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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So the other day the van was plugged in and my wife went out to do something and said that the handle shocked her. I assumed she meant like a POW and you get the spark. She said nope that this was like current, not a quick discharge type of thing. Well today my kids were playing in the van and I went out to get them. My son slid out of the van from the front passenger seat and slid over where the molding joins on the floor and the frame for the edge of the door and jumped and said AHHHHhhh! I went to go touch that area to see if something was sharp at the molding and I got the same shock that my wife must have had. It is definitely current that you feel. I went and unplugged the van and touched there again and there was no current. I plugged it back in and there it was again. It has been raining out and the van is parked outside so thing are a little wet, but I looked at the charging port and there isn't any water in it.

This is mainly just to get a post out there so others can see. I'm going to call the dealer on Monday and see what they have to say about it and get the can in to be looked at.

EDIT: A little more info. It's the charging cable that came with the van. I went out and checked the lights and there were no weird lights on the box for the cable, though the cable had wiggled a little bit out of the socket. I think that perhaps the ground pin might not have have a good connection. Could this be something that would cause that? I reseated it and went and checked and didn't get a shock anymore.
 

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Hmm, this is a new one. The only suggestion that comes to mind is a grounding problem in your house. Although even that theory doesn't sound convincing. GFCI should be able to detect a bad ground. Get a simple non-contact voltage tester https://amzn.to/2WV3SUV and check if it shows.It is cheap and good to have around anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Is this a 220 volt setup?
You best get an electrician to check this, not an auto mechanic.
It is very doubtful you have a GFCI on a 220 volt circuit.
Nope not 220. It's a regular 110 garage outlet in my seperate garage.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmm, this is a new one. The only suggestion that comes to mind is a grounding problem in your house. Although even that theory doesn't sound convincing. GFCI should be able to detect a bad ground. Get a simple non-contact voltage tester https://amzn.to/2WV3SUV and check if it shows.It is cheap and good to have around anyway.
What would this do? I thought this would show if a line was hot? How would I use it to check for whatever issue might be present here?

Thanks.
 

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You should absolutely have a GFCI receptacle in your garage, whether or not the van is parked outside. It would have detected the current imbalance and tripped.
 

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What would this do? I thought this would show if a line was hot? How would I use it to check for whatever issue might be present here?

Thanks.
If the body of your car is energized it should light up as it does near a hot wire.

I think that chances of insulation failure in the van are minimal and your problem is probably outside. And the problem is hardly benign. As mainesail correctly pointed above, GFCI should take care of most issues. Although a minor leakage may be below its sensitivity. A hybrid certified dealer should have an insulation tester to check the charging port. Please keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If the body of your car is energized it should light up as it does near a hot wire.

I think that chances of insulation failure in the van are minimal and your problem is probably outside. And the problem is hardly benign. As mainesail correctly pointed above, GFCI should take care of most issues. Although a minor leakage may be below its sensitivity. A hybrid certified dealer should have an insulation tester to check the charging port. Please keep us posted.
Okay so the house we are in is a rental, though it is a friend's old house so I can just tell him to make happen whatever needs to happen. So the plan of action is to replace the standard outlet in the garage with a GFCI outlet first. Second I should take the van by the dealer and have them check to port to make sure all is right with it to be sure. Correct? Also I should have a tester around regardless for when I do my basic electrical stuff just to be sure the wires are no longer hot. I guess hitting them with the back of my hand to be sure they are dead is frowned upon huh?
 

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You should absolutely have a GFCI receptacle in your garage, whether or not the van is parked outside. It would have detected the current imbalance and tripped.
The EVSE should have GFCI built into it. I’m not 100% sure about the OEM charger that comes with the van but most EVSEs should have GFCI built in. My Siemens unit does.

If you’re getting a shock from the body of the car then there is definitely a problem with the vehicle in my opinion. If everything was correctly insulated there would be no way for the current to travel from the charging port to the body of the car. But, it doesn’t take much current to give you a shock. So that’s why your EVSE has a grounding plug. The ground from the outlet on your house should connect through to the grounded body of your car. That way, if you have an even miniscule current leak it will be drained off to ground on a very low resistance path before it can travel through your body (which is a higher resistance path) and shock you.

So from what the OP said I would assume that his vehicle has a small current leak to the car body. Possibly if the ground on the EVSE plug was not making good contact with the ground in the receptacle, then the current could not take the easy route to ground. Instead, it took the next easiest path which was through your wife’s body.
 

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Okay so the house we are in is a rental, though it is a friend's old house so I can just tell him to make happen whatever needs to happen. So the plan of action is to replace the standard outlet in the garage with a GFCI outlet first. Second I should take the van by the dealer and have them check to port to make sure all is right with it to be sure. Correct? Also I should have a tester around regardless for when I do my basic electrical stuff just to be sure the wires are no longer hot. I guess hitting them with the back of my hand to be sure they are dead is frowned upon huh?
Well, hitting with the back of your hand may be frowned upon but it does work. However, grabbing a door handle can be dangerous because if the current is strong enough it can cause the muscles in your hand to grip the handle even tighter.

