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2022 Pacifica Limited Hybrid
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I'm not going to argue with you, but are you sure your 22mpg wasn't mixed usage?


The EPA cycle every auto maker games to death. If they advertise 19mpg city you really shouldn't be getting more than 19mpg. Automakers are literally allowed to set it up in the best possible scenario.

Either you are traveling on long 45 mph roads (some larger cities have 45+ mph feeder roads which is more highway than anything), or you are counting some highway use in your trip odometer.


My wife's usage was literally 5 miles down a 30-35mph road with 6-7 stoplights. 4 times a day. Absolutely zero highway or speeds in excess of 40 mph. Often for several weeks straight since she was just taking the kids to daycare and working from home (ironic). The literal definition of City EPA mileage. Also my city has poorly synchronized stop lights.

So pretty much whatever was on our trip average fuel economy was pure city mileage.
well that explains it! The motor does not reach operating temperature until you drive 7-10 miles. Your wife is in open loop 100% of the time. The gas mileage will easily be 50% on trips 5 miles long. My wife’s stop and go city drives are 15 miles or so.
 

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2018 Pacifica Hybrid Limited
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The EV charge and “electric only” feature will eventually catch up with some pachy owners, and the warranty battery replacement battles at 8 yrs and 100k mi should get interesting. The batteries are not going to last as long as a normal non-EV hybrid or an all electric EV because the batteries are being “cycled to death” when being fully charged and fully depleted almost daily. That is the only big drawback, as they are seeing 5x more battery cycles than a full EV Tesla or Mustang that only needs charged once a week to go 250 miles. Tesla batteries hold up well at 100k mi, a Pacifica that sees 80%+ electric use won’t. High charge cycle count results in battery death, period. Mark my words….
This is a great point. Lifestyle can play a huge role in this. My 2012 Chevy Volt is still getting it's factory 33 miles of EV range. Biggest factor is it sits in that garage or parking deck charging mostly without me running the battery all the way out with 115k miles on the odie. I don't drive tons of miles so the cycles are slow and gentle. If you are a road warrior fully cycling the battery every day in any PHEV, I could see battery degradation becoming an issue over time, but if you don't drive too much and can baby your batteries by keeping them from roasting in the summer sun it seems like battery longevity is proving itself not a huge issue for the industry. I find the Pachy is way harder on it's battery than the Volt because of the weight, form factor, smaller reserve buffer, and more aggressive throttle mapping.
 

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2018 Pacifica Hybrid Limited
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The MPG of all cars depends on the speed at which the car is driven, but more so with hybrid cars. This is because the wind drag force is proportional to the squared of the can speed, as opposed to the linear speed.

If the wind drag is the main force that the car must overcome, here is the calculated Pacifica mpg vs mph in its hybrid mode; and my 2020 Pacifica hybrid closely follows the number on relatively flat highways (e.g. from Maryland to Florida along the I-95). So if your 28 mpg is from driving at around 70 mph, it is right inline with my experience.

On mountainous highways (e.g. from Maryland through Pennsylvania) the overall mpg is lower because the Pacifica hybrid is quite heavy at over 5,000lb, the engine must work extra hard (and burn extra fuel) uphill; downhill coasting does not quite offset the extra fuel burned on uphill as we typically need to apply brakes to comply with the speed limits.

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This is the most useful posting I've seen here. I have the helpful perspective of my parents owning a 2018 Limited Pachy, and myself owning a 2018 Pachy Hybrid Limited. My thoughts are that the ICE pacifica has a really great tranny. Those 9 gears really help the ICE stay in an effective efficiency range especially at high speeds on the highway. Secondly, the ICE pachy is a lighter vehicle due to no hybrid batteries, ev motor, magnets, heavier 2nd row seats ect. Given that both vehicles have the same ICE under the hood, in my experience it shouldn't be surprising that the ICE only vehicle gets better gas mileage relative to the hybrid the faster you road trip. On road trips in the standard ICE staying between 70-80, I easily get 30mpg. With the hybrid, it's a real struggle to get over 25mpg at the same speeds and the delta only increases the faster you go on mostly flat highway driving. This surprised me when I first got the hybrid, but in truth it shouldn't have. I mainly chalk this up to the 9 speed gearing and the lower curb weight at fast highway speeds. For someone who drives lots of highway miles at high speeds, the standard Pacifica would likely be a better fit than the hybrid from an overall cost/efficiency standpoint. For someone who does mostly suburban/urban daily driving at low speeds, and only occasional road trips, the hybrid will probably be a better fit. My overall combined MPG from mixed driving is way higher than my parents because we do both live in the same hilly metro area and around town the standard Pacifica/tranny combo is no match for the EV motor torque. But if you really want to hypermile on a long road trip with no charging, you'll have better luck with a normal Pacifica.
 

