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So I haven't driven it much, my wife does most of the driving, but I'm curious, does the MPG values on the screen represent the combined ICE/Electric? or just ICE? Last time I was in it, it said 28MPG, which wouldn't be bad if it was just ICE, but would be sort of bad if it was combined. We have done several 65 mile trips, so that would put 40% electric and 60% gas.

Thanks.
 

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So I haven't driven it much, my wife does most of the driving, but I'm curious, does the MPG values on the screen represent the combined ICE/Electric? or just ICE? Last time I was in it, it said 28MPG, which wouldn't be bad if it was just ICE, but would be sort of bad if it was combined. We have done several 65 mile trips, so that would put 40% electric and 60% gas.

Thanks.
From my experience (which is limited and without any real proof) it seems that the MPG reading is good for either ICE or electric but not both. It seems that as soon as the van switches on the ICE that the MPG reading drop very rapidly toward the MPG expected for the ICE. As an example, if I drive entirely on electric for, say 30 miles, I can achieve around 70-80 MPG. If I drive in hybrid mode for 30 miles I can achieve around 30 MPG. So one would think that on a trip where you drive 30 miles electric + 30 miles hybrid you could achieve a reading of around 55 MPG which is an average of the two. I have found this not to be the case. I end up see a reading of around 30 MPG for the whole trip. Maybe the reading is not really a long term average and instead is something like an average for the last 25 miles or so. ?????
 

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If you scroll thru the settings on the steering wheel you can find the average mpg that you have achieved currently as you drive , as well, you can reset the trip info and when the van shuts off it will display your distance you have driven in battery and ice mode.
 

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To bring this up again, just to make sure my van is not an odd one, I took an 80 mile trip recently with 0 battery, reset trip meter at start and at the end of the trip got 24.5mpg. Out of the 80 miles I drove about 12 miles in electric only mode (from regen), to me it looks like 24.5mpg is about normal if its only accounting for 68 miles of the trip and in electric only mode its not counting it towards your mpg.

Is that what others are seeing as well? Unfortunately the trip is not long enough for me to do a full tank test.
 

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So I haven't driven it much, my wife does most of the driving, but I'm curious, does the MPG values on the screen represent the combined ICE/Electric? or just ICE? Last time I was in it, it said 28MPG, which wouldn't be bad if it was just ICE, but would be sort of bad if it was combined. We have done several 65 mile trips, so that would put 40% electric and 60% gas.

Thanks.
Just another point. I’m pretty sure the avg MPG that is displayed is not necessarily the average since the display was reset but possibly only the average for the last xx miles driven. Not sure, but it seems like it may be that way.
 

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So I haven't driven it much, my wife does most of the driving, but I'm curious, does the MPG values on the screen represent the combined ICE/Electric? or just ICE? Last time I was in it, it said 28MPG, which wouldn't be bad if it was just ICE, but would be sort of bad if it was combined. We have done several 65 mile trips, so that would put 40% electric and 60% gas.

Thanks.

Pachy_viktor,
I've only got about 5K miles in two different PacHy this last 5 months, but I would suggest to you that you cannot accurately use the screen readouts on mileage. They are fun to look at, but for a variety of reasons, don't accurately reflect the true mileage you are getting (unfortunately).

Just for your peace of mind to know what you really get, next time you are going to take a long road trip over a day or two and not plug in between full tank after starting the day, then full tank at the end of the trip, do your own calculation to get the mileage. YOUR calculation of the total odometer reading at the end of the trip minus the odometer reading at the beginning. Then take off 30 miles for the full charge battery you had at the start. Now take that mileage number and divide by the gallons put in at the end of the trip to top off. This will give you your TRUE hybrid mileage.

I've not found a way to use the displayed numbers otherwise since it is difficult to separate the combination of plugged-in EV miles and ICE miles. You will find even if starting out with zero charge, you will accumulate EV miles on the display. So this I think really messes up the ability be accurate just using the display since those accumulated EV miles are displayed in the same set as the plug-in EV miles. Do your own once or two day calculation on a long road trip to get an idea of your true numbers.

I could be all wet here if someone else has figured out an accurate way to use the display, and thoughts folks?
ps. my signature area shows the mileage stats I found that I get. Would be interested in seeing if yours are similar, but would suspect so....as long as you aren't doing lots of high speed driving 70+MPH since that really increased wind resistance and reduces mileage in any vehicle.
 

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It's like counting calories...just don't!

The best way to get great mileage is to watch how you drive. I was going nuts doing math with the numbers being displayed, after filling up, after everything was depleted. I ended up doing trig while driving my daughter to Kindergarten, not fun. Then one day my schedule changed and things were shifted early in the morning. I found my self NOT racing out of neighborhoods, NOT hitting stop-n-go traffic in congested areas and NOT hitting windy roads with a ton of people on my tail.

I noticed I could stop slower or just coast, I didn't need to accelerate fast into any traffic and could take my time(ish) on long regular roads. Wow, to my surprise the mileage was going up, way up. The numbers always lag to make sure they calculate the right data to show. Give it a shot.
 

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No PacHy here, but I track all of my mileage on a phone app. Used to keep it on a Palm before that, and a paper pad way back when. It's a super easy way to track your real numbers.
 

