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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Posting this here in case it helps anyone else out. But I also want to check whether I was ripped off. We have an extended warranty but are required to take the car to our non-preferred mechanic.

Our CEL came on with the P0305 code that cylinder 5 was misfiring. The mechanic wanted to change out two bad ignition coils and replace all spark plugs. In addition they recommended a fuel induction service to clean out the engine. I figured at 74,000 miles that wouldn't be a bad idea. Here was the cost:

DIAG $145
Ignition coils - Parts $170, Labor $319
Spark plugs - Parts $155.94, Labor $145
Fuel Induction service - Parts - $90 (fuel system cleaner), Labor $99

Total parts and labor was $1337. Thankfully warranty covered $471 of it. But that seems awfully high.
 

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Interesting because in order to change out the plugs you have to get at the coil packs anyway . So cool pack removal is easy and plug removal and gap isn’t that hard , did you ask for the old plugs and coil packs back ? I’d say moving forward you can buy parts yourself online and take it to reputable mechanic and save yourself some chunk of change .
 

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$26 for a sparkplug? Wow. I would ask to see one, they ought to be awesome...
In situations like that, I ask to see a gun. When they ask why, I say, "Well, if I am going to be robbed, I'd at least like to see a gun". Sure seems exorbitant to me.
 

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Model Year:
2018
Gas / Hybrid:
gas
Trim:
Touring L Plus
Just hope you do not have the issue seen in this thread. At 70,000 miles Dealer says new engine One of the first signs that the head gasket is gone, or engine block might be cracked is the code P030X indicating a misfire in cylinder X.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just hope you do not have the issue seen in this thread. At 70,000 miles Dealer says new engine One of the first signs that the head gasket is gone, or engine block might be cracked is the code P030X indicating a misfire in cylinder X.
Yes, I've seen various posts about this. My coolent reservoir was also empty but I had no evidence of a leak. I'm very concerned that this is related to what others are complaining about. Very happy we got the extended warranty to 125K miles. Put in a new engine as long as someone else pays for it! Or maybe they'll just buy the car from me. Honestly, over the past two years of ownership we've had other issues that combined aren't major but for a relatively young car make me worried. Thinking of just trading it in.
 

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2017 Limited
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I was able to get genuine Mopar ignition coils at my local Advance Auto for $36 each. (I believe the brand on the box was "Standard", so I was surprised when they seemed to OEM parts). Original on the right, replacement on the left. It's too late to help you, but if anybody else needs to replace their coils, you can save a lot of money that way.

Also, it's a shame they went through the trouble of replacing the front spark plugs without changing out the coils while they had the manifold off. It seems to be a pretty common failure. I had two fail within about a month of each other. Luckily for me, mine were both on the rear bank of cylinders (#1 and then #5) so I could change them myself without much trouble. I went ahead and bought replacements for the three front packs, and when one fails I'll replace all three.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was able to get genuine Mopar ignition coils at my local Advance Auto for $36 each. (I believe the brand on the box was "Standard", so I was surprised when they seemed to OEM parts). Original on the right, replacement on the left. It's too late to help you, but if anybody else needs to replace their coils, you can save a lot of money that way.

Also, it's a shame they went through the trouble of replacing the rear spark plugs without changing out the coils while they had the manifold off. It seems to be a pretty common failure. I had two fail within about a month of each other. Luckily for me, mine were both on the front bank of cylinders so I could change them myself without much trouble. I went ahead and bought replacements for the three rear packs, and when one fails I'll replace all three.

View attachment 51141
Thanks, yes it's a shame and I didn't think about how involved it was to change these. At least they did all of the plugs.
 

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Posting this here in case it helps anyone else out. But I also want to check whether I was ripped off. We have an extended warranty but are required to take the car to our non-preferred mechanic.

Our CEL came on with the P0305 code that cylinder 5 was misfiring. The mechanic wanted to change out two bad ignition coils and replace all spark plugs. In addition they recommended a fuel induction service to clean out the engine. I figured at 74,000 miles that wouldn't be a bad idea. Here was the cost:

DIAG $145
Ignition coils - Parts $170, Labor $319
Spark plugs - Parts $155.94, Labor $145
Fuel Induction service - Parts - $90 (fuel system cleaner), Labor $99

Total parts and labor was $1337. Thankfully warranty covered $471 of it. But that seems awfully high.
My engine light is on and it reads Code P0303 Cylinder 3 Misfire. Drives rough so I parked it til I can find a mechanic to fix it. Dealer ship cannot even look at it for 2 weeks. Guess I'll try having the same thing done from a friend I know instead of taking it to the dealer ship.
 

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2017 Limited
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My engine light is on and it reads Code P0303 Cylinder 3 Misfire. Drives rough so I parked it til I can find a mechanic to fix it. Dealer ship cannot even look at it for 2 weeks. Guess I'll try having the same thing done from a friend I know instead of taking it to the dealer ship.

