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Discussion Starter #1
Was looking for an EVSE for home use. I don't really need all the wifi, monitoring, scheduling, etc. that some of nicer ones have. So, I was looking around and found the Jekayla EVSE. They seem to be the OEM that makes them for other companies like Mustart and others. I did read where the J1772 plug is a snug fit, but that is the only negative I have found about it. I also just noticed they have a 2019 version that looks to be resigned. Has anyone tried the 2019 version or the older one on the van and found it to fit to snug? Any reason not to use a portable EVSE everyday instead of something like a wall mounted JuiceBox if you don't need all the bells and whistles?

Jekayla EVSE 2019 version
 

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The charger is actually in the car.
The EVSE is actually just a control unit that communicates with the car to set the cars charger current level. It EVSE does contain safety sensing just like a ground fault isolator (GFI) There is no reason to buy a more expensive unit. Note there is no difference in electrical efficiency since that is totally dependant on the car's internal charger.
 

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Portable charger use every day is fine . Probably better for your battery due to lower heating of battery and charger in the car.

For home unit get a Siemens Versicharge . I just installed one . These are cheap on ebay. The quality is good and has adjustable current 32A , 24A, 16A, 8A on 240V

You can get these for around $320 and are safe to use.

Dont trust the China stuff to be complaint to safety standards.
Most do not pass the diod test or short test.
The charger is a GFCI and makes sure there is no power applied when car is not ready for power . And should cut the power in case of internal short.
The charger also makes sure the contractor inside is not faulted ( welded contacts) . Which would be dangerous to you in case of working in rain.
Better play it safe.
Go with a proven solution

Also the Pacifica factory charger can do 240V at 12A with a simple adapter = 6h charge time. That is your cheapest option and is safe. The pacifica charger is good quality and can do 120V or 240V charging no problem . Same as the newer Volt chargers.
The adapter to go from 240V plug to 120V plug will set you back ~$30..$40
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Got my 14-50 outlet installed today. The 2019 version of the Jekayla Level 2 40 Amp Portable Electric Vehicle Charger should be here next week. The older version has good reviews and if you include the Mustart one that is just a branded Jekayla then it has hundreds of reviews. So, hoping the 2019 version works pretty good.
 

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Check this review out
It checks all the functions of the charger type you mention. Sure there is a lot of reviews but never compromise safety . At the end insurance will blame you if something happens while using a non UL listed device.
Cant add link so look for jT8IsAd9ea0 on youtube or (Aliexpress 32A (7kW) portable EV chargers ( EVSE ) Zencar, Khons)

Yes they work and yes they are almost as safe as the brand names. But they are not tested to meet UL requirements. Some even have a UL symbol and CE symbol but without the reference number it means nothing other than they are cheating on the safety testing.

You will in the end most likely be fine but these are serious power devices and fires could be caused easily .
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Jekayla appears to make the Zencar and Mustart EVSE or at least some of them. And, on Amazon they both are UL listed with a number. I don't know if the Jekayla I ordered will be UL listed or not. I will look for it when I get it.
 

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Jekayla appears to make the Zencar and Mustart EVSE or at least some of them. And, on Amazon they both are UL listed with a number. I don't know if the Jekayla I ordered will be UL listed or not. I will look for it when I get it.
Good luck to you - I really doubt it is truly UL listed - but might be wrong (many examples of china product with fake UL/CE badges ). Check out the video the devices do not even comply to SAE J1772 which they claim they do. Diod test fails on most of these Amazon specials - even zencar model fail the test. In general i think they are OK build but you are entrusting your life and belongings to this stuff.

If the budget is tight use the factory charger on the 240V outlet . That will charge in 6h .

For example the UL file for the Versicharge is E348556 and you can find that it is truly tested to comply for the whole family of products that that company makes.
I looked up the Zencar UL file and that E364477 and its not for the charger but the plug that goes into the car. That is better than nothing.

