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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Our van came with the base 6-speaker system and sounds OK, but I'm looking to upgrade and was wondering what speakers you all have installed.

Right now I think I'm going to install two pairs of Kenwood Excelon KFC-XP6903C speakers. They cost more than I was initially looking to spend, but appear to be worth it.

After researching these a bit, they should fit with no problems. The 3.5" speakers should fit in the sliding doors where the Alpine/HK system tweeters would normally be. no mods are necessary since the door panels are the same and already have openings for them even though our van doesn't have any speakers there.

I was planning to see how they sound without installing an amp and add one later if necessary. I'll probably install some sound deadening while I'm at it.
 

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Any update on your upgrade? Did it worth it? I'm about to upgrade too.. im curious how your turned out..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Any update on your upgrade? Did it worth it? I'm about to upgrade too.. im curious how your turned out..
I haven't pulled the trigger yet. I've been waiting for those Kenwood speakers to go on sale, but I don't think they ever will until they are clearanced. We just adopted a couple kids too so that hasn't helped either. The OEM speakers sound just good enough that I'm content with the system as is, but know it could sound much better with just better speakers.

It's not advertised as such, but I think the base system has a decent external amp because ANC requires it. The ANC signal must be summed with the regular music before it is amplified. I don't think ANC would be very effective without good amplification. The clarity of the base system at high volume and the headroom it has seems to support this as well. With a hot music source the system volume tops out at about 31, but can be pushed to the max (38) if the source volume is low and still sounds clear.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I FINALLY got around to buying some new speakers. I got a set of the Kenwood Excelon KFC-XP6903C components for the front and a pair of Kicker 46CS6934 coaxials for the sliding doors. I hope to get them installed within the next few days. I ordered from Crutchfield yet again. I've been a customer with them for over 20 years, and they are still the best online retailer IMO. They included all three sets of speaker wiring adapters for free. I placed my order with one of their reps at 6:30 PM on Wednesday, but still got my stuff on Friday because they shipped using UPS 2nd Day Air.

Metra 72-7902 is the correct adapter for the dash speakers and all the other locations that use 3.5" drivers in the Alpine & Harman Kardon systems. For all the 6x9 speakers, Metra 72-6515 is actually the correct adapter harness.

I will post an update after I get things installed. I really wanted to install some sound deadening in the doors, but removing the carrier plate looks kinda hard. I also wanted to put sound deadening on the underside of the roof because it gets loud in the cabin when it rains, but decided it wasn't worth the effort to pull the headliner down. It looks very time consuming because of the all the wiring harnesses above the headliner and the HVAC ductwork & controls.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was able to get the Kenwood Excelon KFC-XP6903C component set installed in the dash & front doors Sunday night. I originally intended to take some pictures, but forgot to do so once I got at it.

There are a couple things I wanted to point out right off the bat:

1) You MUST use a trim tool to pry around the retaining pins to facilitate removing the door panels. The pins hold the door panels on very firmly. You will not be able to pull these off entirely by hand. Once you get the bottom 6 or 7 pins released (and the two 10mm bolts removed), you will be able to pull the door panel off, but it will take some brute force to displace the remaining pins. There's no way I could've removed the panels without a tool. Every time I pried one of the pins out of it's retainer with the tool it sounded like I broke something.

2) All of the wiring diagrams for the Pacifica have the positive and negative wires incorrectly labeled. The positive wires are actually the negative wires and vice versa. I haven't installed the rear speakers yet, but on the fronts this was the case. I actually put blind faith into the wiring diagrams and re-pinned my speaker wiring adapters ahead of time thinking it was necessary, but had to change them back after I discovered this.

The 3.5" speakers are a very tight fit, but do fit with some forward thinking. The two screws that hold each dash speaker in can be removed with a 7mm socket or a #2 phillips screwdriver. The 3.5" speakers must be installed with the terminals facing the rear of the vehicle, and the factory speakers were also installed this way. There are some thick plastic parts (HVAC ducts I believe) in front of and behind the dash speaker openings that make it a tight fit. There is a small pocket on the outside of the dash on both sides that I was able to place the small high-pass filter (HPF) boxes in without interfering with the front defroster cover. There was some foam included with the speakers that I attached to the HPFs to prevent them from rattling around. I didn't want to just them hanging in the dash by the speaker terminals, and there isn't a practical way to fasten them anywhere without removing the dash panel which is a lot of work.

