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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Brand new 2021 AWD limited pacifica…

BFG KO2 255/55/r18 fits just fine and rides much better.. handling is better, comfort is better, bumps and curves are better.. no loss of mpg.. and given there is no spare, they are Bomb proof.. great tires that rarely fail.. a big win

all 4 tires filled to 50psi cold
Wheel Car Tire Vehicle Automotive tire
 

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2018 Chrysler Pacifica Touring L
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Just out of curiosity, why 50 psi.? I understand the psi. rating on the tire is the tire's max psi. and the psi listed on the door is the recommended psi. for the vehicle.
50 psi just seems a bit much.
 

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Just out of curiosity, why 50 psi.? I understand the psi. rating on the tire is the tire's max psi. and the psi listed on the door is the recommended psi. for the vehicle.
50 psi just seems a bit much.
I almost asked that but left it as the emoji to say it all.
 

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I know over inflation will cause the tread to wear out in the middle of the tires.
 

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I have those tires on my Wrangler and it recommends 37 psi and airing down for off roading. There’s a calculation based I think of vehicle weight and the weight capacity of the tire or the “chalk test”. 50 psi sounds high on any vehicle and particularly the Pacifica, but personally I’d do the chalk test to make sure you have the best pressure for the vehicle and tires. I agree they are great tires though as I had them on a previous Jeep as well and was happy to see them stock on the new Rubicon. They are heavy because of being so beefy so you might see a bit of MPG reduction but you’ll also have less chance of blowing one. They also look really nice on your van.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I expected a loss in MPG, we have not seen one.

50 psi, max is 65, door says 36. I may try a lower or higher pressure, this is what I started at when installed, I split the difference between the tire rating and the door… maybe if I had it at 36 I would see MPG loss, I’m not sure I haven’t tried.

it rides and handles great..the door jamb is not always what performers the best.. I have had BFG k02 on many vehicles for years.. I like them a bit higher psi than the MFG says on the door.. the door is for light weight tires.

As for “wearing out my suspension “ ygtbfkm!… I have pounded and pounded cars and trucks and minivans in the harshest of environments for hundreds of thousands of miles.. simply a ridiculous statement to say you use your tires as suspension… and yes tire pressure can change how a vehicle rides and handles, but the suspensions job is .. to.. well.. never mind…

I think they are quieter than stock , that is a surprise.. those stock Michelin premier a/s left much to be desired

I cant tell that they weigh more..non event.. the difference is small on an almost 5000lb vehicle
 

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I expected a loss in MPG, we have not seen one.

I think they are quieter than stock , that is a surprise.. those stock Michelin premier a/s left much to be desired

I cant tell that they weigh more..non event.. the difference is small on an almost 5000lb vehicle
I looked them up and they’re 35lbs for the size you got (which is nearly identical to the outer diameter of the stock tire so the speedometer remains accurate) while the stock tires are 28 lbs, not a huge difference. Also the best way to determine PSI is the chalk test so you see how well the tire is making contact with the road. This will vary based on exact vehicle configuration, weight, and load distribution. I’d be very interested to see what that determines. Anyways this tire is the route I think I’ll go when replacing my tires. Thanks for showing us.

P.S. anyone looking for an exact OEM tire size replacement all-terrain tire, the Wildpeak is an option.
 

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The number on the tire is the maximum pressure that tire can take. Go by the number on the door jamb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I looked them up and they’re 35lbs for the size you got (which is nearly identical to the outer diameter of the stock tire so the speedometer remains accurate) while the stock tires are 28 lbs, not a huge difference. Also the best way to determine PSI is the chalk test so you see how well the tire is making contact with the road. This will vary based on exact vehicle configuration, weight, and load distribution. I’d be very interested to see what that determines. Anyways this tire is the route I think I’ll go when replacing my tires. Thanks for showing us.

P.S. anyone looking for an exact OEM tire size replacement all-terrain tire, the Wildpeak is an option.
please describe how to do “the chalk test” , I’m interested

btw, I have heard good things about the wildpeak, but I have been using K02 on so many vehicles in so many brutal conditions.. far exceeding their stated capacities at times and they have never failed me… they are the best all around tire I have ever had, in every season and condition, from The coldest times in Montana to blazing summer in Yuma and all points between.. I can’t say enough about them

No fear of flats on fire roads and gravel roads in the pacifica awd…
 

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please describe how to do “the chalk test” , I’m interested

btw, I have heard good things about the wildpeak, but I have been using K02 on so many vehicles in so many brutal conditions.. far exceeding their stated capacities at times and they have never failed me… they are the best all around tire I have ever had, in every season and condition, from The coldest times in Montana to blazing summer in Yuma and all points between.. I can’t say enough about them

