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Hi,

I have been using a new 2018 chrysler pacifica hybrid limited for a month now. When i first started driving it, temperature was around 22-25 degC and i was getting close to 55Km of advertised electric mileage.
Now the temperature is around 10-12 degC and i am only getting close to 40Km range even if I donot turn on climate control. Even when it is full charged, the range is shown as 49km instead of 55km.

Do you guys have similar experience and is it normal?

Thanks
SV
 

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Plus colder temps will kick on the heater which chews up a bunch of electricity. Try turning off climate and just use the seat heaters... or just ignore it, turn up the radio and drive it. 👍
 

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We're getting close to winter here in Cadillac, Michigan. Have had a couple frosts. I have a level two 230V charge set up, and have been using it to prewarm the car's interior and keep the ICE from starting. By prewarming it, we don't use the climate control at all when driving around town.

The combination of cold outside temps plus heater on plus pushing on the gas a little too enthusiastically almost always results in the engine starting up, running at a very inefficient 1400 rpm, dropping to 1100 rpm when the converter lights off, then shutting down after no more than 5 minutes. I did some figgering last year, and the ICE gas mileage during those escapades is between 10 and 12. It also results in an oil refresh escapade after this happens around a dozen times, as the engine never warms up and the oil gets polluted. Mileage really goes to poop during oil refresh, as the engine never shuts off, even sitting still or coasting down hills. It's basically just burning gas and going along for the ride until the oil has been warm for long enough to reset it. To be avoided heartily.

What I've been doing is: 1) Charging the battery about 1 - 2 hours before we go anywhere. This warms it up. 2) Turning the car ON about 30 minutes before we leave (no brake pedal action) while plugged in, then turning heat/defrost on, setting temp to max, and blower on 4 or 5. This results in about a 5kWh load on the battery, which the level 2 charger handles nicely. The interior of the car is warm enough that we don't need heat to prevent the windows from fogging, and we do the entire trip without the engine starting. (Usually under 10 miles) Running the heater like that also warms the battery, as it's on the same coolant loop as the cabin heating grid.

Don't know how this will work out when it gets really cold here, but I'm sure we'll do better than last year, when I didn't have the level 2 charger.
 

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I'm not sure if it is worth that much effort to avoid the ICE running in cold temperature. Pre heating while plugged in is not free (unless like me you have solar panels on the house). In Massachusetts (we have very expensive electricity) 5Kw for 30 minuets costs about 55c. I do use the heated seats and wheel to help take the chill off without using too much battery power.
 

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It's about 40 cents here. Not that much less. Whether or not it's worth it to you depends on the temp, the distances you drive, and the speeds you drive.

Everything we do in town is 45 mph or less and under 10 miles. The ICE under those conditions is just miserable, as it never runs below 1100 rpm, which is too fast unless you're doing at least 50mph. I've done a lot of calculating and the bottom line is the car would have to get about 60mpg on gas to equal the average cost per mile on electricity. (gas at $2.70/gallon)

When the really cold weather gets here, I'll put up some fresh data. The summer time cost per mile was around 6 cents on electricity.
 

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It's about 40 cents here. Not that much less. Whether or not it's worth it to you depends on the temp, the distances you drive, and the speeds you drive.

Everything we do in town is 45 mph or less and under 10 miles. The ICE under those conditions is just miserable, as it never runs below 1100 rpm, which is too fast unless you're doing at least 50mph. I've done a lot of calculating and the bottom line is the car would have to get about 60mpg on gas to equal the average cost per mile on electricity. (gas at $2.70/gallon)

When the really cold weather gets here, I'll put up some fresh data. The summer time cost per mile was around 6 cents on electricity.
Wait, you want the engine to run below 1100 rpm? Why?
 

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It would not use as much gas if it was able to run slower, but I'm sure it can't. It has to run that fast so it can turn the small motor without stalling. The small motor is used as a generator and to control the sun gear speed in the transaxle.
 

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It would not use as much gas if it was able to run slower, but I'm sure it can't. It has to run that fast so it can turn the small motor without stalling. The small motor is used as a generator and to control the sun gear speed in the transaxle.
No. It doesn't run slower because that would be a dumb use of the relatively narrow powerband of traditional gas engines. It doesn't need to idle and it doesn't idle, at least not what we traditionally call idling.

The ICE is only needed when the electric motors need more oomph or for when the batteries are empty. The ICE comes on and sends it's power into either helping the bigger motor move the minivan or to generate electricity with the other smaller motor which in turn goes into either powering the bigger motor or it gets stored. To most efficiently do that with an ICE it needs to be at a decent rpm.

I know that sounds high to us when we expect to hear it idling, but it's not idling. In fact it probably would be better to be up around a more efficient 2000+ rpm on a 6 cylinder engine but I'm guessing chrysler felt that would cause too many complaints.
 

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I'm sure if Chrysler could make it run slower, they would. It would definitely raise the MPG. My 2009 Traverse was happy to stooge along at 900 - 1000 rpm under light load. 50 - 55 mph seems to be the cutpoint for efficiency. Above that, the car is mostly propelled by the engine. Below that, the CVT gearing has to reduce the ratio to accommodate the 1100 rpm. This can be seen as above the cutpoint, the battery does not get charged on level road driving. Below it, it does.