The 6x9 drivers in the doors were also tricky to install. The 6x9 speakers themselves fit without a problem. The hard part was managing the extra wire so the window regulator didn't catch them when the window is moved up & down. The factory plugs have just the right amount of wire on them for the factory speakers, but the adapters add a plug and an extra six inches of wire to deal with. The T30 torx factory mounting screws must be re-used because they are thick with very coarse threads. The new screws that come with the speakers are too small to be used in the existing holes. Thankfully, Kenwood thought of this because the screw openings on the top bezel are larger then most I've seen and are rounded out just wide enough to re-use the existing screws. The manual actually instructs you to re-use the factory screws in Chrysler & Dodge vehicles.

So, how do they sound? Was it worth it? Short answer: They sound great, and it was totally worth the cost and effort to install them.

Long answer: The easiest way to describe the difference in sound is to say that sound stage is more in-your-face. It sounds overwhelming at first, but after you get used to it, it sounds much better IMO. The factory setup (again, our van has the base six-speaker system) used full range drivers in the front doors with the dash speakers mainly there to serve as tweeters to produce the really high frequencies and compensate for the high-frequency roll-off of the door speakers. The factory door speakers produced the vast majority of the sound though. The Kenwoods sound vastly different because the dash speakers produce most of the midrange and high frequencies.

The bass sounds noticeably better than the factory speakers, but not by much IMO. The bass is noticeably clearer and and less distorted at higher volumes, but comparable in loudness to the factory speakers overall. I need to listen more, but so far I think the factory 6x9 speakers actually produced slightly louder bass below 50Hz, but the new ones seem louder above that.

The 3.5" speakers are what make this Kenwood set shine IMO. I thought the sound stage was already pretty good with the factory speakers, but these Kenwood speakers make it GREAT. As I mentioned before, the factory dash speakers were only designed to reproduce really high frequencies. The capacitor on them actually serves as a high pass filter at about 9KHz. Whereas the Kenwood 3.5" speakers are designed to go all the way down to 850Hz using the included HPFs, so this explains the vast difference in sound. The new dash speakers are producing much more midrange than the old ones.The separate tweeter yields clearer highs too.

I hope to get the Kickers installed in the sliding doors later this week, and will post another update then.
 

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Wow thank for the detailled info there!! Ok, I did change all the 6x9(Skar Audio SK69), AND the 3.5(Skar audio TX35) in corner dash.. How did you notice that the wiring are reversed? I wired them following the Mopar wiring diagram site, They sound great, And i even gain volume!? BUT, since i did this, i can hear my engine at low rev in my speaker.. IM waiting on the anc-ch01 harness to bypass the anc with it, hoping it will fix the problem.. But if you don't have that problem, then maybe it is the wiring !? Let me know how you discovered this, I'll maybe have to open this van again to switch speaker polarity,,,

I also added some sound dampening in the doors.. While they were dismantled, it was easy to get too, easy to apply, and it does a great job. Especially when your get outside the vehicule, there is not one vibration wrong,

I'll be adding my subs , and a 4ch amp for my doors and dash this weeks.. Like i said, i wanna get rid of that noise before amplifiing anything :)

And Sliding door aren't too bad. Seriously, i was expecting alot more trouble than that. You can even pop out the handle from inside the door panel while its out, so you can completly remove it and put it aside.. You have to do all this sitting in the back inside the van.. Was easy and fun to do!
 

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Hi guys,

I just replaced 2 dash speakers with Pioneer TS-A878. They sound harsh intermittently. Meaning sometimes the mid and high sound really good exceed the stock speakers. But most of the time they sound really harsh. I replaced the same set on my 19 Cherokee and they sound really good.

I wonder if this is because of ANC interference or should I just try to reverse polarity first?
I used Metra 72-7902 and have 6 speakers system.

I was ready to replace the door speakers but I am afraid now because of this result.
freddief73 were you able to install sound deadening? how did you remove the carrier plate?

