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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve read the forums, but am still unclear whether getting the hybrid is worth the extra money? Can anyone confirm?

Also, I’m still confused as to how this hybrid works. What are the MPG after the 30 miles of electric runs out?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Welcome to the forum.

The "extra money" question depends on your driving style or habits. If you mostly do short runs for errands near your home, you will burn less gasoline. For longer trips, because of different tires and brake regeneration, you may get a couple of mpg better economy. With the hybrid you get a quieter smoother ride, more comfortable (particularly for adults) 2nd row seats, fewer gas pump stops, and perhaps bragging rights on saving the planet. You will lose those magic disappearing 2nd row Stow n Go seats and the option to use the storage space they occupy when folded.

Now for my 2 cents. Because you have to ask the question, I surmise you are not a dedicated eco advocate. Reading the problem reports in this forum suggests that the hybrid Pacifica has more issues than the gas version. This has not been actually quantified and documented, so it may not be a fact. Do you have tolerance for something quite different? Are you willing to risk the possibility that in five years something much better will make your hybrid obsolete and less valuable?
 

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I’ve read the forums, but am still unclear whether getting the hybrid is worth the extra money? Can anyone confirm?

Also, I’m still confused as to how this hybrid works. What are the MPG after the 30 miles of electric runs out?

Thanks in advance!
@Waldo already gave you some good items to consider in his reply. Replying specifically to your question about gas mileage, the EPA predicts that, after the 30 (or more or less, depending on your driving habits and ambient temperature) miles of EV range are exhausted, you'll see 32 MPG combined, which is 10 MPG better than the combined MPG for the non-hybrid. As Waldo said, if you use the car mainly for short trips, you could realize thousands of dollars per year in fuel savings. If your combined miles lean more toward long-haul trips, you will still see meaningful savings, but any cost premium of the hybrid will be recouped over a longer time horizon. Bear in mind that the available $7500 tax credit could bring the hybrid closer to the non-hybrid purchase price, further reducing the time before you're "in the black" on the cost comparison and every dollar saved on gas is a dollar saved overall.

As for reliability issues restricted to the hybrid, my thinking (in recently ordering one) is that the battery technology has remained relatively consistent over the 3+ years since this car first rolled off the assembly line, meaning that many of the previous issues will have been ironed out. Separately, if Waymo and now Lyft are making significant investments in the Pacifica Hybrid, it means that their cost-benefit analyses have demonstrated that any reliability issues aren't significant enough to opt for another vehicle for their fleets.

My two cents.
 

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I’m stopping at the gas station every 5-6 weeks now, averaging 76 MPG. I haven’t noticed much change in my electric bill. That’s why I bought a hybrid. Over its life, my Town and Country consumed $21k in fuel. That’s 10 years. I’ll spend a quarter or less of that on fuel with the hybrid. Between that, the good deal I got, and the $7,500 tax credit, it was a no-brainer. My total cost of ownership will be significantly lower.

I do miss the Stow’n’Go, but that’s a compromise I was willing to make. It’s the only compromise for me.

The unexpected upside is the way it drives. It’s so incredibly smooth and quiet. I don’t think I’ll ever buy a non-electric again. It’s just too much of a difference. I had no idea how much value this would have for me, and it’s been a very pleasant thing to experience. My wife, who’s a bit pickier about style than I am, is envious. Her 2016 Edge Sport is faster and has more power, but now she wants an electric, too.

If advancing technology makes my hybrid obsolete, imagine what it will do to a non-hybrid Pacifica.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
. I’ll spend a quarter or less of that on fuel with the hybrid. Between that, the good deal I got, and the $7,500 tax credit, it was a no-brainer. My total cost of ownership will be significantly lower.
You mentioned you got a good deal on the car. If you don’t mind me asking, how much were you able to get off sticker price? I’ve only been to one dealer and it didn’t sound like it was going to be able to come down a significant amount.
 

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You mentioned you got a good deal on the car. If you don’t mind me asking, how much were you able to get off sticker price? I’ve only been to one dealer and it didn’t sound like it was going to be able to come down a significant amount.
If you can wait until a few months into 2020 you’re likely to see better discounts. If you can find a 2019 with features you need, you’ll get several thousand off MSRP between incentives and dealer discounts. For a ‘20, discounts from the dealer will be thin on the ground, unless you find a volume dealer, as some here have noted. Criswell Chrysler in Maryland is one that’s been mentioned on this forum, though people have had mixed experiences with the dealership. The quote I got from them was about 7% off MSRP before Chrysler incentives but didn’t make sense with the shipping costs that dealing with a distant dealer would’ve meant. If you’re closer to MD, it might be worth a look. If I didn’t have a trade to make and were closer, that’d have been the best deal I saw, hands down. @carlw8 is Carl’s handle on this forum, he works at the dealership. You can click his name in the previous sentence and initiate a chat to ask for a quote. The order I ultimately made locally was for about $1000 off MSRP before any Chrysler incentives, which will only be available at the time you take possession of the van. But several dealers I spoke to in my area were saying they could only do a couple hundred off MSRP, so what you’ve seen isn’t unusual. Hope that helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you so much for all that info. We can definitely wait, I just thought the end of the year was the best time to buy? Would waiting be better because the new models are coming out?
 

