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We just purchased a used 2017 Touring-L Pacifica last week and are really happy with it. This morning though when we got in, the passenger sliding door let out a new grinding noise when opening and closing. It seems to be coming from center track below the window. When I inspected it and compared it to the driver's side sliding door, I couldn't spot any visibile differences. After doing some digging online I found a few different posts about similar sounding issues, where the solution was taking it in to have grease applied.

From a TSB I found, it specifically mentioned a Nye grease lubricant. Since I feel perfectly competent applying the grease myself, I would like to avoid a trip to the dealer if possible. The problem is that there are few different Nye lubricants out there and they are all really expensive, like $40+ for a 50g tube. So, my question is if anyone knows the exct type of Nye lubricant is used or if there is something similar I could use that wouldn't harm any of the other parts in there or the paint? I would really rather have something on hand myself to fix this issue as it appears it might happen on the driver's side at some point or repeat in the future.
 

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I noticed the same thing when I did my initial inspection when buying the van. Just the right door. Toke right away to the service department and they ordered a new top hinge. Also noticed that the top chrome molding around the back window was NOT tight. It would not clip in so they ordered a new molding also.
 

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My Touring L Pacifica is in the dealer service department today to have the sliding door rollers replaced on both sides. The grinding noise was happening only on the driver side, but the dealer said they would replace on both sides. The noise was very obvious when opening the door, not much when closing. It was originally reported in May and the lubricating they did was not effective, so now they are replacing rollers. Doors must be completely disassembled on the inside so i need to leave it for 1 or 2 days to complete.
 

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My Touring L Pacifica is in the dealer service department today to have the sliding door rollers replaced on both sides. The grinding noise was happening only on the driver side, but the dealer said they would replace on both sides. The noise was very obvious when opening the door, not much when closing. It was originally reported in May and the lubricating they did was not effective, so now they are replacing rollers. Doors must be completely disassembled on the inside so i need to leave it for 1 or 2 days to complete.
Hi jonesrk8,

Please don't hesitate to PM our page with any questions or concerns that may arise during your dealership appointment, we're happy to help if needed!

Andrea
Chrysler Social Care Specialist
 

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I had the same grinding noise. Thought to myself before I try the grease or take it back to the dealer let me try good old wd40. It worked so far. Crossing my finger
 

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I was having the same issue with the passenger side. I took it into the dealer yesterday, they decided to replace the roller sets on both sides.
 

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Grinding noise is back after 2 months

My Touring L Pacifica is in the dealer service department today to have the sliding door rollers replaced on both sides. The grinding noise was happening only on the driver side, but the dealer said they would replace on both sides. The noise was very obvious when opening the door, not much when closing. It was originally reported in May and the lubricating they did was not effective, so now they are replacing rollers. Doors must be completely disassembled on the inside so i need to leave it for 1 or 2 days to complete.
The parts were replaced in July, but the noise is back in September. The dealership is ordering lower rollers and I have to call for another appointment in 5 days. It took them 2 full days to discover this along with doing the EGR recall.
 

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At least they are attempting to work on yours. They returned my Pacifica unfixed saying that Chrysler is aware of the sliding door grinding problem, is working on a fix and to check back at a later time.
 

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FWIW, they've told me parts (rollers) are back ordered, and it might be a month.
 

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The dealer replaced the rollers on the two doors, after two months the grinding noise is back, coming from the passenger side. It only happens when you open the door not closing it. It sounds like its coming from the back roller under the third row window.
 

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The parts were replaced in July, but the noise is back in September. The dealership is ordering lower rollers and I have to call for another appointment in 5 days. It took them 2 full days to discover this along with doing the EGR recall.
After waiting nearly 3 weeks for parts the roller replacement is done and the driver side sliding door is quiet and working properly. Passenger side has started to make a grinding sound again so I am sure I will be back at the dealer again soon for that issue.
 

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I wonder if here is a grease or wd-40 or something that owners can easily apply themselves quarterly or something. It shouldnt be our responsibility but I am curious.
 

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I had the same grinding noise. Thought to myself before I try the grease or take it back to the dealer let me try good old wd40. It worked so far. Crossing my finger
I had a grinding noise coming consistently from one of the sliding doors, too. I also tried spraying some WD-40 in and around the rollers. I cycled the door probably a dozen times after application and the noise gradually diminished to nothing. That was August, I think, and the noise has not come back since. So I second papapacifica's solution.
 