Thank you in advance guys!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Wow thank for the detailled info there!! Ok, I did change all the 6x9(Skar Audio SK69), AND the 3.5(Skar audio TX35) in corner dash.. How did you notice that the wiring are reversed? I wired them following the Mopar wiring diagram site, They sound great, And i even gain volume!? BUT, since i did this, i can hear my engine at low rev in my speaker.. IM waiting on the anc-ch01 harness to bypass the anc with it, hoping it will fix the problem.. But if you don't have that problem, then maybe it is the wiring !? Let me know how you discovered this, I'll maybe have to open this van again to switch speaker polarity,,,

I also added some sound dampening in the doors.. While they were dismantled, it was easy to get too, easy to apply, and it does a great job. Especially when your get outside the vehicule, there is not one vibration wrong,

I'll be adding my subs , and a 4ch amp for my doors and dash this weeks.. Like i said, i wanna get rid of that noise before amplifiing anything :)

And Sliding door aren't too bad. Seriously, i was expecting alot more trouble than that. You can even pop out the handle from inside the door panel while its out, so you can completly remove it and put it aside.. You have to do all this sitting in the back inside the van.. Was easy and fun to do!
I actually discovered that the polarity is labeled backwards in the diagrams by accident. I installed the left dash & front door speakers first, and before replacing the original speakers on the right side to compare them. When I started playing music and turned up the volume, I could immediately tell the speakers were out-of-phase with each other. Specifically, the left speakers were out of phase with the right speakers. When you hear out-of-phase speakers once you don't forget how it sounds. Two speakers that are out of phase with each other sound quietest when positioned in the center between them. This is because the cancelling effect is greatest when listening with equal distance from both speakers. Each speaker will sound louder as you move your ears closer to it because the cancelling effect decreases as you move further from the other speaker. Obviously, the farther the speakers are apart the less audible this becomes, but in a confined space like your car it is usually very obvious.

Like I said before, I reversed the polarity of all my speaker wiring adapters ahead of time assuming the wiring information from the service manual, Mopar's connector site, and Crutchfield's Mastersheet were correct because they all match each other. When I heard the new speakers were out-of-phase with the old ones, I thought it was impossible that all three sources could be wrong. I connected a 9V battery to each factory speaker (bypassing the capacitor on the dash speakers) to test their polarity. Sure enough, my findings confirmed that the wiring diagrams have the polarity incorrectly labeled. The 2.2 uF capacitor on the dash speakers is also wired in series with the negative terminal instead of the positive terminal like they typically are. I removed the left speakers again, re-pinned all the wiring harnesses back to how they came from Metra, and reinstalled them. When I listened again, the speakers sounded correct and in phase with each other.

If you do some online research, you'll find that other FCA vehicle owners also discovered this same anomaly with their vehicles. Many of them use the exact same speakers (have same OEM part numbers) as the Pacifica, so this is very plausible.

I also confirmed with an ohmmeter that the like colored wires are in fact the same between the dash speakers and the door speakers. In the base six speaker system, the dash speakers are wired in parallel with the front door speakers. Knowing this, I felt it was necessary to ensure that Chrysler wired the dash speakers to be in phase with the door speakers and not out of phase.

Just to clarify, everything with the wiring diagrams is correct with regard to colors and numbering of terminal locations. The only thing that is wrong is the positive and negative labels are reversed on all the speakers - at least on vans with the base audio system. It's very possible that all vans are like this regardless of which audio system they came with. The Metra 72-7902 (for 3.5" speaker locations) and 72-6515 (for 6x9" speaker locations) speaker wiring adapters are correct and should be used as they come without altering them.

Normally, polarity doesn't actually matter as long as all your speakers are connected the same way so that they're in phase with each other. However, in a system with Active Noise Cancelling, if all the speakers are connected backwards the speakers will generate a sound that amplifies engine noise instead of cancelling it out as intended. So if you are hearing engine noise in the speakers, checking and/or reversing their polarity is a good place to start.

I can confirm that ANC is working fine at this point, so the front speakers I installed are wired correctly. No engine noise is audible from any of the speakers. At this point I'm assuming that the sliding door speakers are also labeled backwards in the wiring diagrams, because when comparing front to rear speakers, they sound in phase with each other. I will make observations when installing the new rear speakers and post what I find afterwards. I hope to get them in later today or tonight.

I hope others find this helpful because I was completely blindsided with this issue. I still find it hard to believe that three reputable sources of information were consistently wrong.

Hi guys,

I just replaced 2 dash speakers with Pioneer TS-A878. They sound harsh intermittently. Meaning sometimes the mid and high sound really good exceed the stock speakers. But most of the time they sound really harsh. I replaced the same set on my 19 Cherokee and they sound really good.