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Thank you so much for all that info. We can definitely wait, I just thought the end of the year was the best time to buy? Would waiting be better because the new models are coming out?
If buying an older model (18-19), this is definitely a good time to buy. The 20s are just being built in the past week and we’re hearing that they’re only being built to order, so definitely no big deals on the 20s. Thing about the older models (even new off the lot) is that you won’t find one with the advanced safety tech package, which is (a) extremely useful and (b) going to help the van hold its resale value much better.
 

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Once I got past a few issues with the charging system (they replaced the onboard charging module) I'd have to say that I couldn't imagine not having the PHEV version. I am averaging 90+ mpg- in fact my current tank has 1800 miles on it and I still have over ¼ left in it. The tax credit and other incentives made the price difference negligible. (Sadly I was only able to negotiate about 9% off sticker in SoCal.)
 

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When my wife and I wanted a new vehicle, another big selling point (other than what was stated already) was the ability to get a specialty plate or sticker that allowed HOV lane use all the time despite how many people are in the van. That alone cut down commute time during rush hour.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The tax credit and other incentives made the price difference negligible. (Sadly I was only able to negotiate about 9% off sticker in SoCal.)
Do you mind if I ask where in SoCal you got it? Also, have you noticed a change in your electric bill?
 

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Do you mind if I ask where in SoCal you got it? Also, have you noticed a change in your electric bill?
Where are you located Geographically? May be someone can find the best dealers in your state.
 

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Do you mind if I ask where in SoCal you got it? Also, have you noticed a change in your electric bill?
Sorry for the late reply, I purchased mine from JStar/Anaheim Hills at the end of 2017. I have noticed a negligible change in the bill, but I have solar and the spouse has an electric car- you should be able to calculate what additional costs would arise with charging the vehicle depending on your price per KWh- regardless it should be a lower cost than gas since it isn't a huge battery comparatively. BTW, I went over 2000 miles on my last tank.
 

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I am located in SoCal. That’s why I was asking where @Bond007 got theirs.
Huntington Beach usually has the best deals on Pacifica Hybrids, but I only see one available on the site now. Looks like it (presumably a spec order) is $1,100 off, plus the factory rebate and military discount too if you are eligible.

They'll frequently knock off $4-5k if they have more than a couple of vans on the lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Sorry for the late reply, I purchased mine from JStar/Anaheim Hills at the end of 2017. I have noticed a negligible change in the bill, but I have solar and the spouse has an electric car- you should be able to calculate what additional costs would arise with charging the vehicle depending on your price per KWh- regardless it should be a lower cost than gas since it isn't a huge battery comparatively. BTW, I went over 2000 miles on my last tank.
Thank you so much for the help. Sorry for the delay in response. How are you able to go 2000 miles? Is it a daily charge? I thought it only got 30 miles electric?
 

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... you should be able to calculate what additional costs would arise with charging the vehicle depending on your price per KWh- regardless it should be a lower cost than gas since it isn't a huge battery comparatively.
Actually, the size of the battery doesn't matter, it just depends on how much you drive on electric. According to the EPA, the PacHy uses 0.41kWh/mile. So if you drive 10 miles/day on electric, you'll use 0.41*10 = 4.1kWh/day.

Here's a fun fact (only relevant if you're in Hawaii):
  • We pay $0.35/kWh for power, so the cost to drive a PacHy on electric one mile is 0.41*0.35 = $0.14mile.
  • Gas is about $3.50/gallon, so to drive the PacGas one mile is 1/22 gallons * 3.50 = $0.16/mile.
This must be the only place in the USA where you actually don't save any money driving electric... (unless you make your own power, which we do.) Compared how expensive electricity is, gas is amazingly cheap here. It's actually cheaper than in CA! Of course, that could change any day.

For me getting the hybrid comes down to these factors: being able to make my own zero-emissions fuel, hating automatic transmissions, and just supporting a manufacturer in the electrification of the vehicle fleet. Cost-wise it will probably be a wash for us in the long run.
 

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Here's a fun fact (only relevant if you're in Hawaii):
  • We pay $0.35/kWh for power, so the cost to drive a PacHy on electric one mile is 0.41*0.35 = $0.14mile.
  • Gas is about $3.50/gallon, so to drive the PacGas one mile is 1/22 gallons * 3.50 = $0.16/mile.
Wow! I guess I should be happy I live in Illinois. For us it would be about $0.08 per kWh with all taxes, delivery fees, etc. included or about $2.50 per gallon of gas. That works out to about $0.03/mile for electric or $0.11 for gas.

Although I’m wondering where you’re getting the 1/22 number. Shouldn’t that be closer to 1/30?
 
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