ZHANGJIAGANG UCHEN NEW ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. E364477
No.999 Yongjin Rd, Miaoqiao
Tangqiao Town
Zhangjiagang, Jiangsu 215611 CHINA
 

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Check this review out
It checks all the functions of the charger type you mention. Sure there is a lot of reviews but never compromise safety . At the end insurance will blame you if something happens while using a non UL listed device.
Cant add link so look for jT8IsAd9ea0 on youtube or (Aliexpress 32A (7kW) portable EV chargers ( EVSE ) Zencar, Khons)

Yes they work and yes they are almost as safe as the brand names. But they are not tested to meet UL requirements. Some even have a UL symbol and CE symbol but without the reference number it means nothing other than they are cheating on the safety testing.

You will in the end most likely be fine but these are serious power devices and fires could be caused easily .

This KHONS EVSE has only one review, but it is detailed and believable.


I still remain a fan of OpenEVSE. This is a reasonable priced US product and it is open sourced- you know what is inside both in hardware and software and can be confident in absence of behind the scene shenanigans- like not implemented diode or ground checks, or cheap overheating contactor and wiring.
 

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I agree OpenEVSE is a good product with proven testing practices. I would not be afraid to use that product especially if you want some of the advanced features like wifi and data collection.

But for a simple charger get a good commercial product not a wanna be product.

BTW I almost bought the Zen charger but then saw the review and it not meeting the SAE specs. who knows what else is missing. Got the Siemens charger and I am happy with it.
 

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Kawal
Can you suggest a 240v to 120v adapter?
Thank you

Pretty sure there is no commercial plug to buy that will do it. People do sell them online but way easier to make one yourself.
I cant put any links in the posting so that is not helping but serach this forum and you will find what you need . $25 of parts at Box store.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Found another version of the Jekayla 2019 on amazon, here. No reviews or anything. It says it is UL listed. That number appears at productspec.ul.com. My guess is they are using UL listed parts, but not getting the product UL approved and/or having the follow up approvals done at the factory. Isn't that what OpenEVSE does or at least did in the past? Although open source does add some piece of mind to it. Using a 220v adapter on the stock EVSE would invalidate the UL listing also. I would think an insurance company would be less likely to pay out if I was pushing 220v through the stock 110v EVSE listed device vs a 220v EVSE I bought on amazon.

None of the desktops in my house are UL listed as I built them from what I assume are UL listed parts. But, the product as a whole was never tested. While not 40amps at 220v, 600 or 700 watts can still be dangerous. If you have ever replaced a cord on an appliance I wouldn't think it would still be UL listed. Basically what I am saying is I think UL listed is nice to have. But, I think online reviews also say a lot about the product. Online reviews tend to be more negative based for a product as people to tend write reviews more to complain than to praise products. So, a large numbers of fires or defects that cause issues should show up in reviews. Even UL listed products have issues an recalls.

I don't have the ability to test the Jekayla when it comes to different fault cases or get accurate temperature readings of the internals. But, I will reply with any UL markings I see and how warm it gets to the touch when I use it. One of the reasons I picked the Jekayla was they seem to be the OEM for several different brands, so they should have a large number of EVSE's out there.
 

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I am sure you will be fine with the product you pick.
If you unplug it after the charge is done and you are always around when charging you should be fine.

Do a review of the product after you used it for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I will post a follow up in this thread about it. I actually plan to just leave it plugged up all the time when it is in the garage just like I do with the stock EVSE. I will be in the house 99% of the time it is plugged up though.
 

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I will post a follow up in this thread about it. I actually plan to just leave it plugged up all the time when it is in the garage just like I do with the stock EVSE. I will be in the house 99% of the time it is plugged up though.
Hopefully, someone will do a comparison of these low-buck EVSEs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
So, far no issues. The plug end has the number XH208 E257089. Which google says is for power supply cords certified for Canada. The EVSE body doesn't appear to have any number on it. Just an FC, CE, and TUVRheinland mark. I have seen the temperature reading get up to 47C. I think the temp is the EVSE temp, but neither the unit or cord is really warm. I take that as a good sign. Volts jump around from 220 to 256 with amps holding pretty steady at 29ish. The watts show around 6.6Kwh. I have seen it hit 7.1Kwh though. I assume that is when the volts jumped up for a second. The J1772 plug is a snug fit compared to the factory one, so no change there from the old to new 2019 model as that was mentioned on the Amazon reviews also. Not sure how long the blue color will last though. I think it may scratch off easily based on looking around one of the screw holes if something hard and sharp hits it. But for $358.95 (Amazon clip and save $20 coupon) when I bought it, it seems to work fine.