This is all just from observation, and studying the transaxle. Chrysler's not talking. I'd love to know the real capacity of the battery. I'm sure it's a lot more than advertised. Also, how much is actually left when it shows less than 1%? We know the 1% is not true, because if they really did that the battery would be destroyed immediately. On a depleted battery, you can drive around quite a lot and yet the engine is used to charge the battery only periodically. Some magical algorithms at work, I think.

On the highway, in hybrid mode, it's truly magnificent- 30-33 mpg. Engine shuts off going down hills, so no oil burning caused by using the engine as a brake. Going downhills, regen braking maintains whatever the CC is set to. Very quiet, as the CVT holds RPM to a minimum- only what's required. No stupid multi speed transmission endlessly hunting for the correct gear ratio.

In town, in electric mode, it's just superb. Instant acceleration and stone silence. Low operating cost.

In town, in hybrid, it sucks. The engine keeps cutting in around 23 mph and then cutting out whenever you lift your foot. My observations. I avoid it as much as possible.
 

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I'd love to know the real capacity of the battery. I'm sure it's a lot more than advertised. Also, how much is actually left when it shows less than 1%? We know the 1% is not true, because if they really did that the battery would be destroyed immediately. On a depleted battery, you can drive around quite a lot and yet the engine is used to charge the battery only periodically. Some magical algorithms at work, I think.
The original Alex on Autos review of the PacHy stated that 12.6 kWh of the battery was usable. That's essentially 80% usable, so it would stand to reason that Chrysler gives us from 10% (min) to 90% (max) of the battery's actual capacity within which to operate.
 

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The original Alex on Autos review of the PacHy stated that 12.6 kWh of the battery was usable. That's essentially 80% usable, so it would stand to reason that Chrysler gives us from 10% (min) to 90% (max) of the battery's actual capacity within which to operate.
FYI..

We already know the actual margins the Lithium Battery has reserved..

The HV battery utilizes 96 lithium cells for a nominal voltage of 360v @ 47Ah and is listed as a 16.7kWh pack. 0% gauge is 25% charge and 100% gauge is 90% charge as read out of the Battery Pack Control Module (BCPM) in the vehicle.

There is less than 12.6kWh useable.. However, this is the typical quantity used for a full charge; which people mistake as the useable power failing to consider any losses in the process.
 

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I'm sure if Chrysler could make it run slower, they would. It would definitely raise the MPG. My 2009 Traverse was happy to stooge along at 900 - 1000 rpm under light load. 50 - 55 mph seems to be the cutpoint for efficiency. Above that, the car is mostly propelled by the engine. Below that, the CVT gearing has to reduce the ratio to accommodate the 1100 rpm. This can be seen as above the cutpoint, the battery does not get charged on level road driving. Below it, it does.

This is all just from observation, and studying the transaxle. Chrysler's not talking. I'd love to know the real capacity of the battery. I'm sure it's a lot more than advertised. Also, how much is actually left when it shows less than 1%? We know the 1% is not true, because if they really did that the battery would be destroyed immediately. On a depleted battery, you can drive around quite a lot and yet the engine is used to charge the battery only periodically. Some magical algorithms at work, I think.

On the highway, in hybrid mode, it's truly magnificent- 30-33 mpg. Engine shuts off going down hills, so no oil burning caused by using the engine as a brake. Going downhills, regen braking maintains whatever the CC is set to. Very quiet, as the CVT holds RPM to a minimum- only what's required. No stupid multi speed transmission endlessly hunting for the correct gear ratio.

In town, in electric mode, it's just superb. Instant acceleration and stone silence. Low operating cost.

In town, in hybrid, it sucks. The engine keeps cutting in around 23 mph and then cutting out whenever you lift your foot. My observations. I avoid it as much as possible.
No, Chrysler would not make it run slower, that would be beyond stupid. It does not idle. 900rpm in a pentastar 6 cylinder is way below where it's power and efficiency is. The ICE is only there to help the main motor when needed and to regen the batteries.

Your Traverse was not a hybrid. Your pacifica does not have a CVT. Your pacifica does not idle. Your pacifica can go well above 70 mph on electric alone.

That being said you're 100% right about all electric vs hybrid mode, it's like a different vehicle.
 

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Take a look at this, then get back to me on the "no CVT" business. https://gas2.org/2017/10/31/deep-dive-chrysler-pacifica-hybrid-transaxle-w-video/
Thanks for the link. That's an article from 2017 with obvious disinformation (ie: we have no gear ratios to select from) but the linked Weber Auto video is awesome.

A CVT is a specific thing. The pacifica hybrid does not have one. We have no CVT parts, as the video shows. He describes this and even mentions that it acts "kinda like a CVT" at the 40:48 mark. He describes exactly what it does do at the beginning of the video and then again around 38:00. I think he also mentions CVTs in other parts of the video and in the comments but I don't have time right now to check.
 

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Take a look at this, then get back to me on the "no CVT" business. https://gas2.org/2017/10/31/deep-dive-chrysler-pacifica-hybrid-transaxle-w-video/
Inaccurate information. The Pacifica Hybrid does NOT have a CVT transaxle.

"features some sort of CVT that uses electronics, rather than inertia/rpm alone, to select its gear ratios " some sort??

The eFlight Si-EVT does not select or change gear ratios. It is called and Si-EVT for a reason, as that is exactly what it is. Not a valid article. Don't believe everything you see or read on the internet.

Perhaps these will help.

Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid Technology

Kevin Mets, chief engineer of the Hybrid and John Gibson, global chief engineer, Electrified Powertrains, of FCA provide details. Transaxle specifically 13:09.

 
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