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My sliding doors are not receptive to things in the way. I've tried blocking the doors in the past - the LOWER the things are and the more OPEN the door is, the better (faster, less pressure it takes) the response. When things get critical (i.e. when the door is almost closed) it take a HUGE shove to get it to open again. NO WAY a child could provide that shove and I'm becoming worried about kids getting in my van! Recently I was on a day trip with my DD7's BFF and her mom and her mom's hand was caught in my door. It did re-open and she tried not to make a big stink about it while still letting me know that her hand was crunched in the door. She wasn't "hurt" (i.e. no broken bones) but based on her reaction, I'm not sure she'll let her child ride in my van again and I'm worried about my own kids! She was trying not to make me feel bad but I know that her hand was really squashed in the door and it probably hurt quite a lot.

Has anyone had their sensors adjusted? Should I turn off the push-button door feature and use them manually? (That's super lame - the door should be responsive to a person in its path!)
 

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This episode might warrant contacting the dealer to see if there is a way the doors can somehow be recalibrated.
 

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My sliding doors are not receptive to things in the way. I've tried blocking the doors in the past - the LOWER the things are and the more OPEN the door is, the better (faster, less pressure it takes) the response. When things get critical (i.e. when the door is almost closed) it take a HUGE shove to get it to open again. NO WAY a child could provide that shove and I'm becoming worried about kids getting in my van! Recently I was on a day trip with my DD7's BFF and her mom and her mom's hand was caught in my door. It did re-open and she tried not to make a big stink about it while still letting me know that her hand was crunched in the door. She wasn't "hurt" (i.e. no broken bones) but based on her reaction, I'm not sure she'll let her child ride in my van again and I'm worried about my own kids! She was trying not to make me feel bad but I know that her hand was really squashed in the door and it probably hurt quite a lot.

Has anyone had their sensors adjusted? Should I turn off the push-button door feature and use them manually? (That's super lame - the door should be responsive to a person in its path!)
Thanks for the heads up. I haven't tested mine yet. But this is our first van with automatic doors, because my wife had gotten her leg cut by a Sienna door several years back.
 

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You've written many helpful, intelligent posts RC Mike. This wasn't one of them.
I was feeling snarky. It really is the answer, though. If it’s crunched someone’s hand... best to warn people not to have their hands their.

Sometimes we lose perspective on common-sense solutions. Should it stop? Sure, but it’s demonstrated that it won’t. Avoid having a hand there and take it to the dealer for inspection. When technology fails, simple problem solving has to step in.

I learned as a child not to have my hand in the way of a closing car door, just as I learned not to touch a hot stove burner. I’d like to think that we’re all still taught those things, or at least have some instinct towards self-preservation.
 

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I was feeling snarky. It really is the answer, though. If it’s crunched someone’s hand... best to warn people not to have their hands their.

Sometimes we lose perspective on common-sense solutions. Should it stop? Sure, but it’s demonstrated that it won’t. Avoid having a hand there and take it to the dealer for inspection. When technology fails, simple problem solving has to step in.

I learned as a child not to have my hand in the way of a closing car door, just as I learned not to touch a hot stove burner. I’d like to think that we’re all still taught those things, or at least have some instinct towards self-preservation.
I'm all for self-preservation, but accidents happen.
I'm sure the woman didn't plan on testing out the sensor that day.
It would be nice if the sensor, whose purpose was to prevent an injury, did just that.

I still cringe at the initial post, the word 'crunch' makes me picture the woman pulling back a mangled stump.
 

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I'm all for self-preservation, but accidents happen.

I'm sure the woman didn't plan on testing out the sensor that day.

It would be nice if the sensor, whose purpose was to prevent an injury, did just that.



I still cringe at the initial post, the word 'crunch' makes me picture the woman pulling back a mangled stump.


From the description it sounds like the sensor worked exactly as intended. There were no broken bones or permanent damage.

The first line of defense should be common sense of not having your hands in the door. I’ve talked to my kids specifically about where they are to put their hands getting in and out of the car. And that’s not just to stop the automatic doors from getting them but also accidentally being caught by a closing front door (with hand on B pillar). When I have new passengers I always verbally check that everyone is in and clear before closing the doors.

The auto stop is meant as an emergency fail safe so bones aren’t broken and no one is killed. It isn’t meant as a “no problem, go ahead and let it hit you” feature.
 

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My sliding doors are not receptive to things in the way. I've tried blocking the doors in the past - the LOWER the things are and the more OPEN the door is, the better (faster, less pressure it takes) the response. When things get critical (i.e. when the door is almost closed) it take a HUGE shove to get it to open again. NO WAY a child could provide that shove and I'm becoming worried about kids getting in my van! Recently I was on a day trip with my DD7's BFF and her mom and her mom's hand was caught in my door. It did re-open and she tried not to make a big stink about it while still letting me know that her hand was crunched in the door. She wasn't "hurt" (i.e. no broken bones) but based on her reaction, I'm not sure she'll let her child ride in my van again and I'm worried about my own kids! She was trying not to make me feel bad but I know that her hand was really squashed in the door and it probably hurt quite a lot.

Has anyone had their sensors adjusted? Should I turn off the push-button door feature and use them manually? (That's super lame - the door should be responsive to a person in its path!)
Ouch! Hope your friend's injury was minor and the pain went away quickly. You should have the door checked just to make sure it is performing properly. The hand is mostly bone and can easily get pinched between the protruding edge of the door and the door jamb. The result can be painful. The door reversing action cannot totally eliminate the possibility of a hand getting hurt. Well, it can, but the door closing speed would need to be very slow and the pressure setting very low. This would make the self closing feature unusable.

Depending on how you are doing it, I don't think shoving on the door is the best way to test it. Instead of trying to push or pull against the door you want to be an immoveable object in the path of the door. Just stand firmly in the path of the door and let the door make contact. I tried this within a couple inches of the door (before it started to close) and at the very end of the path (just before full closure). In both cases the pressure before reversing felt the same. I also placed my arm up against the door jamb (just behind the driver's door) and the door reversed without causing the slightest bit of discomfort. The pressure felt the same as the full body contact. No one (child included) should be shoving against the door to get it to reverse.
 

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I was once trying to get something from underneath the second row seats and had to kneel down because of infant car seat (while standing outside the car), my hand accidentally pressed the button on the pillar, and the door closed on my neck: it was so painful, and I was just glad that I wasn’t decapitated at that time. :D. I won’t try it again though. Some lessons are learned through experience. :D.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I was once trying to get something from underneath the second row seats and had to kneel down because of infant car seat (while standing outside the car), my hand accidentally pressed the button on the pillar, and the door closed on my neck: it was so painful, and I was just glad that I wasn’t decapitated at that time. :D. I won’t try it again though. Some lessons are learned through experience. :D.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Good think you don't own the Game of Thrones edition.
Would have taken it clean off.
 
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