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I tried an experiment the other day driving on a flat road at a constant speed of about 30mph. It was in electric mode and in D, the readout said 56mpg while in L it went to 99mpg. No lifting of the accelerator on my part so the question is , is this real or some fluke on the way mpg is calculated.
 

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I tried an experiment the other day driving on a flat road at a constant speed of about 30mph. It was in electric mode and in D, the readout said 56mpg while in L it went to 99mpg. No lifting of the accelerator on my part so the question is , is this real or some fluke on the way mpg is calculated?
 

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You mean like this? It’s in my gas Pacifica and I can make it happen :D. IMG_3591.jpg
IMG_3589.jpg

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I tried an experiment the other day driving on a flat road at a constant speed of about 30mph. It was in electric mode and in D, the readout said 56mpg while in L it went to 99mpg. No lifting of the accelerator on my part so the question is , is this real or some fluke on the way mpg is calculated?
Did the van eventually slow down some when you switched to L?
 

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I tried an experiment the other day driving on a flat road at a constant speed of about 30mph. It was in electric mode and in D, the readout said 56mpg while in L it went to 99mpg. No lifting of the accelerator on my part so the question is , is this real or some fluke on the way mpg is calculated.
Did the van eventually start to slow down while in L?

Because when I have shifted into L with foot on the accelerator it seems to create some drag and slows the car down a bit. My guess is that more accelerator would be required to maintain the same speed when in L. Again, the only reason in my mind that the van would act this way is to emulate the way that a gas engine with automatic transmission works.
 

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I'm pretty sure the L mode is using the generator more aggressively, meaning it'll create (more) "drag" and slow down the vehicle whereas D only uses the generator lightly and feels more like coasting. It's the same on our Spark EV. At least on the Spark the L mode is a good bit more "fuel" efficient (maybe around 20%ish), but the driving is a bit less pleasant and it does create a bit more tire wear.
 

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When you switched to "L," you not only see the mileage jump up, you also start slowing down.

From my experiments (numbers and pedal linearity are rough estimates, but the concept is correct)...

In "D," the pedal goes from 0% power to 100% power. So 25% down is ~25% power.
In "L," the pedal goes from, say, -10% power to 100% power. So 20% down is 1/4 of the way from -10 to 100 = 17.5% power.

Personally, I always drive in "L" so I don't have to brake as much. Do note; however, that when you let off the pedal in "L," you are engaging the regenerative brakes without activating the brake light (at least that what happens on my 2018.)
 

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When you switched to "L," you not only see the mileage jump up, you also start slowing down.

From my experiments (numbers and pedal linearity are rough estimates, but the concept is correct)...

In "D," the pedal goes from 0% power to 100% power. So 25% down is ~25% power.
In "L," the pedal goes from, say, -10% power to 100% power. So 20% down is 1/4 of the way from -10 to 100 = 17.5% power.

Personally, I always drive in "L" so I don't have to brake as much. Do note; however, that when you let off the pedal in "L," you are engaging the regenerative brakes without activating the brake light (at least that what happens on my 2018.)
In my opinion, one drawback of driving in “L” all of the time is that it’s even harder to keep the van from engaging regenerative braking. I think that regenerative braking should only be used when you are intentionally trying to slow the van down or stop. Any other ‘accidental’ activation of it seems to reduce efficiency a bit. If I had a choice I would disable even the small amount of regenerative braking that occurs in “D” so that lifting your foot completely off of the accelerator would allow the van to coast without any braking.
 

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Did the van eventually start to slow down while in L?

Because when I have shifted into L with foot on the accelerator it seems to create some drag and slows the car down a bit. My guess is that more accelerator would be required to maintain the same speed when in L. Again, the only reason in my mind that the van would act this way is to emulate the way that a gas engine with automatic transmission works.

L is just regen mode. This would be less confusing to a brand new driver, but for us old things L was a transmission gear and this transmission has only one forward. It would have been nice to use a different letter on the shifter, but R is already used for reverse and the use of L seems a nod to those of us who thought we knew what it meant. I'm one of those who runs in L all the time as I can then use the gas pedal as a speed control--both faster and slower. And putting charge back into the battery seems a good thing and it works nicely for me.
 

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In my Kia Soul EV they used the letter B for more aggressive regenerative Braking. I wish the PacHy did as well to differentiate between Low on a gasser.
 

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L is just regen mode. This would be less confusing to a brand new driver, but for us old things L was a transmission gear and this transmission has only one forward. It would have been nice to use a different letter on the shifter, but R is already used for reverse and the use of L seems a nod to those of us who thought we knew what it meant.
Funny that I think L mode IS an appropriate designation.. and is also a nod to the older generation like you put it!

The design team intended us to use this L mode how and when an ICE vehicle operator would use L mode. This gives us old things the same toolset as drivers that we may have developed over years of driving, even if it is faked.

They didn't need to..

As everyone understands - L in a multi-gear transmission shifts down to a lower gear which increases RPM and thus drive-line drag.. I feel our L mode in the hybrid accomplishes this exactly.

L mode works the same with the exceptions that there is now a benefit for its use and no reason you cant use it at all the time - because its simulated.

Driving around in L mode is an adaptation we as drivers have made because electric cars gave us regen, and we think we’re getting something from it.

However our braking system uses iBooster and the pedal is a sort of regen lever above 10mph and below 50% pedal pressure where no friction brake is actually applied so the jury is out on whether L actually adds any benefit overall.
 

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Taken directly from the user Pacifica user manual :

Hybrid Transmission
The transmission is controlled using a rotary electronic
gear selector located on the center console. The transmission gear selector has PARK, REVERSE, NEUTRAL,
DRIVE, and LOW shift positions. Using the LOW position
will increase the rate of deceleration along with increasing
regeneration of power into the vehicle’s High Voltage (HV)
battery (in comparison to the DRIVE position)
 

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Also from the user manual pages 299-300

LOW (L)
This range should be used when descending very steep
grades. The vehicle transmission can be operated continuously in LOW without damaging the vehicle or causing
issues. Using the LOW position will increase the rate of
deceleration (along with increasing regeneration of power
into the vehicle’s high voltage battery) when the accelerator pedal is released in comparison to the DRIVE position.
 
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