I wonder if this is because of ANC interference or should I just try to reverse polarity first?
I used Metra 72-7902 and have 6 speakers system.

I was ready to replace the door speakers but I am afraid now because of this result.
freddief73 were you able to install sound deadening? how did you remove the carrier plate?

Thank you in advance guys!
If you used the Metra 72-7902 adapters (and didn't alter them), your speakers should be wired correctly. I would first check your EQ settings. Center all the bands and see if it goes away. You should install a bass blocker/capacitor in series with your front speakers. This will filter the lower frequencies that they can't reproduce, which will reduce distortion. If your Jeep has a premium Alpine/HK system, the signal that is being fed to the front dash speakers already has a high-pass filter applied to it (same goes for a Pacifica's Alpine/HK system). This would explain the difference in sound between the two vehicles.

I haven't installed any sound deadening, but I might attempt it later. The carrier plate actually looks easy to remove, it's just dealing with the window regulator and door latch in the process that I find intimidating.
 

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I actually discovered that the polarity is labeled backwards in the diagrams by accident. I installed the left dash & front door speakers first, and before replacing the original speakers on the right side to compare them. When I started playing music and turned up the volume, I could immediately tell the speakers were out-of-phase with each other. Specifically, the left speakers were out of phase with the right speakers. When you hear out-of-phase speakers once you don't forget how it sounds. Two speakers that are out of phase with each other sound quietest when positioned in the center between them. This is because the cancelling effect is greatest when listening with equal distance from both speakers. Each speaker will sound louder as you move your ears closer to it because the cancelling effect decreases as you move further from the other speaker. Obviously, the farther the speakers are apart the less audible this becomes, but in a confined space like your car it is usually very obvious.

Like I said before, I reversed the polarity of all my speaker wiring adapters ahead of time assuming the wiring information from the service manual, Mopar's connector site, and Crutchfield's Mastersheet were correct because they all match each other. When I heard the new speakers were out-of-phase with the old ones, I thought it was impossible that all three sources could be wrong. I connected a 9V battery to each factory speaker (bypassing the capacitor on the dash speakers) to test their polarity. Sure enough, my findings confirmed that, the wiring diagrams are have the polarity incorrectly labeled. The 2.2 uF capacitor on the dash speakers is also wired in series with the negative terminal instead of the positive terminal like they typically are. I removed the left speakers again, re-pinned all the wiring harnesses back to how they came from Metra, and reinstalled them. When I listened again, the speakers sounded correct and in phase with each other.

If you do some online research, you'll find that other FCA vehicle owners also discovered this same anomaly with their vehicles. Many of them use the exact same speakers (have same OEM part numbers) as the Pacifica, so this is very plausible.

I also confirmed with an ohmmeter that the like colored wires are in fact the same between the dash speakers and the door speakers. In the base six speaker system, the dash speakers are wired in parallel with the front door speakers. Knowing this, I felt it was necessary to ensure that Chrysler wired the dash speakers to be in phase with the door speakers and not out of phase.

Just to clarify, everything with the wiring diagrams is correct with regard to colors and numbering of terminal locations. The only thing that is wrong is the positive and negative labels are reversed on all the speakers - at least on vans with the base audio system. It's very possible that all vans are like this regardless of which audio system they came with. The Metra 72-7902 (for 3.5" speaker locations) and 72-6515 (for 6x9" speaker locations) speaker wiring adapters are correct and should be used as they come without altering them.

Normally, polarity doesn't actually matter as long as all your speakers are connected the same way so that they're in phase with each other. However, in a system with Active Noise Cancelling, if all the speakers are connected backwards the speakers will generate a sound that amplifies engine noise instead of cancelling it out as intended. So if you are hearing engine noise in the speakers, checking and/or reversing their polarity is a good place to start.

I can confirm that ANC is working fine at this point, so the front speakers I installed are wired correctly. No engine noise is audible from any of the speakers. At this point I'm assuming that the sliding door speakers are also labeled backwards in the wiring diagrams, because when comparing front to rear speakers, they sound in phase with each other. I will make observations when installing the new rear speakers and post what I find afterwards. I hope to get them in later today or tonight.

I hope others find this helpful because I was completely blindsided with this issue. I still find it hard to believe that three reputable sources of information were consistently wrong.