My guess is that since it has been raining and the van was parked outside there was some moisture that created a temporary path between the hot side of the line and the body of the van. Even if you don’t see the water it maybe be a thin film that is difficult to see. In my mind the two most important things to do are:

1) Check the outlet in your garage to make sure that it is indeed grounded. You can get a little device that plugs into the outlet and will tell you.

2) Make sure that the EVSE is solidly plugged into the outlet such that the ground pin is making good connection with it. The EVSE passes the ground along through the J1772 connector (charge port) to the vehicle. If the vehicle is properly grounded then you won’t be able to get shocked by touching the car.

Installing a GFCI outlet in the garage is an extra safety precaution but is not as important as the two things I mentioned above.
 

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Okay so the house we are in is a rental, though it is a friend's old house so I can just tell him to make happen whatever needs to happen. So the plan of action is to replace the standard outlet in the garage with a GFCI outlet first. Second I should take the van by the dealer and have them check to port to make sure all is right with it to be sure. Correct? Also I should have a tester around regardless for when I do my basic electrical stuff just to be sure the wires are no longer hot. I guess hitting them with the back of my hand to be sure they are dead is frowned upon huh?
You should certainly start by taking the van to a dealer. They may know more than the internet experts here. Regardless of what they say and do you should be able to verify that the problem is solved, happens from time to time or happens every time. To do it without shocking yourself every time you'll need the tester.
I think it is not a car problem because the automotive grade parts are designed and assembled to higher standards than residential wiring. They are made to remain safe not only under a normal operation but even in a severe crash. I can still be wrong.
Garage outlets must be on a GFCI protected circuit. It doesn't mean that the outlet itself will have a GFCI receptacle. It may feed from another one or from a GFCI breaker in the panel.
In theory, the house or the EVSE GFCI should trip from any leak in the car. Either the leakage current is too weak or you have a non trivial problem in the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, hitting with the back of your hand may be frowned upon but it does work. However, grabbing a door handle can be dangerous because if the current is strong enough it can cause the muscles in your hand to grip the handle even tighter.

My guess is that since it has been raining and the van was parked outside there was some moisture that created a temporary path between the hot side of the line and the body of the van. Even if you don’t see the water it maybe be a thin film that is difficult to see. In my mind the two most important things to do are:

1) Check the outlet in your garage to make sure that it is indeed grounded. You can get a little device that plugs into the outlet and will tell you.

2) Make sure that the EVSE is solidly plugged into the outlet such that the ground pin is making good connection with it. The EVSE passes the ground along through the J1772 connector (charge port) to the vehicle. If the vehicle is properly grounded then you won’t be able to get shocked by touching the car.

Installing a GFCI outlet in the garage is an extra safety precaution but is not as important as the two things I mentioned above.
The outlet in the garage is mounted sideways so it causes a weird strain on the plug. Periodically I have to make sure to reseat the plug in the outlet as it tends to wiggle itself a little loose after constantly dragging the cable around as was the case this afternoon when I went to check it. I'll figure out a way to get this set up so there is no strain on the cable. Maybe mounted to a block on the wall or something so it isn't just hanging there.

I do have a power strip that lights up to indicate if it is grounded or not. I actually found an outlet in this old house that is 3 prong, but not grounded with this strip. Pretty sure that is a code violation, but regardless, it wouldn't surprise me to see that the garage one is the same. Tomorrow I'll head outside and test it out to see and report back here.

Normally the van is inside the garage, but the two times it has happened it has been parked outside. My wife doesn't recall if it was raining out when it happened to her though. Just that it happened.
 

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The EVSE should have GFCI built into it. I’m not 100% sure about the OEM charger that comes with the van but most EVSEs should have GFCI built in. My Siemens unit does.

If you’re getting a shock from the body of the car then there is definitely a problem with the vehicle in my opinion.
This is exactly the failure GFCI is made to protect from. It should detect if some of the current from the hot wire doesn't make it back to the neutral and flows to the ground instead. But both house and EVSE GFCIs didn't trip.
If the house ground is not properly earthed it may have some voltage in it. The van's body is connected to the house ground. It could be possible to get shocked from this ground potential and GFCI won't trip.
This is the only theory I could come up with.
 

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The outlet in the garage is mounted sideways so it causes a weird strain on the plug. Periodically I have to make sure to reseat the plug in the outlet as it tends to wiggle itself a little loose after constantly dragging the cable around as was the case this afternoon when I went to check it. I'll figure out a way to get this set up so there is no strain on the cable. Maybe mounted to a block on the wall or something so it isn't just hanging there.

I do have a power strip that lights up to indicate if it is grounded or not. I actually found an outlet in this old house that is 3 prong, but not grounded with this strip. Pretty sure that is a code violation, but regardless, it wouldn't surprise me to see that the garage one is the same. Tomorrow I'll head outside and test it out to see and report back here.

