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Discussion Starter #1
There's very little info in the public domain about custom PIDs for Chrysler vehicles. I've been poking around and I've made a bit of progress with my 2018 PacHy.

So far I think I've decoded two Mode 22 PIDs. I posted these earlier in another thread:

Commanded Power
PID: 221997
Equation: 100*A/255
Units: %
Header: 7E0

Absolute Accelerator Pedal Position
PID: 22114B
Equation: 100*A/255
Units: %
Header: 7E0

I have a preliminary list of about 75 Mode 22 PIDs that are returning some sequence of bytes. I'll post some more info later along with a CSV file. The majority of these values seem to change rarely or not at all.

I just stumbled across these by trying some Ford and GM Mode 22 PIDs. I imagine there are more to be found.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Still working on testing the PIDs before I post them. Also I'm ready to run a general scan for PIDs from 220000 to 22FFFF, just as soon as I get some time with the van.

I tried hooking up my OBDLink to monitor traffic on the CAN bus, which works fine on my Volt. It appears that the 2018 Pacifica implements FCA's new Security Gateway (SGW) module which only allows authorized tools to monitor through the data link connector. I don't think this is a big deal as I'll just need to splice into the CAN-C and CAN-IHS networks somewhere else. But I thought it was interesting to see new vehicle security features being implemented.
 

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I'm hoping you'll find the PID that shows what gear the transmission is in.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
I started scanning through the possible Mode 22 PIDs last night. Using header 7E0 which is the Powertrain Control Module, I was getting a lot of "7F" responses at first, meaning the PCM didn't understand the request. But once I got past about 220100 there started to be some seemingly valid responses coming back.

So for fun I tried address 7E1 and got nothing (just "NO DATA" from the OBDLink). This suggests 7E1 isn't a valid module address.

Then I tried 7E2 and got results similar to 7E0. Not sure which module 7E2 is. Looks like there's a lot of data available. The tough part will be figuring out what each PID represents.
 

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I'm hoping you'll find the PID that shows what gear the transmission is in.
PacHy has a CVT, no gear data to capture. @Breezy, are you aiming for any practical result? When I learned about Witech and the accompanying software, I consented that a home brew solution wouldn't be realistic.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm just interested in monitoring at this point. I tried Mode 22 on a lark. But there are at least 300 so far that are returning values. Whether they mean anything I don't know yet. The only ones that make sense to me so far are the two I listed above.

With some crowdsourcing, I think there's a good chance of finding some useful information to monitor through Mode 22. Transmission temperature, battery temperature, etc.

I'm hoping others will help. I can log about 100 PIDs at a time using OBDLink and the OBD Fusion app. I look for values that are changing. Then I try to figure out what they could represent. A bit of puzzle-solving entertainment.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm hoping you'll find the PID that shows what gear the transmission is in.
Try this. It's for the 3.0L Ecodiesel but maybe it's the same.

Current Gear?
Mode and PID: 223C22
Equation: A
Units: #
Header: 7E1
 

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Breezy, I have a 2013 Prius V with a ScanGage installed. The manual has a bunch of codes for various vehicles. Is it possible to work backwards to get their PIDs? (I dont really know what I am talking about!) But I could scan those pages and email them to you.
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Breezy, I have a 2013 Prius V with a ScanGage installed. The manual has a bunch of codes for various vehicles. Is it possible to work backwards to get their PIDs? (I dont really know what I am talking about!) But I could scan those pages and email them to you.
Pete
Yep, ScanGauge codes can be converted to PIDs. ScanGauge has a list of codes here:

https://www.scangauge.com/support/x-gauge-commands/
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Here's one I can't figure out. It seems to go to zero if I'm stopped or driving very slowly. It's generally greater than zero when driving, but sometimes still zero. The engine was running to provide heat while I was logging it. It seems to maybe be correlated to engine RPM, but not sure.

Unknown 221999
Mode and PID: 221999
Equation: A
Units: #
Header: 7E0

I've logged 100 PIDs so far and these are the only three that look interesting. As I find more I'll post a CSV file.

I have a new list of 106 PIDs ready to log on my next trip with the van. It's my wife's vehicle, and I only get a chance to play with this when I'm driving.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I logged a bunch of PIDs last night. Lots of interesting info being recorded. Now it's time to reverse-engineer what the PIDs represent.

Here's the list of PIDs that can be imported to Torque Pro, OBD Fusion and other apps. Also included is one of my log files.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Added engine coolant temperature and engine oil temperature.

I think 221999 is some sort of transmission mode indicator. When I’m driving on electric, without the engine running, it has the value 1. With the engine running it has different values, usually 3 but also other numbers between 2 and 8.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yes, exactly. Comma.ai's Cabana is a nice way to graphically plot the signals and their Python API for Panda works well.
Cool. I believe the OBD port is gateway-protected on 2018s, so I need to tap into CAN-C somewhere else.
 

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I tried TorquePro with a generic ELM327 adapter. It shows the basic data- speed, ICE RPM, pedal position. I loaded several custom OIDs for transmission temperature of several generation of the FCA vehicles- none of them gave me the reading.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I’ve been watching it this weekend, and 220121 is not engine oil temp. It doesn’t match the display in the van, and there’s no consistent offset.

It’s behaving like the temperature of something. Maybe that’s transmission temp?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I came across EASE Diagnostics which sells scan tool software. Unlike AutoEnginuity where you have to buy their interface ($250), EASE supports everything including cheap ELM tools.

It seems like a reasonable price for what you get. For $79 you get access to the powertrain modules (PCM, TCM, Battery Control Module) and for another $50 you get the Body Control Module, ABS, etc.

Pacifica, 2017 - EASE Diagnostics

I downloaded their X3 Pro software demo and tried it with my Volt. The 2018 Pacifica isn't supported yet, but the 2017 is. It's Windows only.

I had a serial port monitoring program running, and I was watching the demo send requests to the PCM (on the Volt). The values are scrambled in the demo, but it allows you to see which parameters you would get if you buy the licence.
 
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