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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Recently most of the steering wheel controls on our 2017 Pacifica Touring L stopped working. The instrument cluster controls and the radio controls on the steering wheel aren't functioning. The instrument cluster info display is stuck on a trip computer page and none of the buttons work to switch the display. Also the steering lines on the backup camera are not showing up. The backup up camera otherwise works. The backup chime is also working. The cruise control functions are all working. I don't think it is the UConnect software because my phone connection is fine. I have seen responses on other posts such as:
  1. wiring harness - but how do I inspect the wiring harness?
  2. clock spring - how do I access and inspect the clock spring?
  3. Steering Wheel Control module - where is that located?
Does anybody have a suggestion? I would at least like to narrow down the problem before bringing it to a dealer.
 

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2: Don't mess with it. If the airbag malfunctions, it could injure or kill you. Let someone qualified look into the issue.
 

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Getting to the clock spring requires removing the steering wheel. That is not terribly difficult if you have the right tools and are patient. But the advice to have a pro check it out is for the best.
  • Did you buy the car used?
  • Does it have an aftermarket or dealer-installed alarm system?
  • Is there an added-on radio?
Any of the above items would likely have caused a tech to tap into the wires under the dashboard or inside the steering column. Most techs emphasize getting the job done fast instead of neatly. So it is easy (and frequent) to nick the wrong wire. The defect may take weeks to years to show up, as the nicked wire flexes and the remaining copper strands finally come apart. Another thing that can go wrong when someone messes with the wiring in those places is that the factory plugs & sockets can come loose. Even if the whole plug-socket connection looks OK, one or two of the wires going into the plug or socket may be partly dislodged.

My first guess is that you have a nicked wire that has finally come apart, or a loose connection at a plug. These are easy to fix--once you find them.

But first and always, disconnect the negative wires from both batteries under the hood and carefully wedge them away so they won't accidentally come back into contact with the battery terminals. Then wait at least 30 minutes for the airbag circuits to de-energize. If you can find a fuse marked "SRS" or "air bags" or both, pull them out also. Doing these things will prevent the airbags from going BANG and deploying while you are working with the wires.

Then using a screwdriver (Phillips or Torx, possibly 8 mm) you can remove the lower part of the steering column shroud and the knee bolster under the dashboard. You may need a plastic pry bar to pop some of the panels loose. Car parts stores and Harbor Freight sell those. A flat screw driver works, but will mar the surface. Then using a small, bright flashlight, start looking for damaged wiring.

That's all I can suggest without seeing the problem or knowing more. If you are not good with minor car repair and wiring, it's best to get a pro to look at it.

Something much like this happened to a Dodge truck at work. The idiots that installed an alarm shortened a wire inside the steering shroud. In two years of driving and using the tilt wheel, a connection would come loose and the truck would intermittently quit running when my 350 pound supervisor would drive it. He had the steering wheel adjusted all the way up. Changing drivers, and adjusting the steering wheel down made it start running again. We didn't like his driving, anyway. I fixed it eventually, when he figured it out.
 

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Just also remember that anything that’s connect was meant to be assembled and not disassembled . Ensure all connectors are with hand started , connectors pushed in and locked and most important is knowing where what screw , bolt , fastener came from and it’s torque when reassembled .
 

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Just also remember that anything that’s connect was meant to be assembled and not disassembled . Ensure all connectors are with hand started , connectors pushed in and locked and most important is knowing where what screw , bolt , fastener came from and it’s torque when reassembled .
I agree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Getting to the clock spring requires removing the steering wheel. That is not terribly difficult if you have the right tools and are patient. But the advice to have a pro check it out is for the best.
  • Did you buy the car used?
  • Does it have an aftermarket or dealer-installed alarm system?
  • Is there an added-on radio?
Any of the above items would likely have caused a tech to tap into the wires under the dashboard or inside the steering column. Most techs emphasize getting the job done fast instead of neatly. So it is easy (and frequent) to nick the wrong wire. The defect may take weeks to years to show up, as the nicked wire flexes and the remaining copper strands finally come apart. Another thing that can go wrong when someone messes with the wiring in those places is that the factory plugs & sockets can come loose. Even if the whole plug-socket connection looks OK, one or two of the wires going into the plug or socket may be partly dislodged.

My first guess is that you have a nicked wire that has finally come apart, or a loose connection at a plug. These are easy to fix--once you find them.

But first and always, disconnect the negative wires from both batteries under the hood and carefully wedge them away so they won't accidentally come back into contact with the battery terminals. Then wait at least 30 minutes for the airbag circuits to de-energize. If you can find a fuse marked "SRS" or "air bags" or both, pull them out also. Doing these things will prevent the airbags from going BANG and deploying while you are working with the wires.

Then using a screwdriver (Phillips or Torx, possibly 8 mm) you can remove the lower part of the steering column shroud and the knee bolster under the dashboard. You may need a plastic pry bar to pop some of the panels loose. Car parts stores and Harbor Freight sell those. A flat screw driver works, but will mar the surface. Then using a small, bright flashlight, start looking for damaged wiring.

That's all I can suggest without seeing the problem or knowing more. If you are not good with minor car repair and wiring, it's best to get a pro to look at it.

Something much like this happened to a Dodge truck at work. The idiots that installed an alarm shortened a wire inside the steering shroud. In two years of driving and using the tilt wheel, a connection would come loose and the truck would intermittently quit running when my 350 pound supervisor would drive it. He had the steering wheel adjusted all the way up. Changing drivers, and adjusting the steering wheel down made it start running again. We didn't like his driving, anyway. I fixed it eventually, when he figured it out.
Thanks. Bought the van new and nothing aftermarket was added to it.
 
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