If you used the Metra 72-7902 adapters (and didn't alter them), your speakers should be wired correctly. I would first check your EQ settings. Center all the bands and see if it goes away. You should install a bass blocker/capacitor in series with your front speakers. This will filter the lower frequencies that they can't reproduce, which will reduce distortion. If your Jeep has a premium Alpine/HK system, the signal that is being fed to the front dash speakers already has a high-pass filter applied to it (same goes for a Pacifica's Alpine/HK system). This would explain the difference in sound between the two vehicles.

I haven't installed any sound deadening, but I might attempt it later. The carrier plate actually looks easy to remove, it's just dealing with the window regulator and door latch in the process that I find intimidating.
I'll check this out ASAP.. So many thanks to you, I'll keep you posted on wiring, and try to post picture if possible.. You did such a great detailled text, I really hope it will help other as it helps me! :)
 

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Ok, I tested polarity. You are 100% right! I joined the connector info from Mopar..

I did use a multimeter, put the red in the positive, and the black in the negative, (Following mopar wiring code) and i got those result!

IMG_20200617_200143.jpg
IMG_20200617_200146.jpg

Switched wire, black in positive, red in negative, (inversed polarity from mopar's code) and got those result..
IMG_20200617_200119.jpg
IMG_20200617_200125.jpg


Sounds like i'll be removing all door panels, again! :LOL:😂
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok, I tested polarity. You are 100% right! I joined the connector info from Mopar..

I did use a multimeter, put the red in the positive, and the black in the negative, (Following mopar wiring code) and i got those result!

IMG_20200617_200143.jpg
IMG_20200617_200146.jpg

Switched wire, black in positive, red in negative, (inversed polarity from mopar's code) and got those result..
IMG_20200617_200119.jpg
IMG_20200617_200125.jpg


Sounds like i'll be removing all door panels, again! :LOL:😂
What were you measuring with your multimeter?
 

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The way power was flowing.. By making that i can see i get a neg number or not.. Im able to see if power go on the right direction..

By plugin it red on red, black on black.. I should see a positive number.. but since the current is inverted in the wire connection, i get a negative number.. If i switch them ( oposite of mopar guide, and same as you), i get a positive output, im not measuring anything, just checking which way power come in and goes out..
 

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I don't remember exactly where i found this method, but it seems to work. I probably won't invest in a phase/polarity tester because i would use it only for this project. Maybe i should :unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I don't remember exactly where i found this method, but it seems to work. I probably won't invest in a phase/polarity tester because i would use it only for this project. Maybe i should :unsure:
Well, I can see your multimeter indicates a really small DC voltage, 9.5 mV to be exact. I'm just wondering why you're getting that reading. I'm thinking that you were probably measuring the small DC offset voltage produced by the amp. I don't know if this is an accurate way to check polarity because a music signal is actually AC voltage regardless if it's speaker level or preamp level.
 

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Well, I can see your multimeter indicates a really small DC voltage, 9.5 mV to be exact. I'm just wondering why you're getting that reading. I'm thinking that you were probably measuring the small DC offset voltage produced by the amp. I don't know if this is an accurate way to check polarity because a music signal is actually AC voltage regardless of it's speaker level or preamp level.
I'm not a tech, i tried a method i picked from a tutorial somewhere... I'm pretty sure i don't have an amp. Maybe the anc module is a little amplified itself, but i don't have another physical factory amp in my factory system. That im pretty sure.. While the multimeter was plugged in, i was simply playing noise from radio at really low volume, just to get something go in the wire..

Maybe this method is wrong, but, it seems to confirm the problem. I'll have to test on something else, maybe, but my problem seems to be inversed polarity in factory plug. I'll let you know when i fix everything. I really hope it will be ok!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm not a tech, i tried a method i picked from a tutorial somewhere... I'm pretty sure i don't have an amp. Maybe the anc module is a little amplified itself, but i don't have another physical factory amp in my factory system. That im pretty sure.. While the multimeter was plugged in, i was simply playing noise from radio at really low volume, just to get something go in the wire..

Maybe this method is wrong, but, it seems to confirm the problem. I'll have to test on something else, maybe, but my problem seems to be inversed polarity in factory plug. I'll let you know when i fix everything. I really hope it will be ok!
The ANC module is a small amplifier. It's not advertised as such, but it must be to do it's job.