You're lucky, cylinders 1,3, and 5 are the ones not covered by the intake manifold, so it's not necessary to remove it. It's the rear bank of cylinders (closest to the firewall) all the way on the right (towards the driver side) when you're standing in front of the engine.

EDIT: Sorry, cylinder 3 is the middle cylinder. I had a brain fart because the one I replaced on my car was 5...all the way on the right.

It's not too challenging to replace it yourself. You have to remove some miscellaneous stuff out of the way, but nothing too drastic. At the time, I found a YouTube video that helped me. I'll see if I can find it again.

Here's the video I used:


And here's another one that may be useful:


In both the videos, the mechanic is removing the intake manifold to access all the cylinders, but you can ignore those parts if you want and just follow along for the rears.
 

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Posting this here in case it helps anyone else out. But I also want to check whether I was ripped off. We have an extended warranty but are required to take the car to our non-preferred mechanic.

Our CEL came on with the P0305 code that cylinder 5 was misfiring. The mechanic wanted to change out two bad ignition coils and replace all spark plugs. In addition they recommended a fuel induction service to clean out the engine. I figured at 74,000 miles that wouldn't be a bad idea. Here was the cost:

DIAG $145
Ignition coils - Parts $170, Labor $319
Spark plugs - Parts $155.94, Labor $145
Fuel Induction service - Parts - $90 (fuel system cleaner), Labor $99

Total parts and labor was $1337. Thankfully warranty covered $471 of it. But that seems awfully high.
We had a similar problem just days after purchasing the van. Ours was a cylinder 6 misfire. The dealer went through the same steps as yours over about 4 weeks but fixed nothing. The dealer ended up working with Chrysler s/w engineers and finally fixed it with a software update. Something to look into, maybe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Update: Two weeks after this $800+ repair the exact same engine code came on from the exact same cylinder. I am also still losing coolent. I took it to the same mechanic because it's the only shop covered by our Maxcare warranty. It's been there for 3 days and still no word on what's going on. Hopefully it doesn't require a new engine.
 

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My engine light is on and it reads Code P0303 Cylinder 3 Misfire. Drives rough so I parked it til I can find a mechanic to fix it. Dealer ship cannot even look at it for 2 weeks. Guess I'll try having the same thing done from a friend I know instead of taking it to the dealer ship.
Update: Two weeks after this $800+ repair the exact same engine code came on from the exact same cylinder. I am also still losing coolent. I took it to the same mechanic because it's the only shop covered by our Maxcare warranty. It's been there for 3 days and still no word on what's going on. Hopefully it doesn't require a new engine.

Hello to you both!

For anyone else experience these concerns as well, know we are here to help. Please send us a private message with your VIN and mileage to start a conversation with our team! We are more than willing to review your vehicle information and work alongside your dealer.

Hannah
Chrysler Cares
 

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Well, we had a third coil pack die late last night on my wife's 2017 Limited while still about 30 miles from home.

It started out subtly, while we were on the interstate. The ride felt a bit bumpy at times, and at first I thought there was some kind of surface issue with the pavement in the area. But then I noticed that the "bumpiness" only occurred when I was pressing the accelerator. As we got closer to home, the roughness under acceleration became more pronounced and the check engine light started flashing intermittently and sometimes there would be an audible warning ding.

When we got home, I hooked up my OBD-II scanner dongle and pulled the codes. It showed code P0306, a misfire on cylinder 6,

Rectangle Font Screenshot Software Number


It looked like I was finally out of luck since cylinder 6 is one of the cylinders hidden under the intake manifold. My two prior ignition pack failures were on cylinders 1 and then 5, which are accessible without removing the intake. Replacing those ignition packs only takes a few minutes, but removing the intake to reach the other cylinders is a bit of an ordeal.

I kind of knew this day was coming, since the two earlier failures had been within a short time of each other (somewhere in the 70,000 mile range). At over 90,000 miles I figured I was running on borrowed time, so I already had four new ignition coil packs on hand, as well as four new iridium spark plugs (I already replaced the spark plugs on cylinders 1 and 5 when I replaced the packs).

Unfortunately the timing was not ideal, since my wife was starting a new job in the morning. I started at around 11:30 last night, and finished up around 4:00 this morning. Not counting test driving the van and putting my tools away, the job probably took 3.5 to 4 hours, including time spent watching YouTube videos for reference, lol. I used the two videos I linked earlier in the thread. Here it is with the manifold off:
Hood Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive exterior Vehicle

Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design City Auto part

The YouTube videos definitely helped, but they glossed over some of the parts I found trickier as an amateur mechanic, such as how to unlock and disconnect the various electrical connectors without breaking them.

