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Oh man good luck to these people, but this isn’t going to happen at any scale. Just another flying car.
I would not get in one of those things if it was going to fly. On the ground, yes.
 

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That all depends on charging speed. If it can take over 150kW on a DC Fast Charge your charging time will be minimal. Certainly less than several hours a day. Depending on pack size and all that, and sufficiently fast DC charging stations, I bet maybe 2 30-40 minute charge sessions will get you through a day of travel, unless you're going all night. Then you charge it overnight at your hotel before the next day.
This is completely false from even a theoretical standpoint let alone a real world one in regards to long distance trips. I can tell you don't have any experience with a BEV (battery electric vehicle). My daily driver is an Audi e-tron which has a 150kW charging speed, one of the fastest charging EV's on the market for max charging speed and consistent charging speed. Most EV's taper off significantly through their charging curve. The e-tron's curve is incredibly flat. And most EV's cannot charge as fast as 150kW.

As an illustration, the 862-mile trip I do in a day to visit my in-laws, the website abetterrouteplanner.com calculates 2 hours and 51 minutes simply for charging in my e-tron. As awesome as this website is, plotting the fastest route to get you to your destination, even calculating at what percentage to charge your EV to maximize it's charging curve, it is still "theoretical," meaning the reality is the negotiation with chargers is often not even close to the expected charging speed. I've seen 112kW and 84kW as max charging speeds at 150kW chargers in my e-tron. This is just the nature of DC fast charging. It often does not work "as it is suppose to." So the real world charging time in this example would be 3-4 hours, if everything goes well.

Not to mention, DC fast chargers are not always directly on your route like a gas station at every corner. Sometimes you have to drive 3, 5, or 12 miles out of your way just to get to a DC fast charger, or you have to alter your route by 20 or 30 miles so you can hit the 150kW charger instead of using a 50kW charger. So you factor all that in, adding time to have to charge an EV vs. filling up an ICE vehicle (with gas stations at every corner), you are adding "several hours a day" to your long-distance trip as I stated previously. Then you factor in the distinct possibility that the only charging spot you counted on is down (it happens), you will really be in a world of hurt if there are no other DC options nearby and you have to seek out a level 2 charger to give you enough juice to make it to a level 3 charger.

On a 525-mile trip I actually took with my e-tron, it was calculated at 2 hours 20 minutes for charging, in part because I had to use a 50kW DC charger (there were no faster options on part of the route). Actual charing time was 3 hours, because I had issues with one of the charging locations, turning an 8 hour trip that I have made in an ICE vehicle into an 11 hour trip. So that is a real world example for you. That is "hours added to your trip," and is in no definition of the word "minimal."

Remember when you're DC charging, going over 80% is often a waste of time.
Going over 80% is often necessary to make it to the next charger. And, you don't want to plan to arrive at your next charger with 5% battery. If you hit a strong headwind, it will decrease your range significantly, and you will very likely run out of juice if you cut margins that close. So you bring up a good point, with most EV's, once you get to 80%, even 70% for many Teslas and others, the charging speed is literally halved or worse when trying to charge the batteries to their highest capacity. Again, this will take even longer, and add more time to your trip.

The simple truth is this: charging in a BEV vs an ICE vehicle adds considerable time to your long-distance trip. Not minimal. Not minutes. Think in terms of hours each day.
 

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This is completely false from even a theoretical standpoint let alone a real world one in regards to long distance trips. I can tell you don't have any experience with a BEV (battery electric vehicle). My daily driver is an Audi e-tron which has a 150kW charging speed, one of the fastest charging EV's on the market for max charging speed and consistent charging speed. Most EV's taper off significantly through their charging curve. The e-tron's curve is incredibly flat. And most EV's cannot charge as fast as 150kW.

As an illustration, the 862-mile trip I do in a day to visit my in-laws, the website abetterrouteplanner.com calculates 2 hours and 51 minutes simply for charging in my e-tron. As awesome as this website is, plotting the fastest route to get you to your destination, even calculating at what percentage to charge your EV to maximize it's charging curve, it is still "theoretical," meaning the reality is the negotiation with chargers is often not even close to the expected charging speed. I've seen 112kW and 84kW as max charging speeds at 150kW chargers in my e-tron. This is just the nature of DC fast charging. It often does not work "as it is suppose to." So the real world charging time in this example would be 3-4 hours, if everything goes well.

Not to mention, DC fast chargers are not always directly on your route like a gas station at every corner. Sometimes you have to drive 3, 5, or 12 miles out of your way just to get to a DC fast charger, or you have to alter your route by 20 or 30 miles so you can hit the 150kW charger instead of using a 50kW charger. So you factor all that in, adding time to have to charge an EV vs. filling up an ICE vehicle (with gas stations at every corner), you are adding "several hours a day" to your long-distance trip as I stated previously. Then you factor in the distinct possibility that the only charging spot you counted on is down (it happens), you will really be in a world of hurt if there are no other DC options nearby and you have to seek out a level 2 charger to give you enough juice to make it to a level 3 charger.

On a 525-mile trip I actually took with my e-tron, it was calculated at 2 hours 20 minutes for charging, in part because I had to use a 50kW DC charger (there were no faster options on part of the route). Actual charing time was 3 hours, because I had issues with one of the charging locations, turning an 8 hour trip that I have made in an ICE vehicle into an 11 hour trip. So that is a real world example for you. That is "hours added to your trip," and is in no definition of the word "minimal."

