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Just called the dealer near me today. They informed me right off if the van didn't pass they would have to keep it. They told me several people were upset that they couldn't get their van back, so they are telling people first now before they inspect them. They also didn't know what I would get as a loaner or when the real fix would be available. She asked me if I wanted to wait, so I decided to wait for now. After reading the thread it seems even if it passes it doesn't change anything. They still recommend to park it outside, which means I cannot charge it. And we charge ours all the time. We never have to buy gas now unless we go on a vacation.

As for garage smoke alarms, I looked when we got the hybrid and everything I read said that a smoke alarm wouldn't work in a garage due to dust,spider webs, etc. getting into and causing problems with the sensor. But, to instead get a rise over time heat sensor. However, I could never find one that didn't require it to be plugged into an existing system. Does anyone know of a rise over time heat sensor that just runs on batteries that I hang on the ceiling or wall in the garage?
I took mine to get it inspected this morning. They also told me the same thing, that they’d have to keep the van if it failed inspection. I promptly informed them that I am the owner of the van and that I will make the determination on whether it stays with them. They backed down and just said they wouldn’t be liable for anything if I took the van back. They also said that they had already inspected three vans before mine and they all passed inspection.
 

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We have had weather tech mats since day 1. Front and back. That being said. Our twins were born the week after we purchased the van. They throw liquids/things all over. We do live in the north east. Have taken the van to nh in the late fall when there was some snow.
 

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Gotta say, I love this country. Some people want a loaner even though their van passed inspection. Other people want their van even though it failed inspection. Others don’t care or just want to fuss. The only missing piece is that people haven’t asked for cash compensation yet.

I get the impression they are trying to get to an outcome where they aren’t legally responsible if someone’s van burns down an apartment building, but they also aren’t footing the bill for 30,000 rental cars. $1800 a month x 30,000 vans x 3-6 months = a lot of money.
The letter sent to customers regarding recall has left a lot of confusion of if chrysler knows what the issue is, if they know do they have the part, when did they know?, have there been more occurrences. It seems to be a concern for all models from 2017 to 2020, so is it an inherent problem with design and engineering or a small issue related to one part. The problem is the lack of transparency on etiology.

When you sell something and know after the fact that the item you sold has defects with the potential risk of not only severe property damage but also limb and life, you carry the responsibility of making it right. Yes $1800 is a lot of money but so is the cost of a monthly car payment on car that has to be limited in use (dont park in garage, next to somebody, heavens sake dont drink in the car!). So is the anxiety created whenever a family member drives the car.

If the company does not know what item has to be fixed, then offer to keep the car with rental payment till its figured out.

If the company knows what the issue is and does not have the part, let the customer know when it will arrive and provide the ability to track the item so that we can make the decision to hold on to the car or get a loaner.

Yes $1800 per customer is a lot of money. However, We are all required to take responsibility of our vehicles with liability insurance. The company has similar insurance to cover this issue and must use it to make the situation right for its customers and to regain trust in their product. A product that is potentially a revolutionary family mover- as the first plug in.


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Another DP:
Passed inspection
  • live in northeast, though not much snow this year
  • minor spills in the interior - this is inevitable with small kids (a target market for folks buying a minivan).
I do think it is bizarre for a minivan (with families with small kids as a target market) to expect there will not be spills in the interior. Furthermore those of us who live in urban areas (think NYC downtown) could hardly stay 6 ft away as evidenced by the large spike in covid cases earlier this year. How does Chrysler expect to keep the car distanced in such urban areas? Unless you move out to suburbia, you are inevitably in close proximity to others or their property.
 

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I took mine to get it inspected this morning. They also told me the same thing, that they’d have to keep the van if it failed inspection. I promptly informed them that I am the owner of the van and that I will make the determination on whether it stays with them. They backed down and just said they wouldn’t be liable for anything if I took the van back. They also said that they had already inspected three vans before mine and they all passed inspection.
UPDATE: Mine passed inspection. No corrosion. So I didn’t have to throw my weight around on the issue of whether they have the right to keep my van. Never had any spills of any magnitude in the van that I can remember.
 

