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Lately I've been plugging in the van with the OEM charger that came with it. The charger starts blinking all these lights pretty quickly and it seems to correspond to when it's really hot in the garage. Is there a protect circuit in the charger if it gets hot or something. I'm guessing the temp in the garage is probably 90+ when this happens. The manual didn't help. Thoughts?
 

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From the owner's manual, starting on page 27:

Troubleshooting Using The Status Indicator Display
If the vehicle is not charging properly, consult the status indicator lights...


When a fault is detected, the AC Power Indicator, the Fault Indicator, or both the AC Power and Fault Indicators will flash red. If only the AC Power Indicator is red, there is a problem on the AC Power side of the unit. If only the Fault Indicator is flashing red, there is a problem internal to the unit or with the vehicle. If both the AC Power and Fault Indicators are flashing red, an over temperature condition is detected at either the AC plug or within the EVSE enclosure. Additional information about the faults is provided by a fault code that is displayed on the two green Charge Rate Indicators. The fault code consists of four digits, each with a value of 1 or 2. The value of a digit is the number of indicators illuminated for that part of the sequence. For example, fault code (1, 2, 1, 1) will display the following sequence: One indicator will illuminate for 0.3 seconds, then two indicators will illuminate, then one indicator, and finally one indicator will illuminate. After all four fault code digits have been displayed, the indicators will remain off for one second before repeating the sequence.


In the case of over temperatures, the manual identifies the following possibilities:

Flashing Fault Code
1, 1, 2, 1

Flashing Indicator
Fault & AC Power

Fault Indication
EVSE Enclosure Internal Temperature is Too High

Recommended Actions
Use caution as the Portable EVSE Cordset housing may be hot. It is recommended to move the Portable EVSE Cordset out of direct sun exposure. Allow the unit to cool. If error persists, check the Portable EVSE Cordset at a service location.



Flashing Fault Code
1, 1, 1, 2

Flashing Indicator
Fault & AC Power

Fault Indication
Hot AC Power Plug

Recommended Actions
Use caution as the Portable EVSE Cordset AC Power Warning Plug may be hot. It is recommended to carefully unplug the unit from the wall outlet and allow it to cool down. Attempt to charge the vehicle at a different wall outlet. Contact a certified electrician to inspect/replace the wall outlet that was associated with the Hot AC Plug event. Charging will still occur, but at a reduced rate.


Flashing Fault Code
1, 1, 1, 1

Flashing Indicator
Fault & AC Power

Fault Indication
AC Power Plug Over Temperature

Recommended Actions
Use caution as the Portable EVSE Cordset AC Power Plug may be hot. It is recommended to carefully unplug the unit from the wall outlet and allow it to cool down. Attempt to charge the vehicle at a different outlet. Contact a certified electrician to inspect/replace the outlet that was associated with the Hot AC Plug event
 

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The factory EVSE charger has a thermistor in the male 120V plug head. This 10 Kohm thermistor is a temperature sensor that the EVSE uses to detect a poor connection to your outlet contacts that are overheating. If the outlet you are using is old or poor quality, it may not make good contact with your charge plug contacts and may overheat. The EVSE will not put your house at risk if this occurs.
Remedy: Go to your local big box store and purchase a 20a rated commercial grade household outlet and replace the one in your house. These have stronger pinch loading of the plug blades and will make better contact for years of plugging and unplugging (I replace all my "loose" outlets with these). I would also recommend using a dedicated service outlet (only one outlet on that breaker), or at least the first outlet of that circuit's chain of outlets.
BTW, for those of you who use a 240V to 120V pigtail converter or an extension cord against the recommendations of the EVSE labeling, you have lost this thermistor's protection and may be putting your home at risk.
 