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2022 Pacifica Limited Hybrid
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This is the most useful posting I've seen here. I have the helpful perspective of my parents owning a 2018 Limited Pachy, and myself owning a 2018 Pachy Hybrid Limited. My thoughts are that the ICE pacifica has a really great tranny. Those 9 gears really help the ICE stay in an effective efficiency range especially at high speeds on the highway. Secondly, the ICE pachy is a lighter vehicle due to no hybrid batteries, ev motor, magnets, heavier 2nd row seats ect. Given that both vehicles have the same ICE under the hood, in my experience it shouldn't be surprising that the ICE only vehicle gets better gas mileage relative to the hybrid the faster you road trip. On road trips in the standard ICE staying between 70-80, I easily get 30mpg. With the hybrid, it's a real struggle to get over 25mpg at the same speeds and the delta only increases the faster you go on mostly flat highway driving. This surprised me when I first got the hybrid, but in truth it shouldn't have. I mainly chalk this up to the 9 speed gearing and the lower curb weight at fast highway speeds. For someone who drives lots of highway miles at high speeds, the standard Pacifica would likely be a better fit than the hybrid from an overall cost/efficiency standpoint. For someone who does mostly suburban/urban daily driving at low speeds, and only occasional road trips, the hybrid will probably be a better fit. My overall combined MPG from mixed driving is way higher than my parents because we do both live in the same hilly metro area and around town the standard Pacifica/tranny combo is no match for the EV motor torque. But if you really want to hypermile on a long road trip with no charging, you'll have better luck with a normal Pacifica.
My 2022 Pacifica Hybrid totally crushes my 2019 Pacifica Gas on the highway. To be clear, I’m talking same owner, same driver, same roads, same driving habits. I get 30-36 mpg in the Hybrid, but only 27-30 in the gas version. I drive around 70 mph on the highway. The coefficient of drag of the two vans is identical. This is not a legitimate reason for the hybrid version to get comparatively worse economy over 70 mph. The extra weight of the battery pack has minimal effect on efficiency, since regen recovers much of the additional losses going up hill. Engine rpm could be a factor, but as we all know, the 9 speed is really only a 7 speed and spins near 2k rpm at 70 mph. All Pacificas except for model year 2017 have upshifts into 8th and 9th gear disabled over 59 mph, unless you use cruise control downhill with no engine load to temporarily force an upshift. The engine has plenty of torque to pull the vehicle on level in 8th or 9th, but it is next to impossible to engage and steadily cruise in these gears. To the point, cumulative operating cost is a function of average gas mileage, not peak highway gas mileage. My 2019 Pacifica gas vehicle got 23mpg in mixed use, the 2022 Hybrid consistently gets over 30mpg average in the SAME mixed use with no EV charge. However the real day-to-day benefits come when you plug in. My mpg meter continually shows over 60 mpg, occasionally up to 85mpge. I have used roughly one tank of gas in over 4 months of ownership, and the average fuel cost to operate (gas plus KWH fees) is less than 1/4th the gas version. The hybrid version is costing me 5 cents per mile with 80% electric and 20% hybrid use, while the gas Pacifica has cost me 21 cents per mile at $5/gal. I don’t know anyone who runs 100% highway, so comparing efficiency at 70mph is sort of moot. In conclusion, fuel costs for my gas ICE version Pacifica were 4x more per mile compared to my hybrid EV version. The difference is huge.
 