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2020 Pacifica Hybrid Limited 35th Anniversary, White w/Black and Cranberry
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Hello everyone, Really appreciate all the info on these forums, and so signing up to learn and to share. Just purchased 2020 White Hybrid Limited 35th Anniversary Edition and took delivery on May 23rd... in its short time with us, have really enjoyed not using any gas to run errands and shuttle kids - a new world after living with a Hemi Durango! Love all the crazy electric drive noises, its like driving a space ship - and to others points, yes there are funny unexpected noises from the drivetrain (taps and clicks), but overall, this is a very quiet machine, even in hybrid mode, we can barely hear the ICE... maybe that's improved insulation for 2020? However - boy were we all devastated last week to find out about recall W46. I'd done a fair amount of research pre-purchase, including watching comments on this Forum, and we'd thought that these 'fire/explosion' matters had been rectified by FCA for the 19s and 20s. Clearly not. I was extremely livid last week, and sent a barriage of scathing mails to the dealer and FCA Recall folks, and Chrysler Customer Service, and the result has been - lots of apologies, and kind words - and some action, our Bomb went in for inspection today. Being that it has only 350 miles on it, (my wife and I work from home during Pandemic)... everything was fine. I echo many of the points that other's have shared...The new info that the Service Mgr and Master Tech told me today... A - it might take a good few months for an actual solve... maybe Sept or Oct was a guestimate. As they are sharing/gathering more concrete info across the dealer/FCA network to really come up with the best final resolution. B - The tech also reassured me that he didn't think that liquid could really easily get into these connections, as the rubber sealing is quite strong, and apparently was a bear to get opened up today, even for a brand new vehicle. Not to dump a gallon of liquid inside in the 2nd row, of course, but a reassurance that it would take a lot for liquid to easily seep in. C - He was thinking that maybe there was something not right in the 'materials mix' in the metal of the actual connectors, and maybe that's why they might have the propensity to corrode. Therefore - as other's have said - we'll keep it outside, but we are not fearful of driving it, or charging it, or all piling in, and going to dinner or for errands... We have 'an escape plan' as per for an airplane, or even for our home, just incase... and then, we just hope, Chrysler/FCA sort this out swiftly - but accurately, so we can all put this undo stress and anxiety behind us.
 

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2019 western pa, 13k miles, some spills but weathertech mats from beginning. passed inspection...

The troubling part of all this for me are the inconsistencies with the recall recommendations. It makes sense to inspect the post and if corroded pull the van. But if it passes inspection shouldnt it be good to go until a predetermined repeat inspection or fix while also avoiding spilled liquids.

I dont understand how I can drive my family including 3 (thirsty, but I get that part) kids strapped into rear-facing car seats across the country and with each stop drive around a parking lot trying to park alone and then spend minutes getting them unstrapped and herded out of the car... if a fire is that likely even after a normal inspection should I really be strapping in my kids in the first place? And if I cant really park next to another car even with a normal inspection shouldn’t they just pull all the vans in the first place?

It seems to me after normal inspection they need to decide - either it’s safe enough to function (which obviously includes being parked near other vehicles and in garages) or not — but not leave vans on the road with sweeping corporate CYA recommendations that are impossible to abide by.
 

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In addition to economizing on rental cars, which could be a staggering expense if the grounded the entire fleet, I assume they don’t want to end up repurchasing under the Lemon Law each and every van they sold in the last year or two.

It’s a very distressing situation here because they clearly don’t have complete confidence in the inspections, otherwise they wouldn’t try this CYA guidance. If they would say they had faith in the safety of the van post inspection, at least for the time needed for a permanent fix, that would go a long way, but that is clearly not their view.
 

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I dont understand how I can drive my family including 3 (thirsty, but I get that part) kids strapped into rear-facing car seats across the country and with each stop drive around a parking lot trying to park alone and then spend minutes getting them unstrapped and herded out of the car... if a fire is that likely even after a normal inspection should I really be strapping in my kids in the first place? And if I cant really park next to another car even with a normal inspection shouldn’t they just pull all the vans in the first place?
All you need to accept is that Chrysler doesn’t want to be sued by you or anyone else. If you knowingly expose yourself or others to risk, Chrysler doesn’t want to be the deep-pockets involved. Whether or not a person understands it or whether it effectively protects Chrysler is immaterial to the purpose.
 

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2019 western pa, 13k miles, some spills but weathertech mats from beginning. passed inspection...

The troubling part of all this for me are the inconsistencies with the recall recommendations. It makes sense to inspect the post and if corroded pull the van. But if it passes inspection shouldnt it be good to go until a predetermined repeat inspection or fix while also avoiding spilled liquids.