Going over 80% is often necessary to make it to the next charger. And, you don't want to plan to arrive at your next charger with 5% battery. If you hit a strong headwind, it will decrease your range significantly, and you will very likely run out of juice if you cut margins that close. So you bring up a good point, with most EV's, once you get to 80%, even 70% for many Teslas and others, the charging speed is literally halved or worse when trying to charge the batteries to their highest capacity. Again, this will take even longer, and add more time to your trip.

The simple truth is this: charging in a BEV vs an ICE vehicle adds considerable time to your long-distance trip. Not minimal. Not minutes. Think in terms of hours each day.
This is all fine but over 800 miles in one shot is something I don’t think most people want to do, or would do. Over that distance your charging time isn’t surprising, but that’s a very extreme example. I used to do 1000km in one day pretty regularly and it was awful. Again as DC infrastructure gets better this will be mitigated. And fast sustained charging will get better as BEVs and batteries improve.
 

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Disney World trips I usually drive around 900 miles on the first leg and finish out the second 477 miles to not arrive exhausted and begin enjoying things immediately. I could split it in half, but that would make the arrival day and drive time suck. The only stops are for hotels coming and going and petrol. Average petrol stops are about 10 to 15 minutes at around 400 miles. I like to get from point A to point B as quickly as possible. I am not a fan of spending extra hours sitting in a vehicle more than necessary.

For me, it will be hybrids until manufactures cross the thresholds which I have previously stated.

Currently, most BEVs are a premium price but an inconvenience for traveling long distances.
 

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Disney World trips I usually drive around 900 miles on the first leg and finish out the second 477 miles to not arrive exhausted and begin enjoying things immediately. I could split it in half, but that would make the arrival day and drive time suck. The only stops are for hotels coming and going and petrol. Average petrol stops are about 10 to 15 minutes at around 400 miles. I like to get from point A to point B as quickly as possible. I am not a fan of spending extra hours sitting in a vehicle more than necessary.

For me, it will be hybrids until manufactures cross the thresholds which I have previously stated.
Assuming they remain available and financially viable.
 

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This is all fine but over 800 miles in one shot is something I don’t think most people want to do, or would do. Over that distance your charging time isn’t surprising, but that’s a very extreme example. I used to do 1000km in one day pretty regularly and it was awful.
It's all interstate driving and takes 12-13 hours with stops, depending on how long we make our stops. We have broken it up in two days, but by the time you stop, pay for hotel, spend 9+ hours at that hotel, getting a poor night's sleep, then waste a good part of a second day, it is better and even easier to get up early on departure day and just do it in one day. Or, break it up over 2 days, you'll still need to spend time on your charging stops, which would only be shorted a little if you find a hotel with an EV charger AND that EV charger happens to be available for your use (someone else may beat you to it, so you can't count on it being available.)

Now take an even longer trip of over 1,000 miles by vehicle, you'll just add that much more time that will be required to charge, 5+ hours. The longer the trip, the more time wasted charging.
Again as DC infrastructure gets better this will be mitigated. And fast sustained charging will get better as BEVs and batteries improve.
DC infrastructure will never be like the gas station infrastructure is today, so don't kid yourself that we just need a little infrastructure improvement and EV driving will be worry-free. And there are limits to fast sustained charging. 50kW and under DC chargers are pretty reliable. 100kW+ chargers are not nearly as reliable and even though they work, you may get half the rated speed, meaning double the charging time required. Swing on over to plugshare.com and have a look at some of the DC charing locations in the USA and user reports and you'll understand what I mean. It's a constant complaint on user forums. So will it improve from where it is today? Most certainly. Will it ever be as seamless as filling a vehicle with gas in 5 minutes and driving off? Not even close. Even with infrastructure improvements and incremental increases in battery and charging technology, you'll STILL be spending hours charging on a long trip in the next decade and beyond.
The only way I will ever go full electric is the vehicle must have 600+ miles of range and fully charge in 20 minutes or less. If they can't do that, I will never own one.
@ThisSuckersElectrical, sorry bro, you will never, ever own a full BEV. 🙁🤣

That said, if you plan the charging stops into your trip, and don't mind them, it's not that you CAN'T take a long trip/vacation in a BEV. That 500 mile trip I referenced previously I took solo, which required 3 hours of charging, I was surprised at how refreshed I was after being on the road for 11 hours. Resting in my vehicle while it was charging made a world of difference, not to mention the e-tron is an extremely comfortable vehicle. I would LIKE to take a long trip in my e-tron ... my wife can't stand to take an extra 2-3 hours just to sit and charge. I've even told her many of the charging locations she can go shopping. 😀

Oh, and another point, winter/cold weather driving. One thing I'm learning is that winter weather, below freezing, easily decreases your range by about 40%. That's pretty drastic. It is a combination of vehicle heaters, which take an incredible amount of energy, along with decrease in performance from the batteries being so cold. Since over 95% of EV charging is done at home or work while the vehicle sits, its not an issue for most people who drive their EV close to their home. Traveling long-distance by EV during the winter months will add even that much more time spent charging since you are burning the energy in the cells that much quicker.
 
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