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I had a grinding noise coming consistently from one of the sliding doors, too. I also tried spraying some WD-40 in and around the rollers. I cycled the door probably a dozen times after application and the noise gradually diminished to nothing. That was August, I think, and the noise has not come back since. So I second papapacifica's solution.
To the best of my knowledge, I would refrain from EVER using WD-40 as a lubricant in that capacity. I have been told vehemently over the years by mechanics and others that WD-40 is a CLEANER and degreaser that is helpful in the short-term to loosen/remove tough bolts/nuts... or to clean threads, but to NEVER use it as a lubricant for moving parts. It may actually do the OPPOSITE of what you intend, and potentially break-down and remove any grease or oil that is there for long-term lubrication.

Maybe others smarter-than-I could chime in to confirm or deny my claims. :)
 

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To the best of my knowledge, I would refrain from EVER using WD-40 as a lubricant in that capacity. I have been told vehemently over the years by mechanics and others that WD-40 is a CLEANER and degreaser that is helpful in the short-term to loosen/remove tough bolts/nuts... or to clean threads, but to NEVER use it as a lubricant for moving parts. It may actually do the OPPOSITE of what you intend, and potentially break-down and remove any grease or oil that is there for long-term lubrication.

Maybe others smarter-than-I could chime in to confirm or deny my claims. :)
You're not the first person I've heard that from, and I'm open to hearing reasons why it's a bad idea. But to counterpoint, WD-40 sells a formulation that they specifically advertise for lubrication of "chains, cables, gears, rollers and bearings" and similar devices (https://wd40specialist.com/products/spray-gel). There may be certain applications where applying a general lubricant is a very bad idea, but I'm optimistic that this is not one of them. There may also be vastly more appropriate lubricants or greases for the job, but WD-40 is what I had handy, and I'm lazy and cheap sometimes.

Full disclosure: I used the general purpose WD-40, not the "specialist" variety that is advertised for this kind of job. However, comparing the Safety Data Sheets for both products (Specialist: https://www.wd40company.com/files/pdf/sds/specialist/wd-40-specialist-spray-and-stay-gel-lubricant.pdf ; WD-40 General Purpose: (https://www.wd40company.com/files/pdf/sds/mup/wd-40-multi-use-product-aerosol-sds-us-ghs-7-20-14.pdf), It's clear to me that the constituent chemicals in both formulations are the same, just in different proportions. So I would not expect one variety to do more harm than the other - I think the specialist blend is meant to be thicker and last longer.
 

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There is a TSB out there for the addressing the roller grinding noise that involves adding a special grease. I have chosen to spritz the roller bearings with Fluid Film lubricant & protectant to quiet the noise. That has worked for me. I don’t think Chrysler has made a design change to the roller parts yet so I’m not certain replacing them solely to get rid of the noise will work long term.
 

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@PacificaLimited , you are right. WD-40 was never really intended to be a lubricant. It was actually intended for wiring bundles for the Air Force for the F-4 fighter program. The AF was having a heck of a time keeping water out of the wiring because the water was causing corrosion and all sort of issues with the fighter. WD (water-displacement) 40 was the 40th attempt at coming up with a product that would cling to the wires better than water and drive the water out while still being non-conductive - and it does that very well.

Furthermore, it is not a grease, and it can wash out grease and leave surfaces subject to heavy shear forces woefully under lubricated and subject to heavy galling and premature failure.

Having said all that, I have had amazingly good results with WD-40 in some applications. I am a motorcyclist, and have used specialized chain lubes for years that have a highly volatile carrier and go on thin, but then thicken to a very heavy consistency and are supposed to minimize "fling-off" and stay in place on the chain to lubricate each of the links - which are in reality just mini bearings, Every one I tried still flings off, requires frequent re-application and makes my rear wheel filthy. I read about a guy who had switched to WD-40 with great results so I thought I'd give it a try and he was right. It was easy to apply, and yes, still flung off but was super easy to clean off my rear wheel, but also apparently still must have clung pretty well, because I got as good as if not better chain life using plain old WD-40 than I did out of any specialized chain lube.

While it is true that WD-40 cannot protect against heavy shear, one thing it does exceedingly well is: flow. One of the reasons that I have been so successful with WD-40 is that it clings so well and is tough to permanently drive out. It would never work well for a 5th wheel mating surface, for example, because it cannot begin to take those forces. But, for the roller bearings on sliding side doors that really aren't under that much load, what's most important is to keep them wet. And I can see that occasional use of WD-40 could work really well in that application - just like my motorcycle chain.
 
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