No fear of flats on fire roads and gravel roads in the pacifica awd…
The KO2s are better but Wildpeaks have more sizes available. I grabbed this chalk test info from Interco Tire:


Here are the simple tools you’ll need to use the chalk method to figure out a satisfactory PSI for your tires:
  • Chalk
  • A tire pressure gauge
  • Air (to fill up your tire)
  • A pen and paper (for noting PSI)
  • A dry, flat hard surface for testing.
With all of your materials and tools collected, Drive to a flat area. This can be your driveway or the street in front of your house. Just make sure there aren't a lot of cracks, bumps or pot holes in the ground. If you opt to do it in the road, please be careful and watch out for traffic. An empty parking lot is probably a more desirable location.
Air your tires up to maximum inflation. This should be marked on the side of your tires.
Next, draw a thick, straight line across the width of the tire. You’ll want to “chalk” the tread blocks all the way across (in a straight line) including the outer lugs. You may need to chalk two rows to get a good covering.
Now drive your vehicle in a straight line forward for about one complete car length.
Get out and inspect the chalk mark left on the ground and on the tire. A tire with the proper air pressure should press the chalk line evenly across the ground. This means you'll see the entire chalk line imprinted on the ground. An over-inflated tire will bulge (or crown) and only the center of the line will touch and be left on the ground. In this case you will only see a small portion of line left on the ground. Since you are aired to Max inflation, then this is what you should see.
Let out about 3lbs of air, and repeat this process.
As you test your tire this way you will start to see a more complete line of chalk on the ground. You will have to keep letting air out until you see a complete line of chalk on the ground.
If you're tire is underinflated, you'll see only the sides of the lines since the middle of the tire is not making contact with the ground.
You will need to keep adjusting your tire's air pressure according to the chalk test results until you find the pressure that is satisfactory to you. Keep in mind that you will need to do this test on both the front and rear tires to find the proper inflation for both which may or may not be the same. Record this information and keep it in your vehicle for future reference. As your tires wear you may need to perform this test again to confirm proper PSI. Also
A Word of Caution: The proper air pressure for the original equipment tires has been determined by the vehicles manufacturer, but when larger tires are installed the air pressure recommended by the factor for the original equipment tires may not apply to a larger size tire. Two things come into play concerning the load carrying capacity of tires. These two things are; the volume of air and air pressure. The larger tire has the greater volume of air. When attempting to determine an air pressure number by using the “chalk” method you may find that the tread foot print is nice and flat at a very low pressure. When this is the case the air pressure you come up with may very well be too low for highway service. Even though the “chalk” test gave you a full tread contact patch, at a low pressure the tire may not be stable at highway speeds. The large volume of air can support the load, but the low pressure causes the tire to become unstable. If air pressure is too low for highway service the tire will run hot from over flexing and will cause fast tread wear due to the “squirming”. This overheating can also cause a tire to fail.
Another Chalk Method for Determining Proper PSI
Air your tires up to maximum inflation. This should be marked on the side of your tires.
Draw a thick, straight line across the width of the tire. You’ll want to “chalk” the tread blocks all the way across (in a straight line) including the outer lugs. You may need to chalk two rows to get a good covering.
Now drive your vehicle in a straight line forward for about 50 to 100 feet. Stop. Then back up in the same straight line back to your starting point. Get out and inspect the chalk mark on your tire. Since your tire is at max inflation only the center part of the chalk should be erased. An over-inflated tire will bulge (or crown) and only the center of the line will touch the ground thus erasing the chalk.
Let out about 3lbs of air, and repeat this process.
As you test your tire this way you will start to see a more of chalk removed across the line you chalked on your tire. Keep adjusting your tire's air pressure by letting out 3lbs of air at a time according to the chalk test results.
If you let too much air out you will see that there is more chalk in the center of the tire and it is erasing from the edges. This is because the weight of the vehicle is pressing more on the outside of the tire, and the middle section is not making contact with the ground. If this happens add back air and retest.
You will need to keep adjusting your tire's air pressure according to the chalk test results until you find the pressure that is satisfactory to you. Keep in mind that you will need to do this test on both the front and rear tires to find the proper inflation for both which may or may not be the same. Record this information and keep it in your vehicle for future reference. As your tires wear you may need to perform this test again to confirm proper PSI.”
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The KO2s are better but Wildpeaks have more sizes available. I grabbed this chalk test info from Interco Tire:


Here are the simple tools you’ll need to use the chalk method to figure out a satisfactory PSI for your tires:
  • Chalk
  • A tire pressure gauge
  • Air (to fill up your tire)
  • A pen and paper (for noting PSI)
  • A dry, flat hard surface for testing.
With all of your materials and tools collected, Drive to a flat area. This can be your driveway or the street in front of your house. Just make sure there aren't a lot of cracks, bumps or pot holes in the ground. If you opt to do it in the road, please be careful and watch out for traffic. An empty parking lot is probably a more desirable location.
Air your tires up to maximum inflation. This should be marked on the side of your tires.
Next, draw a thick, straight line across the width of the tire. You’ll want to “chalk” the tread blocks all the way across (in a straight line) including the outer lugs. You may need to chalk two rows to get a good covering.
Now drive your vehicle in a straight line forward for about one complete car length.
Get out and inspect the chalk mark left on the ground and on the tire. A tire with the proper air pressure should press the chalk line evenly across the ground. This means you'll see the entire chalk line imprinted on the ground. An over-inflated tire will bulge (or crown) and only the center of the line will touch and be left on the ground. In this case you will only see a small portion of line left on the ground. Since you are aired to Max inflation, then this is what you should see.
Let out about 3lbs of air, and repeat this process.
As you test your tire this way you will start to see a more complete line of chalk on the ground. You will have to keep letting air out until you see a complete line of chalk on the ground.
If you're tire is underinflated, you'll see only the sides of the lines since the middle of the tire is not making contact with the ground.
You will need to keep adjusting your tire's air pressure according to the chalk test results until you find the pressure that is satisfactory to you. Keep in mind that you will need to do this test on both the front and rear tires to find the proper inflation for both which may or may not be the same. Record this information and keep it in your vehicle for future reference. As your tires wear you may need to perform this test again to confirm proper PSI. Also
A Word of Caution: The proper air pressure for the original equipment tires has been determined by the vehicles manufacturer, but when larger tires are installed the air pressure recommended by the factor for the original equipment tires may not apply to a larger size tire. Two things come into play concerning the load carrying capacity of tires. These two things are; the volume of air and air pressure. The larger tire has the greater volume of air. When attempting to determine an air pressure number by using the “chalk” method you may find that the tread foot print is nice and flat at a very low pressure. When this is the case the air pressure you come up with may very well be too low for highway service. Even though the “chalk” test gave you a full tread contact patch, at a low pressure the tire may not be stable at highway speeds. The large volume of air can support the load, but the low pressure causes the tire to become unstable. If air pressure is too low for highway service the tire will run hot from over flexing and will cause fast tread wear due to the “squirming”. This overheating can also cause a tire to fail.
Another Chalk Method for Determining Proper PSI
Air your tires up to maximum inflation. This should be marked on the side of your tires.
Draw a thick, straight line across the width of the tire. You’ll want to “chalk” the tread blocks all the way across (in a straight line) including the outer lugs. You may need to chalk two rows to get a good covering.
Now drive your vehicle in a straight line forward for about 50 to 100 feet. Stop. Then back up in the same straight line back to your starting point. Get out and inspect the chalk mark on your tire. Since your tire is at max inflation only the center part of the chalk should be erased. An over-inflated tire will bulge (or crown) and only the center of the line will touch the ground thus erasing the chalk.
Let out about 3lbs of air, and repeat this process.
As you test your tire this way you will start to see a more of chalk removed across the line you chalked on your tire. Keep adjusting your tire's air pressure by letting out 3lbs of air at a time according to the chalk test results.
If you let too much air out you will see that there is more chalk in the center of the tire and it is erasing from the edges. This is because the weight of the vehicle is pressing more on the outside of the tire, and the middle section is not making contact with the ground. If this happens add back air and retest.
You will need to keep adjusting your tire's air pressure according to the chalk test results until you find the pressure that is satisfactory to you. Keep in mind that you will need to do this test on both the front and rear tires to find the proper inflation for both which may or may not be the same. Record this information and keep it in your vehicle for future reference. As your tires wear you may need to perform this test again to confirm proper PSI.”
thanks !!!
 

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...they’re 35lbs for the size you got (which is nearly identical to the outer diameter of the stock tire so the speedometer remains accurate) while the stock tires are 28 lbs...
How Do Lightweight Wheels Affect Your Car's Performance?

28lb to 35lb, that’s 25% increase in weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
How Do Lightweight Wheels Affect Your Car's Performance?

28lb to 35lb, that’s 25% increase in weight.
If I were selling replacement lightweight wheels for classic cars, I would write that article as well..

It’s a nothing burger on a 2021 Pacifica AWD
 
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