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2021 Pacifica Limited Hybrid
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This is the most useful posting I've seen here. I have the helpful perspective of my parents owning a 2018 Limited Pachy, and myself owning a 2018 Pachy Hybrid Limited. My thoughts are that the ICE pacifica has a really great tranny. Those 9 gears really help the ICE stay in an effective efficiency range especially at high speeds on the highway. Secondly, the ICE pachy is a lighter vehicle due to no hybrid batteries, ev motor, magnets, heavier 2nd row seats ect. Given that both vehicles have the same ICE under the hood, in my experience it shouldn't be surprising that the ICE only vehicle gets better gas mileage relative to the hybrid the faster you road trip. On road trips in the standard ICE staying between 70-80, I easily get 30mpg. With the hybrid, it's a real struggle to get over 25mpg at the same speeds and the delta only increases the faster you go on mostly flat highway driving. This surprised me when I first got the hybrid, but in truth it shouldn't have. I mainly chalk this up to the 9 speed gearing and the lower curb weight at fast highway speeds. For someone who drives lots of highway miles at high speeds, the standard Pacifica would likely be a better fit than the hybrid from an overall cost/efficiency standpoint. For someone who does mostly suburban/urban daily driving at low speeds, and only occasional road trips, the hybrid will probably be a better fit. My overall combined MPG from mixed driving is way higher than my parents because we do both live in the same hilly metro area and around town the standard Pacifica/tranny combo is no match for the EV motor torque. But if you really want to hypermile on a long road trip with no charging, you'll have better luck with a normal Pacifica.
I have no idea where you are getting 25mpg highway for the hybrid. Like @Lscman we get 30-35+ hwy. Heck, we did 32mpg last year in over 1000 miles of driving with 5 people, 4 bikes on the back, and a full width roof box...
 

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2022 Pacifica Limited Hybrid
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One thing to note: the instantaneous gas mileage displayed in Hybrid ICE gas operation mode is terribly misleading on the highway. When you are at <0% battery reading and the engine is running on level, your instantaneous mpg meter may only show 18-25mpg or so. This is because the motor is simultaneously propelling the vehicle while dumping juice into the battery when lightly loaded, not to mention times when your motor is not running at all but you are covering miles on battery. The average gas mileage can be better-trusted because it includes ICE propulsion and regen power recovery and battery operation on level and downhill sections. The best way to measure fuel consumption without any electric charge is to obviously use a pencil and paper with fillip and miles. My hybrid avg mpg meter is quite accurate.
 

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As Rock posted above, comparing mpg across different driving styles isn't going to get any consensus. As a 'brisk' driver who tends to go with fast traffic, a highway road trip can be as low as 25 mpg. A fully charged battery that can get 30+ miles in city traffic with a light foot may only go 25 miles when consistently accelerating right below the threshold where the ICE would turn on (and much less in winter if the heater's on, and only 20 miles on the highway with the cruise set at 77 mph). As with the Prius hypermilers, one can certainly adjust behavior to get the desired result. For me, I'm happy enough being able to go all electric in 90% of my daily driving, even though I'll never get even close to the 88 MPGe. I will contend that if one primarily does extended highway driving, that a PacHy isn't the best choice. It's the city driving where this car shines.
 

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As Rock posted above, comparing mpg across different driving styles isn't going to get any consensus. As a 'brisk' driver who tends to go with fast traffic, a highway road trip can be as low as 25 mpg. A fully charged battery that can get 30+ miles in city traffic with a light foot may only go 25 miles when consistently accelerating right below the threshold where the ICE would turn on (and much less in winter if the heater's on, and only 20 miles on the highway with the cruise set at 77 mph). As with the Prius hypermilers, one can certainly adjust behavior to get the desired result. For me, I'm happy enough being able to go all electric in 90% of my daily driving, even though I'll never get even close to the 88 MPGe. I will contend that if one primarily does extended highway driving, that a PacHy isn't the best choice. It's the city driving where this car shines.
I agree. The city driving moniker is a bit misleading. My Pacifica Hybrid gets tremendous efficiency so long as it is not blasting down the highway at 70+ mph. I am typically driving rural back roads, and to a lesser extent suburban use, with some stop and go strip mall duty. With my driving style, it gets 75-80mpge and 35 miles per charge doing this. A recent 45 mile round trip was completed on all electric, I’ve seen a low of 30 a couple times, neither typical. My gas hybrid mixed use operating efficiency runs around 32 to 36 mpg, and highway cruise efficiency at 62-65mph is very similar. Both gas and electric efficiency falls like a rock over 68 mph on highway. I do not drive aggressively and drive for weeks without engaging ICE. I have used 1 tank of gas in 6k mi.
 

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…I will contend that if one primarily does extended highway driving, that a PacHy isn't the best choice. It's the city driving where this car shines.
Actually, I have found our PacHy Ltd to be a pretty nice highway vehicle as well. Most of the time we drive in town on electric but when we take road trips we consistently get 32+ mpg which is at least 33% better than our previous Honda Odyssey. We have also found it to be very quiet even with the ICE running. I believe that some of that is due to the active noise cancellation system.
 
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