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The factory EVSE charger has a thermistor in the male 120V plug head. This 10 Kohm thermistor is a temperature sensor that the EVSE uses to detect a poor connection to your outlet contacts that are overheating. If the outlet you are using is old or poor quality, it may not make good contact with your charge plug contacts and may overheat. The EVSE will not put your house at risk if this occurs.
Remedy: Go to your local big box store and purchase a 20a rated commercial grade household outlet and replace the one in your house. These have stronger pinch loading of the plug blades and will make better contact for years of plugging and unplugging (I replace all my "loose" outlets with these). I would also recommend using a dedicated service outlet (only one outlet on that breaker), or at least the first outlet of that circuit's chain of outlets.
BTW, for those of you who use a 240V to 120V pigtail converter or an extension cord against the recommendations of the EVSE labeling, you have lost this thermistor's protection and may be putting your home at risk.
I replaced my 15 amp outlet last summer but ended up having to put a fan on it until the weather cooled. The charger starting faulting even sooner this summer, and the fan isn't helping. I've tried another outlet in the garage with the same effect. If I plug it in the house and run it under the garage door, it works just fine. Ideas?
 

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Yeah, no amount of replacing electrical components will stop physics. I had this exact same issue but you probably won’t like my solution!

I live in Phoenix and once the outside temp passed 100, I started getting the same fault. My garage gets the brunt of the sun from my house and when it’s 115 outside, it gets very very hot in there and within minutes of me hooking up the charger, it faults for temperature. I had an extremely heavy duty extension power cable, (I ensured it met all power ratings and requirements), so I tried that and it still faulted fairly quickly. Finally, after losing my mind trying to find a solution, I realized I have a chest freezer in my garage as well, this chest freezer had a basket in the top, so I did some modding of the freezer to allow the power cable to come into the freezer and hooked up the EVSE in the freezer, then routes the EVSE’s cable out to the vehicle from there. The EVSE says it’s rated for down to -50 Celsius and I know my power cable matches. The results of the story is that it worked great after that! Never had another fault and the charging is back up to normal 12 hours instead of the like 16-19 hours it was taking before when I would have an overheating fault.
 

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Yeah, no amount of replacing electrical components will stop physics. I had this exact same issue but you probably won’t like my solution!

I live in Phoenix and once the outside temp passed 100, I started getting the same fault. My garage gets the brunt of the sun from my house and when it’s 115 outside, it gets very very hot in there and within minutes of me hooking up the charger, it faults for temperature. I had an extremely heavy duty extension power cable, (I ensured it met all power ratings and requirements), so I tried that and it still faulted fairly quickly. Finally, after losing my mind trying to find a solution, I realized I have a chest freezer in my garage as well, this chest freezer had a basket in the top, so I did some modding of the freezer to allow the power cable to come into the freezer and hooked up the EVSE in the freezer, then routes the EVSE’s cable out to the vehicle from there. The EVSE says it’s rated for down to -50 Celsius and I know my power cable matches. The results of the story is that it worked great after that! Never had another fault and the charging is back up to normal 12 hours instead of the like 16-19 hours it was taking before when I would have an overheating fault.
Made me laugh but, hey, it works!
 

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I replaced my 15 amp outlet last summer but ended up having to put a fan on it until the weather cooled. The charger starting faulting even sooner this summer, and the fan isn't helping. I've tried another outlet in the garage with the same effect. If I plug it in the house and run it under the garage door, it works just fine. Ideas?
Small portable 120v or 12v with 120v adapter refrigerator. They sell them at truck stops.
 

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Yeah, no amount of replacing electrical components will stop physics. I had this exact same issue but you probably won’t like my solution!

I live in Phoenix and once the outside temp passed 100, I started getting the same fault. My garage gets the brunt of the sun from my house and when it’s 115 outside, it gets very very hot in there and within minutes of me hooking up the charger, it faults for temperature. I had an extremely heavy duty extension power cable, (I ensured it met all power ratings and requirements), so I tried that and it still faulted fairly quickly. Finally, after losing my mind trying to find a solution, I realized I have a chest freezer in my garage as well, this chest freezer had a basket in the top, so I did some modding of the freezer to allow the power cable to come into the freezer and hooked up the EVSE in the freezer, then routes the EVSE’s cable out to the vehicle from there. The EVSE says it’s rated for down to -50 Celsius and I know my power cable matches. The results of the story is that it worked great after that! Never had another fault and the charging is back up to normal 12 hours instead of the like 16-19 hours it was taking before when I would have an overheating fault.
I'm in Phoenix too. It started this summer around 90 degrees for me. I'm paranoid about using an extension cord since the manual advises not to. :frown2: Where did you find the EVSE's temp ratings?
 