Everything went pretty smoothly, except that when I thought I had removed and unbolted everything, I still couldn't pull the manifold completely off because it was hung up somewhere down and on the right. It seemed like there was still a bolt attached, but I couldn't find it. I finally found the following illustration, which showed me the bolt I had missed. It's the bolt labeled "2". It's pretty much impossible to see hidden behind the two big electrical plugs down on the bottom right side of the engine.
Motor vehicle Font Auto part Engineering Automotive lighting

Here's the thread where I found that diagram, which has other useful information for the process:


And here's how my spark plugs looked after 90,000 miles:
Spark plug Household hardware Amber Auto part Metal

I replaced the original Champion Iridium RER8ZWYCB4 plugs with Denso SXU22HCR11S 3461 iridium plugs.

Yeah, it was a bit of a pain doing the repair myself, but I think that anybody who is decently mechanically apt should be able to do it. If I had to do it again it would go much quicker. I imagine a real mechanic would be able to complete the job in under two hours. But I feel good about saving several hundred dollars, and being able to get my wife's van fixed overnight instead of waiting for a repair shop to fit it in.
 

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2018 Pacifica Touring L+
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The YouTube videos definitely helped, but they glossed over some of the parts I found trickier as an amateur mechanic, such as how to unlock and disconnect the various electrical connectors without breaking them.
Hi Edgar. Thank you so much for your very informative post. I find those darn electrical connectors daunting. Some guys end up using brute force and, well, we all know what happens then. So, if you don't mind, and if you remember, can you please share some tips on how to disconnect the tricky ones? For example, do some have a sliding clip while others have a certain sequence of actions before they can be separated?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Not sure what to do now, mechanic has been sitting on my car for 12 days! I've called repeatedly and they say they're backlogged. This morning had another phone call and said he has to do a road test and that the last repair (where they replaced two of the coils) they recommended replacing all of the coils. Would other coils cause a misfire in only one cylinder? I'm about to just take the car back home and try another shop or the dealer.
 

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Not sure what to do now, mechanic has been sitting on my car for 12 days! I've called repeatedly and they say they're backlogged. This morning had another phone call and said he has to do a road test and that the last repair (where they replaced two of the coils) they recommended replacing all of the coils. Would other coils cause a misfire in only one cylinder? I'm about to just take the car back home and try another shop or the dealer.
So I've had three ignition packs fail at different times, and each time I received a code for a misfire on the effected cylinder. So when the pack on cylinder 1 died, I got a code for misfire on cylinder 1. Same for cylinders 5 and then 6. I also experienced identical symptoms each time: Running rough, especially under acceleration, check engine light flashing, and an occasional ding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So I've had three ignition packs fail at different times, and each time I received a code for a misfire on the effected cylinder. So when the pack on cylinder 1 died, I got a code for misfire on cylinder 1. Same for cylinders 5 and then 6. I also experienced identical symptoms each time: Running rough, especially under acceleration, check engine light flashing, and an occasional ding.
Thanks Edgar, based on your experience then would it make sense to just replace the remaining ignition coils?
 

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Thanks Edgar, based on your experience then would it make sense to just replace the remaining ignition coils?
That what I ended up doing. Especially if you will be removing the intake anyway to get to #2, #4, or #6.

Three of mine failed at between 70,000 and 92,000 miles. I'm not sure if that's typical, or if my van just got a bad batch of packs when it was built, but I had no faith in the remaining packs. I was afraid that the next one would fail at a very inconvenient time. In fact when we took a family trip a couple states away a few months ago, I brought an extra ignition pack and my toolbox along just in case.

Since I was able to find genuine Mopar packs at Advance Auto packaged in "Standard" brand boxes for ~$35 each (see higher up in the thread), I went ahead and bought enough packs to change them all. I don't know if they're still selling repackaged Mopar packs at that price, but I jumped on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Update:

Car shop did some extensive testing. When they went to check out the car the code disappeared. They couldn't get the code back on. They did fuel pressure testing while driving, they took apart the intake manifold and looked at the plugs and coils for any signs of coolant leaking and didn't see any. They rearranged a few of the coils and the suggestion will be to continue to put some miles on the car and see if the code comes back on and whether or not the same cylinder code is shown or it moves with a bad coil.

Thanks to Edgar I actually think I could do this work myself next time it happens. Looks like taking the manifold apart is the hardest part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I wanted to post a follow up. Because this previous shop did "extensive testing" we thought we were in the clear. We still threw an engine misfire code but it quickly went away. We were having rough start ups but only intermittently. This past two weeks our car has started weirdly overheating. Like temp gauge would go up based on speed and we would periodically lose heat. Instead of taking it to this shop, that last sat on my car for two weeks, I took it to my trusty neighborhood mechanic who quickly diagnosed that there is coolant in cylinder 5 and we have a cracked head gasket. Why this previous shop couldn't diagnose that is beyond me. I feel like I've been taken advantage of and completely lied to. Thankfully I have an extended warranty so hopefully they will cover it. Otherwise I'm going to the dealer and demanding they give me a new engine.
 
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