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I went to my local tire store to switch out my winter tires and this is the device they used to lift my PacHy. They just flat-bedded it even after I told them it was a hybrid and they needed to be very careful of the battery pack under the van. You can see the yellow lift points they use for Teslas but they didn't use anything on my PacHy but the big black flat surface.

Should I expect trouble down the road?
 

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Jack points are on the pinch welds just like any other car. The battery pack is in where the stow and go seats normally go. Nothing hangs below the pinch welds.

I jack up at the pinch welds to swap tires twice a year.

You'll be just fine.
 

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Jack points are on the pinch welds just like any other car. The battery pack is in where the stow and go seats normally go. Nothing hangs below the pinch welds.

I jack up at the pinch welds to swap tires twice a year.

You'll be just fine.
To go into a bit more detail, I would imagine the jack points are exactly the same as the base Pacifica 'L' since that's the platform upon which the PacHy is based. I believe FCA chose the 'L' since it does not come equipped with Stow n'Go seating, making the conversion a bit easier (and, more importantly, cheaper). Of course, that means we PacHy owners also miss out on some of the features the Stow n'Go versions get, but, hey...

It might also be said that, without the popularity of Stow n'Go, a PacHy might never have been built. Even further, maybe this is a reason FCA's minivan's competitors have eschewed a hybrid version. Simply put, it would be much harder (i.e., more expensive) for any of them because they'd have to create a completely, purpose-built, brand-new platform to accomodate a large, HV traction battery.
 

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You'd need a lift to lift more than 1 wheel at a time. Unless you get crafty with 2 jacks (sketchy?!?). The only lift points I've seen are the tires and the pinch welds.

A spare wheel / tire could be used for easy DIY tire rotations with only 1 jack.
 

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What's a preferred way to get two wheels up at the same time for tire rotation?

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I do this all the time. If you have a tall enough jack lift from the front pinch weld jack point (just underneath the side mirror), get the front wheel off the ground and keep lifting, and the back wheel will come off the ground too! Make sure this is a rolling jack so it will follow the arc as it goes higher. This works as long as you are only rotating front to back, or swapping winter/summer wheels.

If you need to swap left to right, you need to crawl under and find a central lifting point. There aren't many. I'll lift from the engine subframe if you can find it amongst all the belly pans, and in the rear there is usually a central point between the rear wheels, but you have to get under there to find it. I've only lifted our Pacifica from the side.
 

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If you need to swap left to right, you need to crawl under and find a central lifting point. There aren't many. I'll lift from the engine subframe if you can find it amongst all the belly pans, and in the rear there is usually a central point between the rear wheels, but you have to get under there to find it. I've only lifted our Pacifica from the side.
Does anyone do left to right anymore? I thought with the advent of radial tires, something about the way the internal belts only go one way, switching from side-to-side holds the potential of shortening tire life as the internal cords shift to the opposite direction when the tire's rotation is changed.

Now that I think of it, I wonder how many highway tire failures could have been indirectly caused by improper rotation. I'm thinking about the old Ford Escape/Firestone debacle that happened a few decades ago when a tire would blow-out on the highway and, due to the vehicle's high center of gravity, would cause a loss of control.
 

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Does anyone do left to right anymore? I thought with the advent of radial tires, something about the way the internal belts only go one way, switching from side-to-side holds the potential of shortening tire life as the internal cords shift to the opposite direction when the tire's rotation is changed.

Now that I think of it, I wonder how many highway tire failures could have been indirectly caused by improper rotation. I'm thinking about the old Ford Escape/Firestone debacle that happened a few decades ago when a tire would blow-out on the highway and, due to the vehicle's high center of gravity, would cause a loss of control.
I've been working on tires for years and never heard that about belts in radial tires. (radial tires became the norm starting in the 70's btw, 40 years back!) The belts in a tire do not care which way the tire rotates, it's about tread design. Some treads are very specifically directional, so should only be rotated front to back, but those have 'rotation' and arrows clearly marked on the sidewall. For most tires it doesn't matter, and the rotation pattern is completely up to the customer. Some prefer front to back, some prefer to criss-cross, etc. I know some people who won't rotate at all anymore, and replace in pairs as the fronts wear out or rears etc. It's usually snow tires or performance tires that have directional tread designs.

My recollection of the results from the Explorer/Firestone debacle was that Firestone engineers recommended a certain PSI based on the expected load, but Ford engineers overrulled them because the ride was too harsh. The tires were blowing out due to sidewall failures, due to low PSI. Firestone took the brunt of bad press but Ford was to blame. The high center of gravity and control problems were also a big deal, and the starting point of the stability control systems as we know them today. Ford somehow dodged a PR double-whammy with that, somehow they weren't blamed for the rollover-prone explorer's suspension, and Firestone took the heat on their reputation for tires. (and to be fair, a lot of early small SUVs were prone to rolling on loss of control, that has improved dramatically over the years)
 

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Jack points are on the pinch welds just like any other car. The battery pack is in where the stow and go seats normally go. Nothing hangs below the pinch welds.

I jack up at the pinch welds to swap tires twice a year.

You'll be just fine.
I agree with jacking the van on the pinch welds. It appears that the designated spots are directly below the side mirrors (front) and below the rear doors about 3/4 of the length of the door back from the front of it (rear). But there are plenty of things that hang below the pinch welds on my van including the rear suspension arms and most of the exhaust system. Perhaps you are just referring to the HV battery...
 

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If you need to swap left to right, you need to crawl under and find a central lifting point. There aren't many. I'll lift from the engine subframe if you can find it amongst all the belly pans, and in the rear there is usually a central point between the rear wheels, but you have to get under there to find it. I've only lifted our Pacifica from the side.
Is the oil pan strong enough to hold such a heavy vehicle?
 

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I do this all the time. If you have a tall enough jack lift from the front pinch weld jack point (just underneath the side mirror), get the front wheel off the ground and keep lifting, and the back wheel will come off the ground too! Make sure this is a rolling jack so it will follow the arc as it goes higher. This works as long as you are only rotating front to back, or swapping winter/summer wheels.

If you need to swap left to right, you need to crawl under and find a central lifting point. There aren't many. I'll lift from the engine subframe if you can find it amongst all the belly pans, and in the rear there is usually a central point between the rear wheels, but you have to get under there to find it. I've only lifted our Pacifica from the side.
As deekster_caddy notes, using a jack under the front jack point can lift both tires off the ground (see below). You can do a standard front cross wheel rotation with a good jack and two jack stands (see below). Correction: I did an X-pattern tire rotation which is an alternative method for front-wheel drive vehicles. (Swap left rear with right front and right rear with left front)
 

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I do this all the time. If you have a tall enough jack lift from the front pinch weld jack point (just underneath the side mirror), get the front wheel off the ground and keep lifting, and the back wheel will come off the ground too! Make sure this is a rolling jack so it will follow the arc as it goes higher. This works as long as you are only rotating front to back, or swapping winter/summer wheels.

If you need to swap left to right, you need to crawl under and find a central lifting point. There aren't many. I'll lift from the engine subframe if you can find it amongst all the belly pans, and in the rear there is usually a central point between the rear wheels, but you have to get under there to find it. I've only lifted our Pacifica from the side.
And to finish up, make sure you torque the nuts with a torque wrench. The specs for the PacHy are 100 ft-lbs. Photos below also show the jack points as viewed from under the car looking up.
 

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