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No PacHy here, but I track all of my mileage on a phone app. Used to keep it on a Palm before that, and a paper pad way back when. It's a super easy way to track your real numbers.


What phone app is that?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I believe that the MPG calculator on the dash does calculate both EV mode and Hybrid mode or both until reset. I live in Phoenix and go to Flagstaff 1 or 2 times a month. On my first time going I did a MPG test. With a full charge and a full tank started my trek with my wife and two kids. Got to Flag, charged up, did some in town driving, charged up again and returned. The trip was mostly 65 and 75 mph. The calculation turned out to be 31 on the screen. How it got to this number I don’t know yet. The reading was 111 miles electric and 242 miles of gas for a total of 343. When returning, filled up and used 10.68 gallons. Compared to another post, a gas version with a similar trip got a 26 screen calculation. The best I could get with my 15 Town and Country was 26. The OP might want to check out another tread called “brag about your mileage here”.
 

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What phone app is that?
I use Road Trip. https://darrensoft.ca/roadtrip/?source=app

It’s a really nicely done piece of software. Very quick data entry, and it syncs data between devices using Dropbox (there may be other options). It’s fast and easy enough that my wife uses it. Super handy for logging all the fuel stops, maintenance, and trips (I don’t keep track of trips).

Exporting the mileage and maintenance data helped me to get a better price on the last car I sold. Road Trip has some handy reporting features, too. Easy to see all the stats around fuel and maintenance. My 2008 T&C has cost me 14 cents per mile over its life, in terms of fuel and service.

I’m sure there are many other programs like this. The developer of Road Trip was pretty good to me—he converted the data I could export from an old, unsupported program into his software’s format for me. Did it quickly and for free.
 

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MPG on the dash blends MPGe from electric and MPG readings from ICE operation.

MPGe is “Miles Per Gallon equivalent”. It was created to scab Alternate fuel vehicles into the original and current laws governing the automotive industry which require a vehicle to have a MPG rating. This was more effective than changing the laws.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2000-06-12/pdf/00-14446.pdf

It has its flaws, but the essence is that they have given a BTU value to a gallon of gas and then used the equivalent BTU value of electricity to determine the rate of energy consumption.

I discount the MPG reading in electric mode and use it as an efficiency meter. However, they have blended ICE and Electric “MPG” with the assumption they are equivalent units.

This energy is used very differently by the vehicle so it’s not as simple as that, but it works very nicely for the laws in place.

I have three ways I use the electric MPG reading.

1) I do a conversion to indicate financial economy. I determine how many kWh I can buy for the price of 1 gallon of gas, and divide it by the 33.7kWh used to represent 1 gallon of gas.

This creates an financial correction ratio to the guage reading. Just multiply whatever it says by this number and that’s the cost MPG to drive electric.

Example: $2.60/gallon, $0.12/kWh. You get 21.66kWh for the money. 21.66kWh / 33.7kWh is 0.64. So if your guage says 84mpg all electric your paying the same as an 54mpg vehicle. (Mines happens to be an easy number and I can do it live)

2) you can hone your routes and driving style to find the best combinations.

3) you can calculate your carbon footprint. I’m in a hydroelectric region so I only track the actual fuel burned with Fuelly.

Driving style plays the biggest role on your MPG guage values. In both electric and hybrid modes.

But using mixed mode MPG values isn’t really accurate to base any useful calculations from it seems with the exception of an overall sense of efficiency IMO.

It is accurate as an energy consumption gauge.

Research hypermiler techniques to refine your driving style. I get 40-45mpg with 0% battery on road trips on the highways and well over 80mpg in electric mode quite comfortably.
 

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m0ebius604,
Great post.

Your 40-45MPG on zero battery is mentioned. I would assume this is using lower speed of 55-60 when on the highway? My guess is it would be less than 30 if you were doing 70-75 due to increased wind resistance.

Newf
 

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Rather then trying to reinvent the wheel, I go by the meter reading from the vehicle. The gas reading pretty much covers all non electric while the electric reading is the full electric PLUS all electrical power from regeneration. See my last fuel fill up data. You’ll see gas reading fairly low, while electric use high, more miles than achieved from charge ups at home. Took me 6 weeks between fill ups on gas. I find it very accurate.
 

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m0ebius604,
Great post.

Your 40-45MPG on zero battery is mentioned. I would assume this is using lower speed of 55-60 when on the highway? My guess is it would be less than 30 if you were doing 70-75 due to increased wind resistance.

Newf
Actually I get that driving from Vancouver to Seattle on the I5. At around 100kph (60mph)

One trick is to disengage ACC on downhills, prevent regen but allow the engine to turn off.. coast (0kW) as far as possible and resume When speed drops too low. Coasting is more efficient than regen if you don’t have to stop.
 

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Your 40-45MPG on zero battery is mentioned. I would assume this is using lower speed of 55-60 when on the highway? My guess is it would be less than 30 if you were doing 70-75 due to increased wind resistance.
Good guess. We typically drive 70-80 mph on long road trips. I reset the trip meters when we refuel and see the MPG reduced to 27-30 overall (ICE and electric due to regen instead of battery charging).
 
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