Normally the van is inside the garage, but the two times it has happened it has been parked outside. My wife doesn't recall if it was raining out when it happened to her though. Just that it happened.
Yeah, even if it wasn’t raining you can get condensing humidity whenever the dew point is reached at night. That’s what causes dew on the grass in your yard overnight. When the dew point is reached then water will condense on just about anything including the charging port of your van. But if the ground is good on the EVSE then your car’s body will also be grounded and there will be practically no possibility of getting shocked. GFCI outlets are a good safety precaution but they are not infallible. A good solid ground on the car will drain any current off so that you won’t be shocked.
 

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Okay so the house we are in is a rental, though it is a friend's old house so I can just tell him to make happen whatever needs to happen. So the plan of action is to replace the standard outlet in the garage with a GFCI outlet first. Second I should take the van by the dealer and have them check to port to make sure all is right with it to be sure. Correct? Also I should have a tester around regardless for when I do my basic electrical stuff just to be sure the wires are no longer hot. I guess hitting them with the back of my hand to be sure they are dead is frowned upon huh?
Another cause may be an open neutral at the receptacle. Open neutral is a nasty fault as it can allow the voltage in connected devices to drift up to 240VAC. Lights on such a faulty circuit can glow bright and burn out along with the crappy electrical stuff like your power conversion bricks for charging cell phones, etc. I've experienced this exciting problem first hand due to a faulty emergency generator which affected my entire house and took out about 12 power bricks in the house but luckily no major equipment. That fact you can move the EVSE plug in the receptacle and get a different result (Shock sometimes or not) suggests a worn out receptacle and/or no ground wire in the house wiring. By design, the ground pin on the plug is longer than the others so it should take care of stray currents in the vehicle if the receptacle is in good shape and properly wired to ground. A fault at the ground pin/socket by itself shouldn't energize the body of the PacHy.

Installing a GFCI receptacle would resolve issues with the receptacle but those devices may be finicky about charging the car due to it having relatively large capacitors in the power conversion modules. They are good things to have in a garage but starting first with a cheap conventional receptacle might take care of the problem and avoid mystery GFCI trips. Be careful if you encounter aluminum wires as they will need special cu-al rated receptacles. These are available at hardware stores you just have to look for them. I also use a special grease on aluminum wire which helps prevent oxidation. Also whether copper or aluminum, I always use the screws on the receptacles to connect the wires and not the little holes you stick the end of the wire in which are in the back of some receptacles. I have found those to be unreliable.

I would troubleshoot the house circuit before taking the car to the dealer as they may claim (without doing any investigation) that the vehicle or EVSE is damaged due to faulty wiring in the house. Using a voltmeter to check the car after you've fixed the house circuit (if it was faulty) should get you back in the comfort zone. Good luck, hope this helps.
 

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Suggestion:

Get a licensed electrician to verify the outlet is or is not properly grounded.
Your comment about:

"I actually found an outlet in this old house that is 3 prong, but not grounded with this strip."

... may indicate that the wiring and grounding in your house may not be up to code.

Don't mess with this potentially dangerous situation. Get a professional to make sure it's correct.
 

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If the house is older and doesn't have a grounded system, a GFCI won't work. It's even possible that the receptacles in the house allow the use of a 3 prong plug if someone converted them but don't have an actual ground wire.
 

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Another cause may be an open neutral at the receptacle. Open neutral is a nasty fault as it can allow the voltage in connected devices to drift up to 240VAC. Lights on such a faulty circuit can glow bright and burn out along with the crappy electrical stuff like your power conversion bricks for charging cell phones, etc. I've experienced this exciting problem first hand due to a faulty emergency generator which affected my entire house and took out about 12 power bricks in the house but luckily no major equipment. That fact you can move the EVSE plug in the receptacle and get a different result (Shock sometimes or not) suggests a worn out receptacle and/or no ground wire in the house wiring. By design, the ground pin on the plug is longer than the others so it should take care of stray currents in the vehicle if the receptacle is in good shape and properly wired to ground. A fault at the ground pin/socket by itself shouldn't energize the body of the PacHy.
An open neutral on a 120VAC socket will not cause the problem you are describing. What you are describing is an open neutral on generating equipment as connected to the home. If you connect both hot wires from a 240VAC generator to the hot wires of the house without connecting the neutral then all 120VAC circuits will not work correctly and the voltage on each circuit can vary according to the loads on the other circuits. And you’re right that in such a situation you are likely to burn out devices plugged into 120VAC circuits.

The OP is describing a 120VAC circuit in his garage. An open neutral at that receptacle should just merely cause the EVSE not to work.

stop-eject makes a good point. If something is wrong with the wiring of the ground at the receptacle this could cause the body of the car to become electrified even if it wasn’t wet, rainy, or humid. Sometimes a faulty connection in a ground line can cause the ground to float to a level above that of the neutral and that could actually cause the body of the car to become electrfied. An easy way to test this would be by using one of those non-contact voltage testers that electricians use. You can touch the thing to the outlet in the garage near each of the three conductors on the grounded receptacle. The tester doesn’t have to actually touch the conductor. It just has to be near it. It should only chirp,or illuminate an LED on the ‘hot’ conductor which is the smaller of the two flat conductors on the receptacle. It should not indicate voltage on the neutral or the ground pin.
 

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One thing an open neutral can do is give a shock to anyone grabbing it, assuming they are the path to ground.
 
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