not mean you need to over inflate to compensate with regards to regular air.
Welcome to the forum.
10,000 miles or 12 months for synthetic oil. The oil life gauge seems to correlate pretty well on my gas van. At 5,000 miles since oil change the gauge says about 50%. I tend to get the oil changed around 5,000 miles but could wait until later. For other vehicles that use synthetic oil we've gone 6000 or 7500 miles. I guess I've gotten used to taking the van in more often to let them work on it.

There are several oil changing threads on the forum if you are interested in that. Seems like I read that the van took 5-6 quarts of oil. I thought it was interesting that some people used an extractor to remove the oil.

Some vans came with a smaller User's guide. Were you given an extensive (600+ pages) owner's manual with your van? If not, you can download one from the Mopar website.

Regarding tires being overinflated from the dealer, some forum members have mentioned that it is related to storage and cars possibly sitting on the lot. Dealers are supposed to adjust the pressure when vans are sold, but it seems like many don't.
 

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Thanks @SciTchr.

My owner's manual is close to an inch thick, but I didn't bother to read it. I downloaded an electronic copy from mopar.com and searched for the things I was interested in rather than reading it front-to-back. I did find the info on page 301 as @ludtrichard mentioned. Guess I overlooked it.

At this point in my life, I don't need to save a few bucks by doing my own oil changes, so it doesn't really matter how many quarts it takes. I'll let the stealership handle it while it's under warranty and then find a reputable shop after that. Using an extractor is a bit of an overkill in my opinion. I recall some places doing that to change the rear differential fluid, but not motor oil.

My main worry is that some young tech doesn't over tighten or cross thread the drain plug. Does Chrysler use metal drain plugs or have they gone to the plastic type that you have to replace with every oil change like some other car manufacturers have? I heard Mercedes, BMW, and even Ford had gone to plastic drain plugs to be able to charge you an extra $5 per oil change. I haven't had a chance to get under my van yet.

I don't think the over inflated tires has anything to do with storage, at least not on the lot. The car arrived on the lot mid week and I contacted the dealership on Sat, had them hold it and I bought it on Mon. It's possible it was over inflated at the plant before it was loaded on the truck to be delivered to the dealership and they just didn't "prep" the car. The door tag says the vehicle was manufactured 3/22 and I bought it on 4/11/22. It still had the plastic protectors on the Uconnect screen, the Amazon FireTVs, etc., the mats were still in plastic bags, the vac hose wasn't installed. There's still white markings on the windows near the corners that I haven't cleaned off and I have no idea why they were there. Hopefully it was just an oversight and I can let 10 PSI out. With my previous (used) Mercedes vehicles, you had to "set" the TPMS system for the pressure that was your "normal" pressure and once it got to 10 PSI below the set point, the idiot light would go off on the dash. If you were one of those people who drove over 100 MPH a lot, and added 4 PSI, you'd want to set the default at that higher limit so that you weren't 15 PSI low before the indicator went off. I don't know if I need to reset the TPMS, or if it only alerts if one or more tires is off compared to the rest, or if it's a differential from some set point.

I haven't had a Chrysler since 2017, and that was an 2005 Town & Country Signature Series, so all the bells and whistles are very different now. So far, in many ways, I like it better than the newest Mercedes. I don't like all the bells and whistles, but I do like the features this has without being as basic as a Toyota, Honda, Ford.
 

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Thanks @SciTchr.

My owner's manual is close to an inch thick, but I didn't bother to read it. I downloaded an electronic copy from mopar.com and searched for the things I was interested in rather than reading it front-to-back. I did find the info on page 301 as @ludtrichard mentioned. Guess I overlooked it.

At this point in my life, I don't need to save a few bucks by doing my own oil changes, so it doesn't really matter how many quarts it takes. I'll let the stealership handle it while it's under warranty and then find a reputable shop after that. Using an extractor is a bit of an overkill in my opinion. I recall some places doing that to change the rear differential fluid, but not motor oil.

My main worry is that some young tech doesn't over tighten or cross thread the drain plug. Does Chrysler use metal drain plugs or have they gone to the plastic type that you have to replace with every oil change like some other car manufacturers have? I heard Mercedes, BMW, and even Ford had gone to plastic drain plugs to be able to charge you an extra $5 per oil change. I haven't had a chance to get under my van yet.

