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At a Pep Boys in FL.

Tire rotation comes with oil change.


They didn't do Tire rotation because.....


"If the rear tires have more tread we do not rotate."






Just checking to see if this is a real thing?



Thanks for any thoughts.







I know, I know...........it's Pep Boys - hah ha.
 

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I would say that it depends on the difference between the front and rear tires. The idea of rotation is to get even wear on all tires. But if there is a huge difference and the front's are just about finished, it would be better to keep the better tires on the rear. That way, in slicker road conditions, ie rain/snow, if you corner a little to aggressively, the better traction from the rear tires will help keep traction to keep the rear end from spinning out on you.
 
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I wouldn't trust them to change my oil, and if they rotated my tires, I would take a lug wrench to each lug to be sure they didn't over-torque or cross-thread before I left the place.
 
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Unfortunately, this has become a common recommendation among tire experts. Most "experts" say the tires with the most grip should be installed on the rear - which I also disagree with. Those that preach these things never think twice about what they're saying. It makes no sense on a FWD vehicle because the front tires always wear faster than the rear tires. If you truly followed this advice, you'd never rotate tires. You'd just install two new tires on the back, and move the rear tires up front after the old front tires wore out.
 

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Worn tires on the front , esp a fwd vehicle , only add to front end plowing and hydroplaning on slick roads . Agreed that the rears only follow the front but when your dealing with a front end loaded vehicle , weight distribution anyway , I’d put worn to the back all day long . You can turn the wheel anyway you want , but if it doesn’t turn , the backs won’t save you one bit .
 

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A FWD vehicle is more controllable in slippery conditions with the best tires on the rear. Yes, the front will plow or hydroplane, but this is more quickly sensed by the driver and corrected then the rear loosing grip. When the rear losses grip it can happen quicker than the average driver can respond and, once the rear is swinging out, it may go too far to be corrected.
 
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A FWD vehicle is more controllable in slippery conditions with the best tires on the rear. Yes, the front will plow or hydroplane, but this is more quickly sensed by the driver and corrected then the rear loosing grip. When the rear losses grip it can happen quicker than the average driver can respond and, once the rear is swinging out, it may go too far to be corrected.
Actually wrong fwd vehicles has power going to wheels , braking , steering input , abs . Anybody with driving experience will tell you that rwd vehicle is much more manageable and controlled due ti steering , throttle input control . Driver plays a huge part yes , but most people just step on the accelerator and spin the wheels . The ole saying about pushing vs pulling ( fwd vs rwd ) holds true .
 

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Unfortunately, this has become a common recommendation among tire experts. Most "experts" say the tires with the most grip should be installed on the rear - which I also disagree with. Those that preach these things never think twice about what they're saying. It makes no sense on a FWD vehicle because the front tires always wear faster than the rear tires. If you truly followed this advice, you'd never rotate tires. You'd just install two new tires on the back, and move the rear tires up front after the old front tires wore out.
I agree with you. Since I have had cars with FWD, I have stopped rotating tires and just buy new front tires when needed - the rears see WAY less wear than the fronts, and in rain and snow I want the best tread up front on an FWD car.
 

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Tire rotation comes with oil change.
They didn't do Tire rotation because.....
"If the rear tires have more tread we do not rotate."
Just curious... how many miles since last oil change/tire rotation?
 

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Actually wrong fwd vehicles has power going to wheels , braking , steering input , abs . Anybody with driving experience will tell you that rwd vehicle is much more manageable and controlled due ti steering , throttle input control . Driver plays a huge part yes , but most people just step on the accelerator and spin the wheels . The ole saying about pushing vs pulling ( fwd vs rwd ) holds true .
Actually, not wrong. The OP asked if tires with best tread on the rear is a real thing. I provided a response that explained why it is a real thing. You may not agree with it but, the fact remains, it is a real thing.

