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Discussion Starter #1
Something in me just rebels when I contemplate purchasing a $1200 four corner portable hydraulic lift. Especially when I only want to be able to rotate tires and change oil and filter.

Tools: standard low profile 3 ton floor jack, four big concrete blocks, four small concrete bricks, impact wrench, socket, torque wrench

Pic 1: jack up the front using the pinchwelds on both sides and a pinchweld adaptor like this.

Pic 2: support the front using a concrete block and a concrete brick under the lower control arms.

Pic 3: jack up the rear using the jack pad directly underneath the spring perch.

Pic 4: support the rear using a concrete block and a concrete brick under the trailing arms. (I tried other methods, but only this prevents the rear wheel from coming too far down when the jack is released.)

This is necessary to rotate the tires, but oil changes only require the front end to be lifted.
 

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Can you recommend a pinch weld adapter? I bought a plastic looking one, but it makes me nervous by the amount that it distorts shape under load. I was thinking of buying a magnetic metal one, but look like all weight gets put on two metal fins on each side of the weld.
 

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The blocks don't look terribly stable. A pair of jack stands should be safer.
The pinch welds in the jacking points are reinforced. They don't need adapters.
I just put a 12 inch long 2x4 on top of my jack which provides a slightly ‘softer’ mating between the pinch weld and the jack although I agree that you could probably jack it directly on the pinch weld without problem.
 

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If you have a hockey puck sitting around, cutting about a 1/4 inch wide slit in that and putting it on your jack (aligning the slit with the pinch weld) also works well and is fairly cheap...

Again, not so much for strength as others as mentioned, but more for keeping the pinch welds looking pretty and not crushing / deforming them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wish they had put a lift point right on the C of G. Then the whole car would go up evenly on the jack. I had a Citroen DS-21 that went up like that (by itself) then you put a little stand on a C of G support point and lowered the car down on to it.

I need to get some shorter jack stands. My Walker five tons are too tall for this car.
 

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I had a Citroen DS-21 that went up like that (by itself)
I didn't know those Citroens were sold in US.





I just put a 12 inch long 2x4 on top of my jack which provides a slightly ‘softer’ mating between the pinch weld and the jack although I agree that you could probably jack it directly on the pinch weld without problem.
Where did you had your jack to get the stand under the jacking point?

I put a short 2x4 on top of my jack because it was too low, but it was in parallel the chassis. The weight of the van spit it along the grain. A lesson learned.
 

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I didn't know those Citroens were sold in US.






Where did you had your jack to get the stand under the jacking point?

I put a short 2x4 on top of my jack because it was too low, but it was in parallel the chassis. The weight of the van spit it along the grain. A lesson learned.
There are two jacking points on each side. As I recall, I think I jacked the front up and was able to get both tires off the ground and then I just slid my jack stand under the rear jack point.
 

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The blocks don't look terribly stable. A pair of jack stands should be safer.
The pinch welds in the jacking points are reinforced. They don't need adapters.
^^^This^^^

It's OP's body and OP's car and they can do what they want. But you would not catch me doing this or recommending this to anyone.

At a minimum use some proper stands - one wrong shove and those bricks could roll over. If that were to happen the momentum associated with the vehicle shifting could easily topple or explode the cinder blocks too.

In addition, hollow cinder blocks are designed for distributed or reinforced loads, not point loads, and can shatter without warning if there's a weakness in the block or the block simply can't take it any more. That's when using them in the proper orientation with blocks laid horizontally and hollow channels oriented vertically. They're turned on their sides in the photo, where the strength associated with the block's design is far reduced.

Please be safe out there when DIY'ing.
 

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^^^This^^^

It's OP's body and OP's car and they can do what they want. But you would not catch me doing this or recommending this to anyone.

At a minimum use some proper stands - one wrong shove and those bricks could roll over. If that were to happen the momentum associated with the vehicle shifting could easily topple or explode the cinder blocks too.

In addition, hollow cinder blocks are designed for distributed or reinforced loads, not point loads, and can shatter without warning if there's a weakness in the block or the block simply can't take it any more. That's when using them in the proper orientation with blocks laid horizontally and hollow channels oriented vertically. They're turned on their sides in the photo, where the strength associated with the block's design is far reduced.

Please be safe out there when DIY'ing.
Thank you for saying this. It's what I was thinking, but didn't have the words to express.
 

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As previously noted , the hockey puck does the trick and the cost is so minimal . On a side note, the jack points really do not require any external pieces of wood or material as they will not bend or get damaged if done correctly.
 

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^^^This^^^

It's OP's body and OP's car and they can do what they want. But you would not catch me doing this or recommending this to anyone.

At a minimum use some proper stands - one wrong shove and those bricks could roll over. If that were to happen the momentum associated with the vehicle shifting could easily topple or explode the cinder blocks too.

In addition, hollow cinder blocks are designed for distributed or reinforced loads, not point loads, and can shatter without warning if there's a weakness in the block or the block simply can't take it any more. That's when using them in the proper orientation with blocks laid horizontally and hollow channels oriented vertically. They're turned on their sides in the photo, where the strength associated with the block's design is far reduced.

Please be safe out there when DIY'ing.

+ 1000 on this!

1964Plymouth, not to give you a hard time, but you really should edit the first post advising others not to use concrete (or worse, old cinder) blocks. I'd hate for someone to just see your first post and think they were good to try the same.

You at least had the weight over the completely solid part, but I've actually seen someone use the block in the other orientation (my friend, many years ago) and it cracked/crumbled. Fortunately he wasn't trying to get under the car, just trying to get it high enough to change the tire.

People do get killed working under their cars. A few years back I read on another forum about a young man being crushed under his honda/accura when whatever he had holding it up gave out.

Good jack stands are relatively cheap when you think about the risk involved.
 
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