I don't think the over inflated tires has anything to do with storage, at least not on the lot. The car arrived on the lot mid week and I contacted the dealership on Sat, had them hold it and I bought it on Mon. It's possible it was over inflated at the plant before it was loaded on the truck to be delivered to the dealership and they just didn't "prep" the car. The door tag says the vehicle was manufactured 3/22 and I bought it on 4/11/22. It still had the plastic protectors on the Uconnect screen, the Amazon FireTVs, etc., the mats were still in plastic bags, the vac hose wasn't installed. There's still white markings on the windows near the corners that I haven't cleaned off and I have no idea why they were there. Hopefully it was just an oversight and I can let 10 PSI out. With my previous (used) Mercedes vehicles, you had to "set" the TPMS system for the pressure that was your "normal" pressure and once it got to 10 PSI below the set point, the idiot light would go off on the dash. If you were one of those people who drove over 100 MPH a lot, and added 4 PSI, you'd want to set the default at that higher limit so that you weren't 15 PSI low before the indicator went off. I don't know if I need to reset the TPMS, or if it only alerts if one or more tires is off compared to the rest, or if it's a differential from some set point.

I haven't had a Chrysler since 2017, and that was an 2005 Town & Country Signature Series, so all the bells and whistles are very different now. So far, in many ways, I like it better than the newest Mercedes. I don't like all the bells and whistles, but I do like the features this has without being as basic as a Toyota, Honda, Ford.
The factory inflates tires higher than recommended but the dealers may not check them from what I understand. You shouldn't have to do anything with the TPMS.

We don't change oil either, but it was an opportunity for me to let you and others know that there are oil changing threads on the forum. I don't know if the plug is metal or plastic. I haven't been charged for a drain plug (now at 69,000 miles) after several dealer oil changes. There are some photos in the link I posted earlier so you could look and see what you think. Someone who changes oil might say whether the drain plug is metal or plastic.

It took awhile for me to get used to all the bells and whistles on the van. It seems like the things I needed to learn about were under the "multimedia" section of the manual or related to the UConnect system settings in the touchscreen. (The index of the manual wasn't that great in the past.) There are still features I don't use much, but I understand most of it now. Putting our music onto a small USB was the biggest hurdle, but it really is so much better than dealing with CDs (Yes, I'm in the older group of forum members.)
 

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With regards to the 45 psi experienced by 22Lemonted, my guess is the dealer did not fill the tires with nitrogen. You got the factory air at the higher transport/storage pressure. Hopefully you were not charged for the nitrogen.

I start planning for an oil change at around 10% life and change it before it drops below 5%. I do my own oil changes and use the extractor which allows everything to be done from the top of the engine rather than getting under the van.
 

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The dealership has a vested interest in you visiting as often as they can get you in there. 10K is fine.
With that said, oil changes is literally like a religion. Some people want to do it at 3k and think everyone else is crazy for waiting for more miles. While others are perfectly happy at 10k. So at the end of the day, you probably want to pick what you are comfortable with. One factor is time though... if you don't do a lot of miles, it's probably best to get it changed out annually.

For what it's worth, I think modern synthetics can go much longer than 5,000 miles and I will be following the maintenance indicator in the vehicle.
My grandfather was a mechanic for many years and he always told me if you do nothing else change your oil every 3k. But that was over 40 years ago. He may have been right at the time.
I'm with you, modern synthetic oils last longer and the vehicle manual says 10k is recommended.

I tend to follow my oil life indicator it averages to about 5k.
 

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My grandfather was a mechanic for many years and he always told me if you do nothing else change your oil every 3k. But that was over 40 years ago. He may have been right at the time.
I'm with you, modern synthetic oils last longer and the vehicle manual says 10k is recommended.

I tend to follow my oil life indicator it averages to about 5k.
My FIL was a car mechanic for years, then retired from a power plant as a mechanic. He and my dad were both the same way: Every 3K miles. But that was back in the '70's, '80's and '90's. Then synthetics came out and manufacturer's started recommending 7500 mi. When I did it myself, I was every 3K mi because I was using synthetic blends and not full synthetic. Once I turned 50, I let the mechanics deal with it when the car told me to service it. Fricking Mercedes won't tell you the oil grade, or any of the fluids so you can do it yourself. Then again, how many Mercedes drivers even do their own maintenance. My E350 didn't even have an oil dip stick to check the oil level.
 
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