I dont understand how I can drive my family including 3 (thirsty, but I get that part) kids strapped into rear-facing car seats across the country and with each stop drive around a parking lot trying to park alone and then spend minutes getting them unstrapped and herded out of the car... if a fire is that likely even after a normal inspection should I really be strapping in my kids in the first place? And if I cant really park next to another car even with a normal inspection shouldn’t they just pull all the vans in the first place?

It seems to me after normal inspection they need to decide - either it’s safe enough to function (which obviously includes being parked near other vehicles and in garages) or not — but not leave vans on the road with sweeping corporate CYA recommendations that are impossible to abide by.
It doesn't seem unreasonable to me. It's not like the car will go up like a Molotov cocktail, we're talking overheating of a terminal leading to smoldering of combustible materials nearby, probably accompanied by significant smell and smoke such that you have ample warning to stop and exit the vehicle. Totally different from leaving the vehicle unattended where it can develop undetected for hours.

Given that the recall materials clearly stated that they don't know the cause of the loss of torque on the terminal it's reasonable to not assume the problem will not occur just because you inspected it. Absence of proof is not proof of absence, and all...

I agree the instructions could be a bit more forthcoming on the rationale behind the recommendation to not park inside, etc. But they're in a shitty situation, so I don't think the idea of doing an inspection to find any instances of known problems while continuing to figure out what the final solution will be is unreasonable.
 

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I'm waiting to buy a 2020. The dealer rep emailed me yesterday to say they have one enroute that isn't subject to the recall, and would I be interested? I declined as I don't like the color. Just wanted to share the interesting data point that recently/newly manufactured 2020s apparently aren't subject to this recall.
 

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2019 western pa, 13k miles, some spills but weathertech mats from beginning. passed inspection...

The troubling part of all this for me are the inconsistencies with the recall recommendations. It makes sense to inspect the post and if corroded pull the van. But if it passes inspection shouldnt it be good to go until a predetermined repeat inspection or fix while also avoiding spilled liquids.

I dont understand how I can drive my family including 3 (thirsty, but I get that part) kids strapped into rear-facing car seats across the country and with each stop drive around a parking lot trying to park alone and then spend minutes getting them unstrapped and herded out of the car... if a fire is that likely even after a normal inspection should I really be strapping in my kids in the first place? And if I cant really park next to another car even with a normal inspection shouldn’t they just pull all the vans in the first place?

It seems to me after normal inspection they need to decide - either it’s safe enough to function (which obviously includes being parked near other vehicles and in garages) or not — but not leave vans on the road with sweeping corporate CYA recommendations that are impossible to abide by.
Yeah, I would take that CYA recommendation with a grain of salt. If you passed the inspection there’s little chance that a fire will start due to that problem at least for many, many months.
 

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So has anyone tried to get a full refund for their van over this? I have a 2020 with 3,500 miles on it, so I don't expect a full refund. But to tell me I have to park outside for the indefinite future due to an not-understood fire risk would obviously have been a deal breaker when purchasing. I was warned about Crysler quality, but I didn't think the quality would be an issue this fast.

Also it would be nice to know the risk level here. Is it one in a thousand, one in a million? How many incidents exactly? Did it happen while driving? While parked? While charging or not charging? Immediately after a spill or hitting a big puddle? Seems like they want to CYA without actually providing useful information.
 

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Just wanted to chime in with something that cropped up for me: went in for the inspection last week. On Sunday evening, upon starting, my PacHy had the MIL illuminated. No flashing, just illuminated for the duration of two cycles (downtown and back, about 20 minutes each way). I don't own one of those code reader things, so I called my dealer first thing on Monday morning to report the issue. (When I started up my PacHy to go to the dealer, the MIL was gone.) They got me in an hour later, and the result was that the codes were related to them having disconnected the terminal in the recall inspection the week before. They just cleared the codes and I was good to go. About 10 minutes total at the dealer.

Just thought I would mention it here, because I was a bit concerned and assumed it wasn't related to the recall inspection because of the amount of time that had elapsed. But, because we're using the vehicle so sparingly due to SARS-COV-2, it took until the following Sunday for the code to be thrown. Just an FYI if anyone else here sees that MIL.
 
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2019 western pa, 13k miles, some spills but weathertech mats from beginning. passed inspection...

