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Not sure if this is the right place to post this, let me know if not.

I have a new 2018 regular gas Touring L.

Looking for ideas. Inexpensive, relatively easy improvements that you may have made, and how they've worked out.

Getting out of a Civic where I was around 30MPG average. So far, after a week in the van, I'm averaging 20MPG. I'm doing all city driving, stop and go commuting. Know it's 2 vastly different vehicles, but thought I'd ask for help to maximize my van mileage.

Thanks for any input you may have.
 

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Not sure if this is the right place to post this, let me know if not.

I have a new 2018 regular gas Touring L.

Looking for ideas. Inexpensive, relatively easy improvements that you may have made, and how they've worked out.

Getting out of a Civic where I was around 30MPG average. So far, after a week in the van, I'm averaging 20MPG. I'm doing all city driving, stop and go commuting. Know it's 2 vastly different vehicles, but thought I'd ask for help to maximize my van mileage.

Thanks for any input you may have.
Are you using the ESS? Other than that, coast to stops, light on the gas pedal, keep the speed to a steady 50 mph which isn't too likely in city driving. Looks like you are doing pretty good for mostly city driving.
 

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Buy a good dial tire gauge and keep tires inflated 2-3 PSI above what the door sticker says. Check the pressure regularly.
Follow what LongTimeMopar said.
 

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Forget about the door sticker. What does the sidewall say? Inflate to there.
No, that is incorrect. Optimal pressure is based on the vehicle, which is found on the door sticker. The sidewall usually has the max cold pressure for max load, which is usually way above recommended.

Personally I keep it slightly above recommendation but nowhere near max cold/load.
 

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Optimal for what? A cushy ride that some focus group loved. Ford went so mushy once that Firestone got blamed for their rollovers.

I'll let the suspension and overall mass soak up the bumps, and I'll make the tires as hard as the tire manufacturer rates them for. Mushy tires burn gas like roof racks.
 

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The driver is the key

The single thing that most affects fuel efficiency in any given vehicle is the driver and their habits / their right foot.
I always anticipate traffic lights to avoid a complete stop, if possible, especially if no one is behind me. So doing can be annoying the drivers behind me who are jack rabbits.

When you look at the MPG gauge you see how much gas is consumed starting and stopping.
 

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Optimal for what? A cushy ride that some focus group loved. Ford went so mushy once that Firestone got blamed for their rollovers.

I'll let the suspension and overall mass soak up the bumps, and I'll make the tires as hard as the tire manufacturer rates them for. Mushy tires burn gas like roof racks.
No. I hope nobody follows your advice.

I think the Ford/Firestone controversy was over 20 years ago, that's literally the last century. And Ford's recommended settings was ridiculous from what I remember, well under 30psi (dont quote me, I'm too lazy to google). A lot has changed since then, obviously.

Setting the pressure to tire max does help rolling resistance, but at the expense of handling, braking, cornering, wet conditions, dry conditions, snow conditions, pot holes, tire wear, contact patch, and yes comfort, as well as probably a bunch of other things I can't think of off the top of my head.

Running tires at max press is absolutely sub-optimal.
 

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When I got my car new, the dealer had my tires set at 44 PSI all around. The ride is hard as a rock, and the gas mileage has sucked even with pressure up pretty high. I'm hoping another couple thousand miles or after the first oil change that things get better.
 

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When I got my car new, the dealer had my tires set at 44 PSI all around. The ride is hard as a rock, and the gas mileage has sucked even with pressure up pretty high. I'm hoping another couple thousand miles or after the first oil change that things get better.
It's shipped from the factory at higher pressure, the dealer's supposed to lower it. What's it at now?
 

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When I got my car new, the dealer had my tires set at 44 PSI all around. The ride is hard as a rock, and the gas mileage has sucked even with pressure up pretty high. I'm hoping another couple thousand miles or after the first oil change that things get better.
As @Frig suggested, your dealer screwed up the pre-delivery prep. 44 PSI is used to reduce bounce and sway when tied down on the transport truck (truck drivers just hate it when their load does the bounce and sway thing :) ). 36 PSI is the factory recommendation. 2 PSI over probably doesn't hurt.

The previous suggestion that you use the higher sidewall "max" figure is wrong, and dangerous. That number is the maximum pressure that the tire can safely withstand while being driven, and NOT the normal use pressure.
 
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