If all you are looking for is pulling traction, straight line or turning, then best tread on the front tires will perform better. Under deceleration such as braking, turning, hitting deeper snow or water, the rear end is pushing the front. In those situations, better tread on the rear performs better in terms of keeping the vehicle under control. A highly competent driver, reacting quickly and correctly, can power out of and/or turn in to the skid to keep the vehicle under control. This is not the case for most drivers whose first response to such situations is to apply the brakes, which only exasperates the problem.

Businesses are risk adverse, as are the insurance companies that cover them, due to so many lawsuits. It is not surprising that Pep Boys, and others, have policies such as what the OP experienced.
 

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Actually, not wrong. The OP asked if tires with best tread on the rear is a real thing. I provided a response that explained why it is a real thing. You may not agree with it but, the fact remains, it is a real thing.

If all you are looking for is pulling traction, straight line or turning, then best tread on the front tires will perform better. Under deceleration such as braking, turning, hitting deeper snow or water, the rear end is pushing the front. In those situations, better tread on the rear performs better in terms of keeping the vehicle under control. A highly competent driver, reacting quickly and correctly, can power out of and/or turn in to the skid to keep the vehicle under control. This is not the case for most drivers whose first response to such situations is to apply the brakes, which only exasperates the problem.

Businesses are risk adverse, as are the insurance companies that cover them, due to so many lawsuits. It is not surprising that Pep Boys, and others, have policies such as what the OP experienced.
Some businesses are not just about padding the bottom line , some mechanics are upfront about what actually needs replacement . So not doing a rotation is solely based on the mechanics degree of knowledge , not the company or business her works for . Liability falls upon the business but can further be traced back to the individual or individuals preforming a service , hence the contract . So I’m not agreeing or disagreeing Im merely stating facts about businesses , mechanics and any person who misrepresents something .
 

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Rotating tires means all 4 will wear basically evenly and will last the longest. Thats what rotation is really for. Maximizing tire life. Because front tires tend to wear more at the edges and rear tires in the middle. If you decide not to rotate, your tires may not last as long as the wear is focused in a smaller overall area. Its true that if you just replace a pair of tires, the new ones should go on the rear for the best stability.
I tend to rotate my tires whenever I switch them over from summer to winter to even out wear and maximize longevity.

As a side note, EVs tend to wear out their drive tires faster than ICE vehicles due to the torque’y nature of EV drivetrains. So they tend to recommend rotating quite often. But I think that recommendation is largely a customer satisfaction thing. It doesn’t look good when a vehicle wears tires out quickly. Even when the reason is too many Ludicrous Mode launches.
 

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So are you guys doing just a front to back & back to front?

OR doing front to back & then crossing the backs to the front?
 

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So are you guys doing just a front to back & back to front?

OR doing front to back & then crossing the backs to the front?
When I am ready I would do the second option. I used to like when I had a spare tire on my pickups that had a full size matching wheel I would incorporate it into the mix. Better than just sitting there getting dryrot and the rim getting beat up under the truck. In fact I would keep it in the back of the truck under the tonneau. Then if and when I used it or put it on it was clean and rust/corrosion free. These vans are crazy with no spare and self sealing tires with a 12v air pump with a bottle of sealer. I am considering getting a full sized matching wheel and tire and just leave it in the back area since I don't think i would put the seats up very often. We have 2 big dogs that ride back there so the seat is probably gonna look brand new foreve
 

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So are you guys doing just a front to back & back to front?

OR doing front to back & then crossing the backs to the front?
Just took my '21 to Costco for tire balance/ rotation. They crossed the rears to the fronts after bringing the fronts straight back.
 
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So are you guys doing just a front to back & back to front?

OR doing front to back & then crossing the backs to the front?
The latter is what I do. I intentionally do my first tire rotation prematurely, then as necessary after that based on what I observe for wear as measured by a tread depth tool. This allows me to use longer intervals after the first rotation because it then takes longer for the front tires to wear past what the rear tires are.
 
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The hybrids will also tend to wear out the front tires more quickly due to regen braking. When you’re using regen basically all the braking force is being applied to the front tires only. That will obviously tend to wear them quicker.
 
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