The troubling part of all this for me are the inconsistencies with the recall recommendations. It makes sense to inspect the post and if corroded pull the van. But if it passes inspection shouldnt it be good to go until a predetermined repeat inspection or fix while also avoiding spilled liquids.
No, FCA has clearly stated "The root cause of this high resistance connection is not known at this time. " and "Remedy is under development at this time. ". They don't know what the problem is or how to fix it.

This inspection is only for data gathering nothing more. Due to the pandemic, I am not taking mine until they have a fix and the replacement parts. This inspection, (not a fix) is not worth the risk of potential viral exposure and does NOT stop the risk of any fire. It is pointless without a fix.

You pass inspection, great nothing has changed to stop the fires from starting. You don't pass the inspection they keep your car for months, disconnect the 12V battery, and let it sit. This could cause a potential rodent problem from sitting or lot rot problems with the HV battery months after getting it back. If this happens you will be waiting again to have that replaced all while continuing to make payments on a car you have not been able to use for months.

Regardless if this is or is not the cause of the fires, from an engineering perspective, this 12-volt isolator post is a stupid design. The post, (12-volt positive) pressed into the body (12-volt Negative)? Who designed this? More connections between point A to point B have the potential to cause more resistance. If that isolator post gets hot and over time melts or damages the insulation around it, it will short out directly against the body and causes an uncontrolled fire spreading up the dual cable into the HV battery. This should have had a direct dual cable running from the 12-volt battery straight down from the battery, UNDER the vehicle running forward. Not a single cable running inside to an isolator post bolted and on the underside to a dual cable bolted. Dual cables, to a post, to a single cable is potentially bottlenecking the current flow. Throw corrosion into the mix and it can increase resistance even more. I think the corrosion is caused by the post getting hot and cooling down repeatedly due to the metal composition and has nothing to do with liquids.
 

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Just wanted to chime in with something that cropped up for me: went in for the inspection last week. On Sunday evening, upon starting, my PacHy had the MIL illuminated. No flashing, just illuminated for the duration of two cycles (downtown and back, about 20 minutes each way). I don't own one of those code reader things, so I called my dealer first thing on Monday morning to report the issue. (When I started up my PacHy to go to the dealer, the MIL was gone.) They got me in an hour later, and the result was that the codes were related to them having disconnected the terminal in the recall inspection the week before. They just cleared the codes and I was good to go. About 10 minutes total at the dealer.

Just thought I would mention it here, because I was a bit concerned and assumed it wasn't related to the recall inspection because of the amount of time that had elapsed. But, because we're using the vehicle so sparingly due to SARS-COV-2, it took until the following Sunday for the code to be thrown. Just an FYI if anyone else here sees that MIL.
They didn't follow the inspection procedures properly. It clearly tells them to clear the codes after reconnecting power. Their lack of following instructions wasted your time and put you at risk. What other instructions did they not follow with your inspection?
 

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So has anyone tried to get a full refund for their van over this? I have a 2020 with 3,500 miles on it, so I don't expect a full refund. But to tell me I have to park outside for the indefinite future due to an not-understood fire risk would obviously have been a deal breaker when purchasing. I was warned about Crysler quality, but I didn't think the quality would be an issue this fast.

Also it would be nice to know the risk level here. Is it one in a thousand, one in a million? How many incidents exactly? Did it happen while driving? While parked? While charging or not charging? Immediately after a spill or hitting a big puddle? Seems like they want to CYA without actually providing useful information.
They are close to cross the 30,000 mark on hybrid production. There is no way of knowing the unreported fire numbers unless you are FCA.
 

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They didn't follow the inspection procedures properly. It clearly tells them to clear the codes after reconnecting power. Their lack of following instructions wasted your time and put you at risk. What other instructions did they not follow with your inspection?
I guess, you're right, TSE, I hadn't thought through enough to see that it was an error on their end. I'll mention it in my review of the visit. I wasn't that put out by it but, as you say, if they were instructed to do so, they should have.

The only other thing I'm aware of is that they didn't "clear" the recall inspection attached to my VIN. The service manager's reasoning was that it might make it more difficult down the road to reopen the recall issue if/when FCA identifies a part to be replaced and my recall issue is "closed". Upon reflection, however, I'm thinking that I don't like the potential liability that might be attached to me in the case something were to happen related to this recall. As my VIN still shows the vehicle needing the inspection, would I somehow be at fault because according to "the system" I hadn't gone in as instructed by FCA?
 
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