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I almost feel humidity plays a role - it hasn't been blazing hot here in DFW but I've seen this issue in my garage, in hi-80s temps. Gets worse if humid.
 

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Yeah, no amount of replacing electrical components will stop physics. I had this exact same issue but you probably won’t like my solution!

I live in Phoenix and once the outside temp passed 100, I started getting the same fault. My garage gets the brunt of the sun from my house and when it’s 115 outside, it gets very very hot in there and within minutes of me hooking up the charger, it faults for temperature. I had an extremely heavy duty extension power cable, (I ensured it met all power ratings and requirements), so I tried that and it still faulted fairly quickly. Finally, after losing my mind trying to find a solution, I realized I have a chest freezer in my garage as well, this chest freezer had a basket in the top, so I did some modding of the freezer to allow the power cable to come into the freezer and hooked up the EVSE in the freezer, then routes the EVSE’s cable out to the vehicle from there. The EVSE says it’s rated for down to -50 Celsius and I know my power cable matches. The results of the story is that it worked great after that! Never had another fault and the charging is back up to normal 12 hours instead of the like 16-19 hours it was taking before when I would have an overheating fault.
I'm in Phoenix too. It started this summer around 90 degrees for me. I'm paranoid about using an extension cord since the manual advises not to. /forum/images/PacificaForums/smilies/tango_face_sad.png Where did you find the EVSE's temp ratings?
Yeah, that’s Phoenix for you haha. It took me a while but I found it inscribed on the cabling connected to the EVSE.
 

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I almost feel humidity plays a role - it hasn't been blazing hot here in DFW but I've seen this issue in my garage, in hi-80s temps. Gets worse if humid.
I think the humidity plays a role. I've noticed the same thing in Florida when the temps, while definitely warm, might not be considered 'hot'. But with a high humidity, the same problem occurs. At the very least, EV range decreases.
 

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I think the humidity plays a role. I've noticed the same thing in Florida when the temps, while definitely warm, might not be considered 'hot'. But with a high humidity, the same problem occurs. At the very least, EV range decreases.
Hmmmm. It wouldn’t seem that humidity would play a role in that. I think that high humidity only affects heat loss if evaporation is involved (like with the human body sweating). And since the thermistor would only detect temperature it wouldn’t care whether the humidity is 0 or 100%. Just my observation...
 

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Hmmmm. It wouldn’t seem that humidity would play a role in that. I think that high humidity only affects heat loss if evaporation is involved (like with the human body sweating). And since the thermistor would only detect temperature it wouldn’t care whether the humidity is 0 or 100%. Just my observation...
This is my understanding as well. We feel hotter when it's humid because our bodies use evaporative cooling to keep cool, and when the air has a higher saturation of water molecules, it decreases the effectiveness of evaporative cooling. For mechanical devices that are losing heat to the ambient environment around them, I believe that would be thermal radiative cooling. From what I can find, it does take more work to heat the water molecules in the air, but water molecules make up something like less then 1% of the total volume of the air itself, meaning the overall effect humidity would have on a hot item losing heat to its environment would be very close to no effect. If any of my science is wrong, please 100% chime in!

I recently vented my garage after noticing that often times, my garage was hotter then the outside ambient temperature. That has helped quite a bit. Once I'm able to obtain a dedicated Level 2 Charger, I believe I'll be done with this issue for good.
 

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I recently vented my garage after noticing that often times, my garage was hotter then the outside ambient temperature. That has helped quite a bit. Once I'm able to obtain a dedicated Level 2 Charger, I believe I'll be done with this issue for good.
Do you remember approximately what was the garage temp vs the outside temp? There's another thread about using a smoke alarm in a hot garage.
 

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Do you remember approximately what was the garage temp vs the outside temp? There's another thread about using a smoke alarm in a hot garage.
That's a great question. I don't have a temperature sensor set up in the garage, though that's been on my to-do list at some point! I suppose I could try to compare the vehicle's displayed exterior temperature after it has been parked in the garage for a while vs the temperature displayed after driving for a few minutes.

*Edited to Clarify* - My assumption that the garage was hotter then the exterior temperature was purely based on just how it felt.
 
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