I have noticed when charging the van will spin up the fan a couple of times during the charging sessions. It never did that with the stock charger, but I assume that is because it is charging so much faster and thus producing more heat. The car is in a garage with outside temps hitting low 90's during the day.

It would be nice to find a review of all these cheaper EVSE, so we could compare them. I also wish a more well known brand like JuiceBox would make a cheaper version without all the bells and whistles.
 

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So, far no issues. The plug end has the number XH208 E257089. Which google says is for power supply cords certified for Canada. The EVSE body doesn't appear to have any number on it. Just an FC, CE, and TUVRheinland mark. I have seen the temperature reading get up to 47C. I think the temp is the EVSE temp, but neither the unit or cord is really warm. I take that as a good sign. Volts jump around from 220 to 256 with amps holding pretty steady at 29ish. The watts show around 6.6Kwh. I have seen it hit 7.1Kwh though. I assume that is when the volts jumped up for a second. The J1772 plug is a snug fit compared to the factory one, so no change there from the old to new 2019 model as that was mentioned on the Amazon reviews also. Not sure how long the blue color will last though. I think it may scratch off easily based on looking around one of the screw holes if something hard and sharp hits it. But for $358.95 (Amazon clip and save $20 coupon) when I bought it, it seems to work fine.

I have noticed when charging the van will spin up the fan a couple of times during the charging sessions. It never did that with the stock charger, but I assume that is because it is charging so much faster and thus producing more heat. The car is in a garage with outside temps hitting low 90's during the day.

It would be nice to find a review of all these cheaper EVSE, so we could compare them. I also wish a more well known brand like JuiceBox would make a cheaper version without all the bells and whistles.

The fan and coolant pump will both spin up for a while while fast charging @32A or 24A or 16A. Depending on outside temperature and car temperature. I charge at 24A 240V and the coolant gets fairly hot most likely due to the losses in the charging circuit and battery (2h after driving in a 95F weather). Most likely the most efficient charging is at 240V 12A @ 2.8KW or 120V 12A @ 1.4KW. The car seems to not heat up much at all at 12A.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The fan and coolant pump will both spin up for a while while fast charging @32A or 24A or 16A. Depending on outside temperature and car temperature. I charge at 24A 240V and the coolant gets fairly hot most likely due to the losses in the charging circuit and battery (2h after driving in a 95F weather). Most likely the most efficient charging is at 240V 12A @ 2.8KW or 120V 12A @ 1.4KW. The car seems to not heat up much at all at 12A.
Wonder if the fan or pump fail or are unable to keep up with the heat will the car request less amps or maybe even zero amps to prevent it from getting to hot?
 

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I have no idea but I would think the temperature will rise and the car should have a fault for over temperature and discontinue charging. I am sure there is a number of safety futures built into the car. But for now lets assume the car monitors the temperature and when is determined it is too hot range it turns on pump and fan to cool it off. The same sensor can be used to trip a fault if the temperature keeps rising. There are more than one sensors - battery has temperature sensors, Charging unit has sensors.

The car has total control of the charging current based on the max current communicated by the charger. Normally it would use up to 32A if the charger can provide it.


If you want to test it , you could find the pump and disconnect it or sensor and disconnect that and try charging at 32A . See what happens.

I charge at 24A to reduce the some of the stress on the car and the cables.
When the weather is hot you can tell the cables are heating up a little @ 24A . In colder weather you cant tell at all. At 32A you can definitely tell the current is causing heat. So the more current the more heat the less efficient. Lower current = takes longer but less waste on heat.
 
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