I just installed the rear speakers. It was a little difficult, but not too bad. The polarity is also reversed on the rear speakers as expected. I installed the speaker wiring adapters as-is and everything sounds good. ANC is working fine and all the speakers sound like they are in phase with each other.

The sliding door panels were easier to remove than the front panels, but a little bit trickier for obvious reasons. I found that keeping the rear windows down helped so that I could open & close the doors as needed (child locks are enabled). The speakers barely fit because their magnets were right next to a structural beam in the doors. According to Crutchfield, the Kicker speakers I installed have a top mounting depth of 3-3/16". I attached six inch piece of rubber weatherstripping to each of the beams to ensure the magnets wouldn't rattle against them. The screw pattern is such that the speakers need to be perfectly positioned in order to get the screws in properly. I again was forced to re-use the original screws with the new speakers.

I'm happy with how things sound, but was hoping for a little more bass. The bass has about the same loudness as the factory speakers, but is certainly more defined with the volume turned up. It might improve some after the speakers break-in though. What I like most now is that when I make adjustments to the EQ now, the changes are more easily audible. Right now I have the EQ set at Bass +3/Mid -2/Treble 0. With the factory speakers, I couldn't hear much difference when I set the Mid and Treble bands above +3.
 

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The ANC module is a small amplifier. It's not advertised as such, but it must be to do it's job.

I just installed the rear speakers. It was a little difficult, but not too bad. The polarity is also reversed on the rear speakers as expected. I installed the speaker wiring adapters as-is and everything sounds good. ANC is working fine and all the speakers sound like they are in phase with each other.

The sliding door panels were easier to remove than the front panels, but a little bit trickier for obvious reasons. I found that keeping the rear windows down helped so that I could open & close the doors as needed (child locks are enabled). The speakers barely fit because their magnets were right next to a structural beam in the doors. According to Crutchfield, the Kicker speakers I installed have a top mounting depth of 3-3/16". I attached six inch piece of rubber weatherstripping to each of the beams to ensure the magnets wouldn't rattle against them. The screw pattern is such that the speakers need to be perfectly positioned in order to get the screws in properly. I again was forced to re-use the original screws with the new speakers.

I'm happy with how things sound, but was hoping for a little more bass. The bass has about the same loudness as the factory speakers, but is certainly more defined with the volume turned up. It might improve some after the speakers break-in though. What I like most now is that when I make adjustments to the EQ now, the changes are more easily audible. Right now I have the EQ set at Bass +3/Mid -2/Treble 0. With the factory speakers, I couldn't hear much difference when I set the Mid and Treble bands above +3.
Again! Thank you!

I just did re-wired all 4 6x9, and the 3.5. I did switch +/- on every speaker.. Im pretty happy. It sound allllmost the same... BUT, anc noise have disapeared. I get complete silence while music off and engine on!

Funny, on the diagram, like you said, colors are right, but +/- are reversed. When testing factory speaker with 9v battery to check polarity, the + in wired on the - if you follow diagram..

Well i followed you! And up to now, it is working really great.. ;)
 

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Hey, first time posting here. I posted this in the new members section, but thought it may be better suited here.
Have a question for the audio folks. I've been searching through the forum, reading different articles, and talking with some sales people in regards to upgrading the speaker system on my 2018 Pacifica Touring Plus.

Info: 7" uconnect with base 6 speaker system and roof mounted drop down DVD.

I want to upgrade the speakers to a mid level aftermarket, with basic amp and small sub. I'm not looking to rattle the windows, but just add a little better sound quality.

I understand that the ANC needs to be disabled in order to prevent interference from the increased noise/sub.

Heres where it gets confusing...
I can't seem to get a hard answer regarding how to add an amp. Ive read some people used a LOC, the rockford DSR1, or no amp at all. Do I need to install inline resistors so the radio doesnt shut the speaker off?
My goal is to retain the factory head unit since there are other integrated controls and not cut up all the of harness. I would also like to add some speakers in the stock location where the 13 alpine speakers would have been.

Has anyone done this? Whats the easiest, most cost effective method without getting too crazy with upgrades?

Thanks for any info!
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Hey, first time posting here. I posted this in the new members section, but thought it may be better suited here.
Have a question for the audio folks. I've been searching through the forum, reading different articles, and talking with some sales people in regards to upgrading the speaker system on my 2018 Pacifica Touring Plus.

Info: 7" uconnect with base 6 speaker system and roof mounted drop down DVD.

I want to upgrade the speakers to a mid level aftermarket, with basic amp and small sub. I'm not looking to rattle the windows, but just add a little better sound quality.

I understand that the ANC needs to be disabled in order to prevent interference from the increased noise/sub.

Heres where it gets confusing...
I can't seem to get a hard answer regarding how to add an amp. Ive read some people used a LOC, the rockford DSR1, or no amp at all. Do I need to install inline resistors so the radio doesnt shut the speaker off?
My goal is to retain the factory head unit since there are other integrated controls and not cut up all the of harness. I would also like to add some speakers in the stock location where the 13 alpine speakers would have been.

Has anyone done this? Whats the easiest, most cost effective method without getting too crazy with upgrades?

Thanks for any info!
I would advise against adding speakers where they would have been with an Alpine/HK system. I was originally going to do this, but I'm glad I didn't. Where they're located in the sliding doors is too close to your head/ears in the front seats. You won't have any level control for them unless connect them to a dedicated amp. This isn't a problem for the Alpine/HK systems because they use discrete amp outputs for each speaker that are tuned accordingly.

Finding a set of 3.5” speakers that fit there might also be a challenge because they have a fully enclosed baffle that's perfectly sized for the factory speakers. I suppose one could cut the baffle out, but I wouldn't recommend it.

If you are planning on using an amp for all of your speakers and the sub, I'd use PAC Audio's AmpPRO. It's plug 'n play and provides a hot set of 6-channel preamp RCA outputs. That's 4 regular channels and 2 (L & R) subwoofer channels. However, if you're planning to use the ANC module to power your speakers and only add an amp for the sub, you can't use an AmpPRO because it's an all or nothing upgrade with ”non-amplified" systems. The ANC module serves as the amp with the base system. So if ANC is bypassed, you have no way to power your speakers without adding amps.

An easy way to bypass ANC is to disconnect the four cabin microphones. The concept is simple: no input = no output. A lot of RAM truck owners have done this with good results. You could then just tap a good quality LOC into the speaker outputs to use with your sub amp. I'd recommend AudioControl's LC2i for the LOC. It can accept an amplified signal as an input, and removes any bass roll-off from the signal.

Based on how you described what kind of sound you want, I strongly recommend replacing all of the speakers first, and decide from there whether or not you want to add a sub. FWIW I thought the factory speakers produced decent bass. The speakers I installed (Kenwood KFC-XP6903C in dash & front doors; Kicker 46CSC6934 in sliding doors) made the bass slightly louder, but much more accurate - especially when the volume is turned up. It's not quite feel it in my chest bass, but four 6x9s move a lot of air and are definitely capable of going low. I was pleasantly surprised to not hear any rattles in the doors or anywhere else even though I didn't install any sound deadener.

I have a strong music recording/editing background so I apologize if the following sounds like gibberish. I have verified by playing sine waves that my new speakers produce audible bass all the way down to 25Hz. Noticeable rolloff starts at about 40Hz and drops considerably at 30Hz. Max output with my setup usually occurs with the volume set at about 30-32 (38 is max) with a good, modern recording and around 24-25 with a -1dB 40Hz or 50Hz sine wave. The latter will seem odd to the uninformed, but you need to remember that bass is very rarely recorded at that high of a level in music. I have the EQ set at Bass +3 Mid -1 High 0. I can't imagine that a small sub would improve bass much more than a good set of speakers unless you are feeding it 250+ watts (RMS) of power.

I have no measurements to prove it and I know it isn't advertised as such, but my ears tell me the ANC module is feeding a solid 30-35 watts RMS/channel to the speakers (four channels; dash and front door are paralleled together). It's head and shoulders louder than what a typical MOSFET chip amp in a headunit is capable of.

I know that seems unlikely considering the factory 6x9s are marked "15 watts", but my estimation makes sense if you think about it. The ANC system is designed to cancel out really low frequencies that are typically generated by the engine lugging at low RPM. Cancelling out that ”noise” at an acceptable level requires good amplification.

I also forgot to mention in my previous posts that I have the speaker leads connected to the "Bypass" terminals on the Kenwood woofers in the front doors. The manual doesn't specify what frequency the LPF is designed for, so I bypassed it. It sounds great this way. The mids from the woofers blend very well with the dash speakers (which have a HPF at 850Hz).
 
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